asha

ASHA NEWS


AACAI NSW/ACT
AACAI NSW are pleased to present the Sydney Historical Archaeology Practitioner’s Workshop (SHAP) as part of National Archaeology Week 2017. The one day workshop is an opportunity for practitioners, students and those interested in historical archaeology to explore best practice, innovations and technology as well as recent historical archaeology projects in NSW. While we have received a number of presentation proposals already, we would like to offer everyone the opportunity to submit an abstract for a short presentation (10 -15min). A theme in several heritage conferences in Australia this year is ‘interpretation’. In keeping this thread going and to offer some inspiration for papers, we are using the theme ‘views and interpretations-historical archaeology in NSW.' The day will include keynote speakers, papers, practical demonstrations and discussions all related to current practice in historical archaeology. Tickets will be released shortly for booking a seat to attend the day hosted at the Big Dig Centre, The Rocks, Sydney.


In submitting a presentation or other session (discussion/ demonstration) proposal please submit t00he following:
a title for your presentation;
an abstract of 150 to 400 words;
presenter’s name (including prenominal –Dr/ Ms/ Mr etc)and company/affiliation
a sentence or two demonstrating the link between your presentation and our theme (if relevant)
and whether you would be interested in your presentation being published in the form of a paper in a journal or publication arising from the workshop

Send submissions by 5.00pm Fri 15 March to the NSW/ACT AACAI Secretary: dianacowie@gmail.com

Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

 
The Melbourne Free University is running a series of lectures entitled "History Matters". The lectures run from 6.30 - 8.00pm at The Alderman in Brunswick East.

Upcoming lectures include:
16 March - Susan Lawrence - Liquid gold: How controlling water made Victoria's miners rich
23 March - Nadia Rhook - Speaking in grids: the order of language from slums to Marvellous Melbourne
30 March - Katie Holmes - History of ANZAC
6 April - Liz Conor - Graphic distortions: The comic misadventures of cartoonist Eric Jolliffe's Whitchetty's Tribe (as read against 18C and other Whiteman Hissyfits)

 

For more information, please see the following link: http://www.melbournefreeuniversity.org/courses/history-matters/



University of New England

A lecture presented by Richard Tuffin and David Roe, entitled 'But did they wash behind their ears?: preliminary findings from the 2016 Penitentiary Ablutions archaeological excavation at Port Arthur' will be presented on Wednesday 15 March, at 4.00pm. The lecture will be held at the University of New England (Large Lecture Theatre EM1, Natural Resources Building (W55)) and will also be available via a recording on the Archaeology Society’s Echo 360 page (see link below).

During early 2016, a team of archaeologists undertook a programme of excavation within the ablutions area of the Penitentiary, Port Arthur Historic Site, Tasmania. From 1856–1877, the area housed the amenities blocks, exercise yards, shelter sheds and Day Room and is a vital key to understanding how Port Arthur’s most iconic structure operated as a place of incarceration. The archaeological excavation, part of a suite of ongoing conservation, interpretation and research works, was by far the largest ever carried out at the site and one of the largest research investigations of the convict-period undertaken in Australia. A team of seven professional archaeologists spent over four months on site, their findings already beginning to challenge existing views of how convicts and the authorities interacted with the space and with each other.

"This presentation will share the early results of the excavation, showcasing some of the more fascinating finds. The advanced recording methods used to conduct the investigation will also be discussed, including the generation of highly detailed 3D representations of the site using photogrammetric techniques.

Richard Tuffin served an initial term as an archaeologist at Port Arthur between 2001 and 2007. In an unintentional reversal of 19th century norms, Richard transported himself to Scotland, where he worked at the coal face of commercial archaeology. He gladly took up the offer of Penitentiary Project archaeologist in 2015. Dr David Roe is Archaeology Manager with the Port Arthur Historic Site Management Authority and has been involved with archaeological management and research in the UK, Portugal, Russia, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, Pitcairn Island and Australia. They are both part of the UNE/ UTAS/PAHMSA Australian Research Council 'Landscapes of Punishment and Production' project with Prof. Martin Gibbs and A. Prof David Roberts of UNE.

For people off-campus, the presentation will be recorded and made available through the Archaeology Society’s Echo 360 page HERE.

CAA Australia's first Spring Institute

The first Spring Institute will be held from 4th – 8th September 2017 at the ANU’s Kioloa Coastal Campus, jointly organised by CAA Australia and the Department of Archaeology, University of Sydney. It will be an intensive, five day, small-group (limit 30), residential, informal meeting promoting information exchange, training, networking and collaboration around a number of digital themes.

Participation cost for the Spring Institute is $250 – this includes registration, accommodation and food for the five days. Travel bursaries will be available for student and low income participants to equalise travel costs.

For more information, please see: http://au.caa-international.org/spring-institute/

Gretel Boswijk

This might be on the cusp (in terms of NZ timing) of what is considered Historical Archaeology, but ASHA readers may be interested in this new publication on using high resolution wigglematch radiocarbon dating. Palisade posts from a Waikato pa and construction were investigated, and were dated at 1768+-4 (95% probability). Article information and a link to the article can be found below.

Hogg, A., Gumbley, W., Boswijk, G., Petchey, F., Southon, J, Anderson, A., Roa, T., Donaldson, L. 2017. The first accurate and precise calendar dating of New Zealand Maori Pa, using Otahau Pa as a case study. Journal of Archaeological Science Reports 12, 124-133.

The article can be found at: https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1UTMg,rVDBGCvC

Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

Historical and Contact Archaeology in North Parramatta

A site currently being excavated in North Parramatta, New South Wales has found evidence of contact between European and local Indigenous peoples in fragments of glass. The excavators have also discovered evidence of leisure and ornamentation of the residents of the previous institutions located on the site.

For more information, please see the following link:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-02-21/artefacts-show-coexistence-between-aboriginals-and-europeans/8287950



Michael Lever

Following the success of our first session, the NSW Archaeology Reading Group will be meeting again at 6.30pm on Monday 6th March at Unit 94 / 120 Saunders Street, Pyrmont. We will be reading the following three articles suggested by attendants at the last meet. They are all fairly brief and there is no pressure to read all three – reading one article and engaging in discussion is fine. If you have any difficulty locating these items please contact me for a PDF.

While these articles are all on Aboriginal heritage and archaeology, the group is open to read any topics that attendants propose. If you plan on attending, feel free to bring snacks or drinks to share and please do RSVP to Michael.d.lever@gmail.com, or 0413 564 995.

Bradley, J. 2008. When a Stone Tool is a Dingo, in B. David (ed) Handbook of Landscape Archaeology. P633-637

Greer, S. 2010. Heritage and empowerment: community‐based Indigenous cultural heritage in northern Australia. International Journal of Heritage Studies, 16:1-2

White, B. 2012. Minimum Analytical Nodules and lithic activities at site W2, Hunter Valley, New South Wales. Australian Archaeology. 75. 25-36

Bronwyn Woff and Cathy Tucker

Please join us for a tour of Museum Victoria's dedicated storage facility on Friday 17th March 2017 followed by lunch at the Post Office Hotel in Coburg.



Attendees of the last tour enjoyed exploring the various objects of State significance at the storage facility late in 2016. Spots are limited so make sure you sign up soon!

See the following blog post for more on what the attendees of the last tour experienced:

http://www.asha.org.au/news/museum_store_tour


 


Bronwyn Woff, Research Associate, La Trobe University

The fragment of glass illustrated in the images below was found in the 1988 excavation season of Melbourne's Little Lon district. This area was reported to be a slum, with a mixed use of domestic and light industrial lots.


Crown glass window pane fragment. LL71844 Historical Archaeology Collection, Museums Victoria. Images: Bronwyn Woff

The glass fragment is the central panel of a spun crown glass sheet, which was created in the manufacture of glass for window panes. Hot glass was spun on a pontil rod so that it slowly spread into a large disc up to 1400mm wide. Because of this manufacturing technique, the glass was thicker at the centre than at the edges. The majority of glass imported to Australia from Britain before 1834 was manufactured in this way, as taxes and duties were lower than for other manufacturing techniques (Boow, 1991 pp.100-102). This glass fragment can be dated to between 1788 and the 1860s (Boow, 1991 pp.100-104).

Crown Glass being spun flat by glass makers. Image from “Glass in Architecture and Decoration” by Raymond McGrath & A.C. Frost, 2nd Edition, London, 1961 [1937], p. 75 via : https://blog.mcny.org/2014/11/25/whats-in-an-artifact-crown-glass/    (accessed February 28, 2017.)

In this case, the whole sheet was used and the central section was cut into a pane of glass with the "bulls eye" pontil mark in place. In some cases, these were ground out or otherwise modified so that the pontil mark was not evident, but in this example the snapped off pontil mark protrudes at least 5mm from the flat glass. One straight-cut edge of the window pane is present on the shortest side. Because of the flaw present in the glass, this window pane would have been much cheaper to purchase than a thin, outer fragment and this may reflect the buying power of the owners of the residential property where it was found at Little Lon.

 


"Spectactular clear bullseye glass panes in an English house" via: http://www.peachridgeglass.com/2012/04/the-bulls-eye-glass-pane/  (accessed February 28, 2017)


Bronwyn is currently working as a subcontracting archaeologist, cataloger and analyst. She is contactable via: bronwyn_woff@outlook.com.au
Engineers Australia, compiled by Richard Morrison

2016 John Monash Medal - Engineers Australia

This national award was presented to Keith Baker, ACT resident, chartered professional electrical engineer, post-graduate qualifications in cultural heritage management and heritage consultant, in January 2017 for his ‘outstanding contribution in raising awareness and conservation of the ACT’s heritage, and providing national leadership in the promotion of engineering heritage’. Keith had previously authored A century of Canberra engineering in 2013 (published by the Canberra Division, Engineers Australia).

For more information please see:
http://newsroom.engineersaustralia.org.au/news/member-profile/act-resident-receives-prestigious-national-engineering-award

http://www.canberratimes.com.au/act-news/canberra-man-awarded-national-medal-for-recording-engineering-heritage-20170119-gtumnu.html