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ASHA NEWS

Environment Institute of Australia and New Zealand Inc


Members may be interested in the following announcement from the EIANZ.

In November 2016, the Heritage Special Interest Section (Heritage SIS) was established following endorsement from the EIANZ Board. The purpose of the Heritage SIS is to:


Develop and promote knowledge about this specialised area of environmental practice
Advance the professional standing and recognition of heritage practitioners through the CEnvP Scheme.

For more information, please see the following link: https://www.eianz.org/about/heritage


Heritage Near Me Program

We are pleased to advise the opening of applications for two of the Heritage Near Me grant streams, which will see nearly $5 million available in the next financial year for local heritage projects.

The Local Heritage Strategic Projects program grants are being offered for the first time, while the Heritage Activation Grant Program has opened round 2. The new Local Heritage Strategic Projects program will provide $2 million in funding each year over three years, to provide new opportunities for local communities to collaborate on projects that conserve and rejuvenate their local heritage places. They will drive reform in how we protect, share and celebrate our heritage spaces with initiatives that focus on management and activation in communities.

The Local Heritage Strategic Projects program encourages local communities to identify their own priorities under four broad categories covering conservation and restoration, raising community awareness, innovation in heritage management, and broaden understanding of heritage values. Successful applicants of Local Heritage Strategic Projects will also be provided with specialist support and advice from initial project planning, through to delivery and evaluation from the Heritage Near Me Roadshow team.

The second round of funding through the Heritage Activation Grants stream is now open with a further $2.67 million available. These grants are designed to increase public enjoyment of local heritage by supporting projects such as physical works for better public access, new and innovative public programming, and the development of strategy and business plans.

Owners or managers of heritage items that are listed on their council’s Local Environmental Plan and regularly open to the public are invited to apply for funding through the Heritage Activation Grants program. Applications under the Local Heritage Strategic Projects are open year round subject to available funding. Applications under the Heritage Activation program are open from now until Monday 21 April.

We encourage all eligible individuals or groups to apply and please contact the Heritage Near Me team with any questions.

For more information and to apply, visit the Heritage Near Me Incentives program page.

The Nicholson Museum

Associate Professor Judy Birmingham is a significant figure in the history of archaeology in Australia. She studied at the Institute of Archaeology in London under Sir Max Mallowan and undertook extensive fieldwork in the Middle East, Cyprus, Greece and Britain with some of the most famous and fascinating figures of 20th century archaeology. Beginning with the Near East, she went on to pioneer the development of Australian historical archaeology in the 1970s and 1980s, leading excavations at sites such as Irrawang, Wybalenna and Regentville.

Sharing memories of the resistance she overcame while developing Australian historical archaeology courses, Judy will talk what it was like to be the first female archaeological staff member at the University, and her involvement with the Nicholson and Macleay Museum collections over five decades.

[Editor: To read more about Judy's contribution to Historical Archaeology in Australia, see the 2006 edition of Australasian Historical Archaeology, which included papers in her honour.]

Details: Tuesday 21 March, 6pm, Nicholson Museum

Price: $40, $30 for Friends of the Nicholson Museum and their Guests; includes light refreshments. RSVP Book and pay online HERE, email nicholson.museum@sydney.edu.au or call (02) 9351 2812.

Image Credit: John Carmichael, 'Irrawang vineyard and pottery, East Australia', 1838. National Gallery of Australia.



ASHA and Interpretation Australia

Interpretation Australia and Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology are pleased to announce their joint 2017 conference: “Travelling Stories: connecting people and landscapes”

The conference aims to pull together folk with the ultimate aim of creating a greater understanding for all of the environments in which we live. This will be a conference with a difference, one that will travel in its venues from Launceston to Hobart via key natural and cultural heritage places through Tasmania!


AACAI NSW/ACT
AACAI NSW are pleased to present the Sydney Historical Archaeology Practitioner’s Workshop (SHAP) as part of National Archaeology Week 2017. The one day workshop is an opportunity for practitioners, students and those interested in historical archaeology to explore best practice, innovations and technology as well as recent historical archaeology projects in NSW. While we have received a number of presentation proposals already, we would like to offer everyone the opportunity to submit an abstract for a short presentation (10 -15min). A theme in several heritage conferences in Australia this year is ‘interpretation’. In keeping this thread going and to offer some inspiration for papers, we are using the theme ‘views and interpretations-historical archaeology in NSW.' The day will include keynote speakers, papers, practical demonstrations and discussions all related to current practice in historical archaeology. Tickets will be released shortly for booking a seat to attend the day hosted at the Big Dig Centre, The Rocks, Sydney.


In submitting a presentation or other session (discussion/ demonstration) proposal please submit t00he following:
a title for your presentation;
an abstract of 150 to 400 words;
presenter’s name (including prenominal –Dr/ Ms/ Mr etc)and company/affiliation
a sentence or two demonstrating the link between your presentation and our theme (if relevant)
and whether you would be interested in your presentation being published in the form of a paper in a journal or publication arising from the workshop

Send submissions by 5.00pm Fri 15 March to the NSW/ACT AACAI Secretary: dianacowie@gmail.com

Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

 
The Melbourne Free University is running a series of lectures entitled "History Matters". The lectures run from 6.30 - 8.00pm at The Alderman in Brunswick East.

Upcoming lectures include:
16 March - Susan Lawrence - Liquid gold: How controlling water made Victoria's miners rich
23 March - Nadia Rhook - Speaking in grids: the order of language from slums to Marvellous Melbourne
30 March - Katie Holmes - History of ANZAC
6 April - Liz Conor - Graphic distortions: The comic misadventures of cartoonist Eric Jolliffe's Whitchetty's Tribe (as read against 18C and other Whiteman Hissyfits)

 

For more information, please see the following link: http://www.melbournefreeuniversity.org/courses/history-matters/



University of New England

A lecture presented by Richard Tuffin and David Roe, entitled 'But did they wash behind their ears?: preliminary findings from the 2016 Penitentiary Ablutions archaeological excavation at Port Arthur' will be presented on Wednesday 15 March, at 4.00pm. The lecture will be held at the University of New England (Large Lecture Theatre EM1, Natural Resources Building (W55)) and will also be available via a recording on the Archaeology Society’s Echo 360 page (see link below).

During early 2016, a team of archaeologists undertook a programme of excavation within the ablutions area of the Penitentiary, Port Arthur Historic Site, Tasmania. From 1856–1877, the area housed the amenities blocks, exercise yards, shelter sheds and Day Room and is a vital key to understanding how Port Arthur’s most iconic structure operated as a place of incarceration. The archaeological excavation, part of a suite of ongoing conservation, interpretation and research works, was by far the largest ever carried out at the site and one of the largest research investigations of the convict-period undertaken in Australia. A team of seven professional archaeologists spent over four months on site, their findings already beginning to challenge existing views of how convicts and the authorities interacted with the space and with each other.

"This presentation will share the early results of the excavation, showcasing some of the more fascinating finds. The advanced recording methods used to conduct the investigation will also be discussed, including the generation of highly detailed 3D representations of the site using photogrammetric techniques.

Richard Tuffin served an initial term as an archaeologist at Port Arthur between 2001 and 2007. In an unintentional reversal of 19th century norms, Richard transported himself to Scotland, where he worked at the coal face of commercial archaeology. He gladly took up the offer of Penitentiary Project archaeologist in 2015. Dr David Roe is Archaeology Manager with the Port Arthur Historic Site Management Authority and has been involved with archaeological management and research in the UK, Portugal, Russia, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, Pitcairn Island and Australia. They are both part of the UNE/ UTAS/PAHMSA Australian Research Council 'Landscapes of Punishment and Production' project with Prof. Martin Gibbs and A. Prof David Roberts of UNE.

For people off-campus, the presentation will be recorded and made available through the Archaeology Society’s Echo 360 page HERE.

CAA Australia's first Spring Institute

The first Spring Institute will be held from 4th – 8th September 2017 at the ANU’s Kioloa Coastal Campus, jointly organised by CAA Australia and the Department of Archaeology, University of Sydney. It will be an intensive, five day, small-group (limit 30), residential, informal meeting promoting information exchange, training, networking and collaboration around a number of digital themes.

Participation cost for the Spring Institute is $250 – this includes registration, accommodation and food for the five days. Travel bursaries will be available for student and low income participants to equalise travel costs.

For more information, please see: http://au.caa-international.org/spring-institute/

Gretel Boswijk

This might be on the cusp (in terms of NZ timing) of what is considered Historical Archaeology, but ASHA readers may be interested in this new publication on using high resolution wigglematch radiocarbon dating. Palisade posts from a Waikato pa and construction were investigated, and were dated at 1768+-4 (95% probability). Article information and a link to the article can be found below.

Hogg, A., Gumbley, W., Boswijk, G., Petchey, F., Southon, J, Anderson, A., Roa, T., Donaldson, L. 2017. The first accurate and precise calendar dating of New Zealand Maori Pa, using Otahau Pa as a case study. Journal of Archaeological Science Reports 12, 124-133.

The article can be found at: https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1UTMg,rVDBGCvC

Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

Historical and Contact Archaeology in North Parramatta

A site currently being excavated in North Parramatta, New South Wales has found evidence of contact between European and local Indigenous peoples in fragments of glass. The excavators have also discovered evidence of leisure and ornamentation of the residents of the previous institutions located on the site.

For more information, please see the following link:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-02-21/artefacts-show-coexistence-between-aboriginals-and-europeans/8287950