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ASHA NEWS

Ian Evans

Tasmanian Evil-averting Marks

The Tasmanian Magic Project has released a video which aims to enlist the aid of the general public in finding evil-averting marks. It’s hoped the video will raise awareness of the existence of these marks on old houses and buildings and so aid in the re-discovery of the lost and secret history of magic in 19th-century Australia.

Several marks are illustrated and it is hoped that further marks and new reports of known marks will be passed to the Magic Project as a result of the video. People who watch the video are encouraged to get in touch if they have seen any magic marks. The video was produced by Ruth Hazleton, folklore researcher and musician of Melbourne.

The video can be seen here: https://youtu.be/tMmaWwrAXHY.

Issued by the Tasmanian Magic Project
PO Box 591
Mullumbimby NSW 2482
Phone 0455 173 456
Email evansthebook@gmail.com

School of Archaeology & Anthropology, ANU College of Arts and the Social Sciences, compiled by Richard Morrison

Triabunna Field School, Tasmania

As reported previously this 2nd field work season was to be undertaken by Dr Ash Lenton, ANU, for undergraduates from there but also from the University of Sydney, in January and February 2017. It was to focus on the investigation of a military barracks which serviced the adjacent Maria Island convict settlement in the 1840’s.

A news report on the project can be found here
For more information see also:
http://sydney.edu.au/news-opinion/news/2017/01/23/student-dig-explores-tasmanian-barracks-of-colonial-regiment.html

https://m.facebook.com/TriabunnaBarracksANU.Dig/

Twitter #TriabunnaBarracks
Canberra Archaeological Society, compiled by Richard Morrison

Explore Red Hill Camp

In 2016 Ngunnawal and Ngambri families worked with ANU archaeology students and local residents to uncover the Aboriginal history of a small park in Manuka. The upcoming Heritage Week event, Explore Red Hill Camp: Canberra’s ‘Last Ngunnawal Campsite’ will focus on the outcomes of the Red Hill Camp excavation (2016) which was undertaken by Steve Skitmore of ANU, and will explore the stories of the site through a short walk and a story-telling journey with Ngunnawal and Ngambri elders.

It will be free and held at 3.00-4.30pm on Saturday 22 April 2017 at the Corner Durville Crescent & Flinders Way /77 Flinders Way, Griffith, ACT.

Register at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/explore-red-hill-camp-canberras-last-ngunnawal-campsite-tickets-31900978686  

 



Rosanna Ditton


Oral History Australia Biennial Conference

The conference theme is Moving memories: oral history in a global world and promises to stimulate interesting discussion amongst participants. International guest speakers include Indira Chowdhury (India) and Dalia Leinarte (Lithuania).

Venue: SMC Conference and Function Centre, Sydney
Date: 13 – 16 September 2017
Website: https://dcconferences.eventsair.com/ohac17/cs
Please click here to download the call for papers flyer.

Call for papers close: 28 February 2017
Registration opens: 31 March 2017
Contact: Conference Secretariat: DC Conferences, 02 9954 4400 or ohac2017@dcconferences.com.au

Originally posted on the Lost Trades Fair website

Rundell and Rundell Lost Trades Fair
Saturday 11th - Sunday 12th March 2017
Kyneton Racecourse, 10am - 4pm

The Lost Trades Fair was born on the principle that people are fascinated when artisans and craftspeople openly demonstrate their skills and share their knowledge. Meet the makers; armourers, chairmakers, coopers, blacksmiths, leatherworkers, silversmiths and stonemasons; over 100 traditional artisans - start planning a road trip to the fabulous central highlands, Victoria and enjoy a 'lost weekend' at the most inspiring event you will experience in 2017.

For more information, please see: http://www.losttrades.info/
Bronwyn Woff

The ASHA Blog Editor and the ASHA Committee would like to take this opportunity to welcome you to the ASHA Blog.

The blog replaces the long-running ASHA Newsletter as a way for members to receive information regarding Australasian Historical Archaeology. It aims to encourage the sharing of information between ASHA members, members of the wider archaeological community, and the general public. The blog contains information regarding archaeological research, excavations and upcoming events, and will be the platform for posting our Artefact of the Month articles.

Each post will be tagged with topics as appropriate, and visitors to the blog can search using these tags under the Recent Postssection on the left hand side of the page. As yet, this option is not available for mobile devices. These tags include the region which the post refers to, as well as various broad topics, for example "Glass" or "Research".

Visitors can also subscribe to receive updates about the ASHA Blog at the bottom of the blog page.

We hope that you enjoy reading up-to-date information via our blog. If you wish to make a submission, please email your regional representative (the details of which are found here)  or by emailing the Editor at: newsletter@asha.org.au

Happy reading!

Bronwyn Woff
ASHA Blog Editor
newsletter@asha.org.au
Originally posted on the ANMM website

The Australian National Maritime Museum, with the Australian Association for Maritime History have opened nominations for two maritime history prizes.

The major prize is named in honour of the late Professor Frank Broeze (1945–2001) of the University of Western Australia, who has been called the pre-eminent maritime historian of his generation. Professor Broeze was a founding member of the Australian Association for Maritime History, inaugural editor of its scholarly journal The Great Circle, and introduced Australia’s first university course on maritime history. He was the author of many works on Australian maritime history, including the landmark Island Nation (1997), helping to redefine the field in broader terms tan ships, sailors and sea power. He reached into economic, business, social and urban histories to make maritime history truly multidisciplinary.

The 2017 Frank Broeze Memorial Maritime History Prize of $4,000
To be awarded for a book treating any aspect of maritime history relating to or affecting Australia, written or co-authored by an Australian citizen or permanent resident, and published between 1 January 2015 and 31 December 2016. The book should be published in Australia, although titles written by Australian authors but published overseas may be considered at the discretion of the judges. The prize is open to Australian authors or co-authors of a book-length monograph or compilation of their own works. Edited collections of essays by multiple contributors are not eligible.

The Australian Community Maritime History Prize of $1,000
To be awarded to a regional or local museum or historical society for a publication (book, booklet, educational resource kit, DVD or other media) relating to an aspect of maritime history of that region or community, and published between 1 January 2015 and 31 December 2016. The winner will also receive a year’s subscription to the Australian Association for Maritime History.

For instructions on how to nominate and information on the judging process, please see:
http://www.anmm.gov.au/get-involved/grants-and-awards/history-prizes
Information compiled by Bronwyn Woff

Test excavations have begun at the site of the new Queens Wharf casino, hotel and entertainment complex in Brisbane. The test excavations are being carried out in order to investigate the foundations of heritage buildings in the area. These investigations will inform proceedings for protecting the heritage buildings while works are carried out.

 

For more information, please see:

http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/heritage-work-begins-at-queens-wharf-ahead-of-construction-20170116-gtse8j.html

 

Bronwyn Woff

Excavations have recently concluded at Triabunna, which is situated on Tasmania's east coast near Maria Island. The excavations were carried out as part of a joint ANU and University of Sydney field school. Students participated in the excavations around what are believed to be military barracks.

For more information, please see the following:
https://www.facebook.com/TriabunnaBarracks.Dig/
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-01-18/triabunna-archaeological-dig-unearthing-untold-stories/8191066

A four-part radio series was produced by ABC Hobart centering on Triabunna and the excavations findings:
https://soundcloud.com/936-abc-hobart/digging-up-triabunnas-past-part-1
https://soundcloud.com/936-abc-hobart/digging-up-triabunnas-past-part-2
https://soundcloud.com/936-abc-hobart/learning-in-a-trench-in-triabunna
https://soundcloud.com/936-abc-hobart/what-1800s-children-learned-over-breakfast

Sarah Hayes

Absinthe Bottles and Prostitution in Early Colonial Melbourne

This absinthe bottle is one of 10 recovered from a rubbish pit associated with Mrs Bond’s grocer in Melbourne’s notorious Little Lon district. Absinthe, or the green fairy, was a hallucinogenic alcoholic drink available from the 18th century but reaching new heights of popularity in bohemian Paris in the late-19th century; coinciding nicely with the timing of Mrs Bond’s grocery. But was it a grocery? The absinthe bottles, along with French champagne bottles and 300 oyster shells, have led us to reinterpret the use of this site. Mrs Bond had been operating brothels in Little Lon for years and the historical documents gave the impression she had given it all up to run a respectable grocery business. The artefacts tell a different story. It seems her grocery was actually a cover for a high class brothel.

Sarah's professional facebook page, where this information was originally posted, can be found at:
https://www.facebook.com/SarahHResearch/?fref=ts

(Photos by Bronwyn Woff)