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AUSTRALASIAN SOCIETY FOR HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY

The Australian Society for Historical Archaeology (ASHA) was founded in 1970 to promote the study of historical archaeology in Australia. In 1991 the Society was expanded to include New Zealand and the Asia-Pacific region generally, and its name was changed to the Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology.

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2016 John Monash Medal Awardee

Engineers Australia, compiled by Richard Morrison

2016 John Monash Medal - Engineers Australia

This national award was presented to Keith Baker, ACT resident, chartered professional electrical engineer, post-graduate qualifications in cultural heritage management and heritage consultant, in January 2017 for his ‘outstanding contribution in raising awareness and conservation of the ACT’s heritage, and providing national leadership in the promotion of engineering heritage’. Keith had previously authored A century of Canberra engineering in 2013 (published by the Canberra Division, Engineers Australia).

For more information please see:
http://newsroom.engineersaustralia.org.au/news/member-profile/act-resident-receives-prestigious-national-engineering-award

http://www.canberratimes.com.au/act-news/canberra-man-awarded-national-medal-for-recording-engineering-heritage-20170119-gtumnu.html

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RESEARCH: Search for evil-averting marks

Ian Evans

Tasmanian Evil-averting Marks

The Tasmanian Magic Project has released a video which aims to enlist the aid of the general public in finding evil-averting marks. It’s hoped the video will raise awareness of the existence of these marks on old houses and buildings and so aid in the re-discovery of the lost and secret history of magic in 19th-century Australia.

Several marks are illustrated and it is hoped that further marks and new reports of known marks will be passed to the Magic Project as a result of the video. People who watch the video are encouraged to get in touch if they have seen any magic marks. The video was produced by Ruth Hazleton, folklore researcher and musician of Melbourne.

The video can be seen here: https://youtu.be/tMmaWwrAXHY.

Issued by the Tasmanian Magic Project
PO Box 591
Mullumbimby NSW 2482
Phone 0455 173 456
Email evansthebook@gmail.com

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EXCAVATION update, Triabunna, Tas

School of Archaeology & Anthropology, ANU College of Arts and the Social Sciences, compiled by Richard Morrison

Triabunna Field School, Tasmania

As reported previously this 2nd field work season was to be undertaken by Dr Ash Lenton, ANU, for undergraduates from there but also from the University of Sydney, in January and February 2017. It was to focus on the investigation of a military barracks which serviced the adjacent Maria Island convict settlement in the 1840’s.

A news report on the project can be found here
For more information see also:
http://sydney.edu.au/news-opinion/news/2017/01/23/student-dig-explores-tasmanian-barracks-of-colonial-regiment.html

https://m.facebook.com/TriabunnaBarracksANU.Dig/

Twitter #TriabunnaBarracks