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Old Owen Springs, Heritage Branch, NT Government Excavations at Old Owen Springs, July 2013. Read more here.

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AUSTRALASIAN SOCIETY FOR HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY

The Australian Society for Historical Archaeology (ASHA) was founded in 1970 to promote the study of historical archaeology in Australia. In 1991 the Society was expanded to include New Zealand and the Asia-Pacific region generally, and its name was changed to the Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology.

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National Trust (Australia)

Registrations are now open for the 2018 Australian Heritage Festival !

The Australian Heritage Festival is Australia’s biggest annual community-driven heritage festival. In April and May 2017, thousands of event organisers and volunteers across Australia managed almost 1,200 events to celebrate our fantastic heritage, history and culture. In 2018 we hope the festival will be even more inclusive and community inspired. We've provided lots of useful information, tips and help to ensure your event is a success.

This year we are focusing on what makes a place special, encouraging us all to embrace the future by sharing the strengths of our cultural identities. The 2018 Australian Heritage Festival theme is My Culture, My Story celebrating the diversity of cultures that have shaped our shared heritage. The Festival is an opportunity to reflect on the places where we live, work, and travel, and why they are special, celebrating our many diverse and distinctive cultures. So we call on communities to treasure their local cultural heritage by telling their stories and celebrating their traditions, including storytelling, music, food, dance, traditional games, and crafts.

What are the cultures of your region, and how are they celebrated? What are the stories of your community? Do you know an untold story that should be shared? What is the role of new generations in celebrating and protecting our heritage?

Please join us and get involved for what will be an amazing celebration.

The Australian Heritage Festival is supported through funding from the Australian Government’s National Trusts Partnership Program.

Note: Some States may have additional event organiser information and requirements.



Compiled by Blog Editor

Recent excavations of the cellar of a Georgian coffeehouse in Cambridge, UK have uncovered many hundreds of artefacts related to the business and it's customers. The works took place ahead of building works by St John’s College, Cambridge. Archaeologist Craig Cessford, from Cambridge University’s archaeology unit stated that “coffeehouses were important social centres during the 18th century, but relatively few assemblages of archaeological evidence have been recovered and this is the first time that we have been able to study one in such depth" through the artefacts recovered, which ranged from tea and servingware to remnants of calves feet used to make jelly for patrons.

For more information, see: www.theguardian.com/science/



Compiled by Alison Frappell and Blog Editor

Recent excavations in Paramatta have revealed the remains of the basement of the historic Wheatsheaf Hotel which was built in 1801, and opened only 12 years after Sydney was settled by Europeans. The excavation also uncovered remnants of a wheelwrights workshop and convict cabin, and a bakery, as well as associated artefacts. The site is being preserved, with the a new high rise development above it altering designs to allow for public access to the site. For more information, see the below links:

https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/world/

https://www.archaeology.org/news/

https://www.9news.com.au/national/

https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/business/