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ASHA NEWS

UPCOMING EVENT: NSW Reading Group



Michael Lever

The NSW Archaeology Reading Group will next meet at 6.30pm on Monday 10th April at Unit 94 / 120 Saunders Street, Pyrmont.

To satisfy participant demands for Historical archaeology content, theory content, and some Binford, I've dug out a couple of my favourite items to read, centering around the topic: Binford & Historical Archaeology

Be assured, they are not your characteristic slog through Binfordian hyperbole and hypothetico-deductive puritanism. They are relatively light & I think captivating reads, and also illustrate change in Binford over time.

The two items are:

1) Binford, L. 1977: 'Historical Archaeology - It It Historical or Archaeological?' Pp13-22 in L. Ferguson (ed) Historical Archaeology and the Importance of Material Things. Special Publication Series Number 2. Society for Historical Archaeology (USA).

2) Binford, L & M Thurman 1998: Conversations with Lewis R. Binford on Historical Archaeology. Historical Archaeology, Vol. 32, No. 2 (1998), pp. 28-55

If you have any difficulty locating either of these, please contact me and I will supply (michael.d.lever@gmail.com / 0413 564 995).


UPCOMING EVENTS: NZ Archaeology Week



Collated by Bronwyn Woff

Members in New Zealand who are wishing to participate in the NZAA Archaeology Week (1-7 April 2017) activities can find an event schedule at the following link: www.nzarchaeology.org

Events include lectures, tours, walks, mock-digs for kids, exhibitions and displays, and open days. Please support these events which aim to raise awareness about the importance of archaeology to the public.

UPCOMING EVENT: Looking back, Looking forward



Caroline Spry, La Trobe University

All are invited to ‘Looking back, looking forward for La Trobe Archaeology’. This event, which ties in with La Trobe University’s 50th Anniversary, will connect students, staff, alumni and others, showcase La Trobe Archaeology’s capabilities and build pathways for future careers and research-industry collaborations. It will comprise a panel discussion on career pathways by alumni working in archaeology and cultural heritage management; discussions and demonstrations of the equipment and services offered by La Trobe Archaeology; and an opportunity for students, staff, alumni and others to meet, reconnect and create work opportunities and collaborations over light refreshments.

Please save the date, and stay tuned for more details:
Date: Friday 19th May 2017 (National Archaeology Week 2017)
Venue: La Trobe University, Melbourne (Bundoora campus)

Extension of Historic Shipwrecks Protection

Heritage Branch, Department of the Environment (Cwlth), compiled by Richard Morrison

The Minister, the Hon Josh Frydenberg MP, has announced that, this year, an extension to the current protection afforded only to shipwrecks, plane wrecks, Indigenous heritage sites and other underwater cultural sites, under the Historic Shipwrecks Act (1976), will be made under a new Underwater Cultural Heritage Act.

It was noted that this change will mean the historic sites will be registered on the Australian National Shipwrecks Database, and all access will require a permit, which acts as a deterrent to vandalism and theft. Additionally noted was that this would broaden and improve the protection of Australia's underwater history using the principles set down by the UNESCO 2001 Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage, and it will also enable Australia to pursue ratification of the convention.

For further information see http://www.environment.gov.au/minister/frydenberg/media-releases/mr20161129.html         

Key Concepts in Public Archaeology

Gabriel Moshenska, UCL Institute of Archaeology

This textbook provides a broad overview of the key concepts in public archaeology, research field that examines the relationship between archaeology and the public, in both theoretical and practical terms. While based on the long-standing programme of undergraduate and graduate teaching in public archaeology at UCL’s Institute of Archaeology, the book also takes into account the growth of scholarship from around the world and seeks to clarify what exactly ‘public archaeology’ is by promoting an inclusive, socially and politically engaged vision of the discipline.

Written for students and practitioners, the individual chapters – which can be read independently – provide textbook-level introductions to the themes, theories and controversies that connect archaeology to wider society, from the trade in illicit antiquities to the use of digital media in public engagement, and point readers to the most relevant case studies and learning resources to aid their further study.

This book is published as a ‘living book’ on UCL Press’s innovative digital platform. The first nine chapters are published in February 2017, with further chapters being added over the following months, to form an ongoing and developing resource on this fascinating topic.

Read it free online: https://goo.gl/NRaUkB

New Heritage Section - Environment Insitiute of Australia and New Zealand

Environment Institute of Australia and New Zealand Inc


Members may be interested in the following announcement from the EIANZ.

In November 2016, the Heritage Special Interest Section (Heritage SIS) was established following endorsement from the EIANZ Board. The purpose of the Heritage SIS is to:


Develop and promote knowledge about this specialised area of environmental practice
Advance the professional standing and recognition of heritage practitioners through the CEnvP Scheme.

For more information, please see the following link: https://www.eianz.org/about/heritage


Heritage Near Me Grants, NSW

Heritage Near Me Program

We are pleased to advise the opening of applications for two of the Heritage Near Me grant streams, which will see nearly $5 million available in the next financial year for local heritage projects.

The Local Heritage Strategic Projects program grants are being offered for the first time, while the Heritage Activation Grant Program has opened round 2. The new Local Heritage Strategic Projects program will provide $2 million in funding each year over three years, to provide new opportunities for local communities to collaborate on projects that conserve and rejuvenate their local heritage places. They will drive reform in how we protect, share and celebrate our heritage spaces with initiatives that focus on management and activation in communities.

The Local Heritage Strategic Projects program encourages local communities to identify their own priorities under four broad categories covering conservation and restoration, raising community awareness, innovation in heritage management, and broaden understanding of heritage values. Successful applicants of Local Heritage Strategic Projects will also be provided with specialist support and advice from initial project planning, through to delivery and evaluation from the Heritage Near Me Roadshow team.

The second round of funding through the Heritage Activation Grants stream is now open with a further $2.67 million available. These grants are designed to increase public enjoyment of local heritage by supporting projects such as physical works for better public access, new and innovative public programming, and the development of strategy and business plans.

Owners or managers of heritage items that are listed on their council’s Local Environmental Plan and regularly open to the public are invited to apply for funding through the Heritage Activation Grants program. Applications under the Local Heritage Strategic Projects are open year round subject to available funding. Applications under the Heritage Activation program are open from now until Monday 21 April.

We encourage all eligible individuals or groups to apply and please contact the Heritage Near Me team with any questions.

For more information and to apply, visit the Heritage Near Me Incentives program page.

UPCOMING EVENT: In Conversation with Judy Birmingham

The Nicholson Museum

Associate Professor Judy Birmingham is a significant figure in the history of archaeology in Australia. She studied at the Institute of Archaeology in London under Sir Max Mallowan and undertook extensive fieldwork in the Middle East, Cyprus, Greece and Britain with some of the most famous and fascinating figures of 20th century archaeology. Beginning with the Near East, she went on to pioneer the development of Australian historical archaeology in the 1970s and 1980s, leading excavations at sites such as Irrawang, Wybalenna and Regentville.

Sharing memories of the resistance she overcame while developing Australian historical archaeology courses, Judy will talk what it was like to be the first female archaeological staff member at the University, and her involvement with the Nicholson and Macleay Museum collections over five decades.

[Editor: To read more about Judy's contribution to Historical Archaeology in Australia, see the 2006 edition of Australasian Historical Archaeology, which included papers in her honour.]

Details: Tuesday 21 March, 6pm, Nicholson Museum

Price: $40, $30 for Friends of the Nicholson Museum and their Guests; includes light refreshments. RSVP Book and pay online HERE, email nicholson.museum@sydney.edu.au or call (02) 9351 2812.

Image Credit: John Carmichael, 'Irrawang vineyard and pottery, East Australia', 1838. National Gallery of Australia.

ASHA NEWS: 2017 Conference Announcement



ASHA and Interpretation Australia

Interpretation Australia and Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology are pleased to announce their joint 2017 conference: “Travelling Stories: connecting people and landscapes”

The conference aims to pull together folk with the ultimate aim of creating a greater understanding for all of the environments in which we live. This will be a conference with a difference, one that will travel in its venues from Launceston to Hobart via key natural and cultural heritage places through Tasmania!

CALL FOR PAPERS: SHAP 2017


AACAI NSW/ACT
AACAI NSW are pleased to present the Sydney Historical Archaeology Practitioner’s Workshop (SHAP) as part of National Archaeology Week 2017. The one day workshop is an opportunity for practitioners, students and those interested in historical archaeology to explore best practice, innovations and technology as well as recent historical archaeology projects in NSW. While we have received a number of presentation proposals already, we would like to offer everyone the opportunity to submit an abstract for a short presentation (10 -15min). A theme in several heritage conferences in Australia this year is ‘interpretation’. In keeping this thread going and to offer some inspiration for papers, we are using the theme ‘views and interpretations-historical archaeology in NSW.' The day will include keynote speakers, papers, practical demonstrations and discussions all related to current practice in historical archaeology. Tickets will be released shortly for booking a seat to attend the day hosted at the Big Dig Centre, The Rocks, Sydney.


In submitting a presentation or other session (discussion/ demonstration) proposal please submit t00he following:
a title for your presentation;
an abstract of 150 to 400 words;
presenter’s name (including prenominal –Dr/ Ms/ Mr etc)and company/affiliation
a sentence or two demonstrating the link between your presentation and our theme (if relevant)
and whether you would be interested in your presentation being published in the form of a paper in a journal or publication arising from the workshop

Send submissions by 5.00pm Fri 15 March to the NSW/ACT AACAI Secretary: dianacowie@gmail.com