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ASHA NEWS

Michael Lever

Following the success of our first session, the NSW Archaeology Reading Group will be meeting again at 6.30pm on Monday 6th March at Unit 94 / 120 Saunders Street, Pyrmont. We will be reading the following three articles suggested by attendants at the last meet. They are all fairly brief and there is no pressure to read all three – reading one article and engaging in discussion is fine. If you have any difficulty locating these items please contact me for a PDF.

While these articles are all on Aboriginal heritage and archaeology, the group is open to read any topics that attendants propose. If you plan on attending, feel free to bring snacks or drinks to share and please do RSVP to Michael.d.lever@gmail.com, or 0413 564 995.

Bradley, J. 2008. When a Stone Tool is a Dingo, in B. David (ed) Handbook of Landscape Archaeology. P633-637

Greer, S. 2010. Heritage and empowerment: community‐based Indigenous cultural heritage in northern Australia. International Journal of Heritage Studies, 16:1-2

White, B. 2012. Minimum Analytical Nodules and lithic activities at site W2, Hunter Valley, New South Wales. Australian Archaeology. 75. 25-36

Bronwyn Woff and Cathy Tucker

Please join us for a tour of Museum Victoria's dedicated storage facility on Friday 17th March 2017 followed by lunch at the Post Office Hotel in Coburg.



Attendees of the last tour enjoyed exploring the various objects of State significance at the storage facility late in 2016. Spots are limited so make sure you sign up soon!

See the following blog post for more on what the attendees of the last tour experienced:

http://www.asha.org.au/news/museum_store_tour


 


Bronwyn Woff, Research Associate, La Trobe University

The fragment of glass illustrated in the images below was found in the 1988 excavation season of Melbourne's Little Lon district. This area was reported to be a slum, with a mixed use of domestic and light industrial lots.


Crown glass window pane fragment. LL71844 Historical Archaeology Collection, Museums Victoria. Images: Bronwyn Woff

The glass fragment is the central panel of a spun crown glass sheet, which was created in the manufacture of glass for window panes. Hot glass was spun on a pontil rod so that it slowly spread into a large disc up to 1400mm wide. Because of this manufacturing technique, the glass was thicker at the centre than at the edges. The majority of glass imported to Australia from Britain before 1834 was manufactured in this way, as taxes and duties were lower than for other manufacturing techniques (Boow, 1991 pp.100-102). This glass fragment can be dated to between 1788 and the 1860s (Boow, 1991 pp.100-104).

Crown Glass being spun flat by glass makers. Image from “Glass in Architecture and Decoration” by Raymond McGrath & A.C. Frost, 2nd Edition, London, 1961 [1937], p. 75 via : https://blog.mcny.org/2014/11/25/whats-in-an-artifact-crown-glass/    (accessed February 28, 2017.)

In this case, the whole sheet was used and the central section was cut into a pane of glass with the "bulls eye" pontil mark in place. In some cases, these were ground out or otherwise modified so that the pontil mark was not evident, but in this example the snapped off pontil mark protrudes at least 5mm from the flat glass. One straight-cut edge of the window pane is present on the shortest side. Because of the flaw present in the glass, this window pane would have been much cheaper to purchase than a thin, outer fragment and this may reflect the buying power of the owners of the residential property where it was found at Little Lon.

 


"Spectactular clear bullseye glass panes in an English house" via: http://www.peachridgeglass.com/2012/04/the-bulls-eye-glass-pane/  (accessed February 28, 2017)


Bronwyn is currently working as a subcontracting archaeologist, cataloger and analyst. She is contactable via: bronwyn_woff@outlook.com.au
Engineers Australia, compiled by Richard Morrison

2016 John Monash Medal - Engineers Australia

This national award was presented to Keith Baker, ACT resident, chartered professional electrical engineer, post-graduate qualifications in cultural heritage management and heritage consultant, in January 2017 for his ‘outstanding contribution in raising awareness and conservation of the ACT’s heritage, and providing national leadership in the promotion of engineering heritage’. Keith had previously authored A century of Canberra engineering in 2013 (published by the Canberra Division, Engineers Australia).

For more information please see:
http://newsroom.engineersaustralia.org.au/news/member-profile/act-resident-receives-prestigious-national-engineering-award

http://www.canberratimes.com.au/act-news/canberra-man-awarded-national-medal-for-recording-engineering-heritage-20170119-gtumnu.html

Ian Evans

Tasmanian Evil-averting Marks

The Tasmanian Magic Project has released a video which aims to enlist the aid of the general public in finding evil-averting marks. It’s hoped the video will raise awareness of the existence of these marks on old houses and buildings and so aid in the re-discovery of the lost and secret history of magic in 19th-century Australia.

Several marks are illustrated and it is hoped that further marks and new reports of known marks will be passed to the Magic Project as a result of the video. People who watch the video are encouraged to get in touch if they have seen any magic marks. The video was produced by Ruth Hazleton, folklore researcher and musician of Melbourne.

The video can be seen here: https://youtu.be/tMmaWwrAXHY.

Issued by the Tasmanian Magic Project
PO Box 591
Mullumbimby NSW 2482
Phone 0455 173 456
Email evansthebook@gmail.com

School of Archaeology & Anthropology, ANU College of Arts and the Social Sciences, compiled by Richard Morrison

Triabunna Field School, Tasmania

As reported previously this 2nd field work season was to be undertaken by Dr Ash Lenton, ANU, for undergraduates from there but also from the University of Sydney, in January and February 2017. It was to focus on the investigation of a military barracks which serviced the adjacent Maria Island convict settlement in the 1840’s.

A news report on the project can be found here
For more information see also:
http://sydney.edu.au/news-opinion/news/2017/01/23/student-dig-explores-tasmanian-barracks-of-colonial-regiment.html

https://m.facebook.com/TriabunnaBarracksANU.Dig/

Twitter #TriabunnaBarracks
Canberra Archaeological Society, compiled by Richard Morrison

Explore Red Hill Camp

In 2016 Ngunnawal and Ngambri families worked with ANU archaeology students and local residents to uncover the Aboriginal history of a small park in Manuka. The upcoming Heritage Week event, Explore Red Hill Camp: Canberra’s ‘Last Ngunnawal Campsite’ will focus on the outcomes of the Red Hill Camp excavation (2016) which was undertaken by Steve Skitmore of ANU, and will explore the stories of the site through a short walk and a story-telling journey with Ngunnawal and Ngambri elders.

It will be free and held at 3.00-4.30pm on Saturday 22 April 2017 at the Corner Durville Crescent & Flinders Way /77 Flinders Way, Griffith, ACT.

Register at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/explore-red-hill-camp-canberras-last-ngunnawal-campsite-tickets-31900978686  

 



Rosanna Ditton


Oral History Australia Biennial Conference

The conference theme is Moving memories: oral history in a global world and promises to stimulate interesting discussion amongst participants. International guest speakers include Indira Chowdhury (India) and Dalia Leinarte (Lithuania).

Venue: SMC Conference and Function Centre, Sydney
Date: 13 – 16 September 2017
Website: https://dcconferences.eventsair.com/ohac17/cs
Please click here to download the call for papers flyer.

Call for papers close: 28 February 2017
Registration opens: 31 March 2017
Contact: Conference Secretariat: DC Conferences, 02 9954 4400 or ohac2017@dcconferences.com.au

Originally posted on the Lost Trades Fair website

Rundell and Rundell Lost Trades Fair
Saturday 11th - Sunday 12th March 2017
Kyneton Racecourse, 10am - 4pm

The Lost Trades Fair was born on the principle that people are fascinated when artisans and craftspeople openly demonstrate their skills and share their knowledge. Meet the makers; armourers, chairmakers, coopers, blacksmiths, leatherworkers, silversmiths and stonemasons; over 100 traditional artisans - start planning a road trip to the fabulous central highlands, Victoria and enjoy a 'lost weekend' at the most inspiring event you will experience in 2017.

For more information, please see: http://www.losttrades.info/
Bronwyn Woff

The ASHA Blog Editor and the ASHA Committee would like to take this opportunity to welcome you to the ASHA Blog.

The blog replaces the long-running ASHA Newsletter as a way for members to receive information regarding Australasian Historical Archaeology. It aims to encourage the sharing of information between ASHA members, members of the wider archaeological community, and the general public. The blog contains information regarding archaeological research, excavations and upcoming events, and will be the platform for posting our Artefact of the Month articles.

Each post will be tagged with topics as appropriate, and visitors to the blog can search using these tags under the Recent Postssection on the left hand side of the page. As yet, this option is not available for mobile devices. These tags include the region which the post refers to, as well as various broad topics, for example "Glass" or "Research".

Visitors can also subscribe to receive updates about the ASHA Blog at the bottom of the blog page.

We hope that you enjoy reading up-to-date information via our blog. If you wish to make a submission, please email your regional representative (the details of which are found here)  or by emailing the Editor at: newsletter@asha.org.au

Happy reading!

Bronwyn Woff
ASHA Blog Editor
newsletter@asha.org.au