asha

ASHA NEWS

Originally posted by Elizabeth Foley

Registration is still open for the Victorian Archaeology Colloquium, to be held at La Trobe University on Friday 3 February 2017. Registration is inclusive of morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea. Please register via https://latrobe.onestopsecure.com/onestopweb/LTUEv/createbooking?e=ASSC_EV49

Program
8:30 Registration
9:00-9:30 Welcome to Country
9:30-10:00 Introduction
10:00-11:00 Session 1: Approaches: Methods and objectives
11:00-11:30 Morning tea
11:30-12:30 Session 2: Site-specific investigations
12:30-1:30 Lunch
1:30-2:30 Session 3: Regional Victoria
2:30-3:00 Afternoon tea
3:00-4:00 Session 4: Living on the edge: detection, recording and meaning of Aboriginal archaeological sites in Victoria
4:00-4:30 Conclusion

Original post by Emmy Frost

Applications are now open for the Victorian Archaeology Colloquium.

The annual Colloquium will be held on 3 February 2017 at the Institute for Advanced Study, La Trobe University, Bundoora. Traditional Owners residing over 100 km away are eligible to apply for a travel bursary to attend. Colloquium registerations are available on the following link:

https://latrobe.onestopsecure.com/onestopweb/LTUEv/createbooking?e=ASSC_EV49

A Pre-colloquium workshop is also available, which will provide participants with basic information for identifing and describing common stone types. To register for the pre-colloquium workshop, please proceed to

https://latrobe.onestopsecure.com/onestopweb/LTUEv/createbooking?e=ASSC_EV50

Originally shared by Iain Stuart

Australia ICOMOS, DOCOMOMO Australia, NSW Chapter AIA SYDNEY TALK SERIES


Time & Date: Thursday 12th January, 2017 5.30pm for 6pm start

Cost: Members $10, non-members $15 payable at GML

Venue: GML Heritage Level 6, Australia Council Building, 372 Elizabeth Street, Surry Hills, 2010
Please report to the reception desk on the Australia Council Ground Floor on arrival to be ticked off on the list and to obtain a Visitors Pass

RSVP: by Wednesday 11th January 2016 via email to janev@gml.com.au.

 Stephen Hughes is Secretary-general of the International Committee for the Conservation of the Industrial Heritage (TICCIH - 2012 to present) and has been Vice-President of ICOMOS-UK since 2011. In 1996 he wrote the first of the ICOMOS/TICCIH World Heritage Studies (on canals) which has facilitated the inscription of a series of World Heritage studies internationally including one he subsequently wrote on Colliery Monuments (2003). He has written, edited or co-authored several books including the World Heritage nomination document for Pontcysyllte Aqueduct and Canal (2008); a book on a designer of Italianate Workers’ Chapels in mining settlements - Thomas Thomas (2006). The Archaeology of the Welsh Uplands (2003); Copperopolis: Landscapes at the international centre of Copper-smelting in Swansea (2000); books on the Engineering and Architecture of Collieries (1996) and of Lighthouses in Wales (1994); The Archaeology of an Early Railways (1990) and A Guide and Study in Waterways Archaeology (1988). He has organised international partnerships on mining regeneration and the production of interpretative animations (cartoons) of the industrial heritage. Stephen was Projects Director for the Royal Commission on the Ancient & Historical Monuments of Wales, U.K., until 2015.

 

TICCIH (The International Committee on the Conservation of the Industrial Heritage) has been informally advising the ICOMOS World Heritage Centre on the Industrial Heritage since 2000. In 1996 TICCIH & ICOMOS jointly published the first of 20 Thematic Studies for the World Heritage Convention on Canals, which can all be found on the ICOMOS website. In November 2011 ‘The Dublin Principles’: Joint ICOMOS-TICCIH Principles for the Conservation of Industrial Heritage Sites, Structures, Areas and Landscapes were adopted by the ICOMOS General Assembly in Paris. A new MOU between TICCIH & ICOMOS was signed in Florence in 2014, and action is underway.

Original post by Annie Muir

Members may be interested to hear of a new partnership between Heritage Victoria and Google Cultural Institute. This partnership provides a new way for HV to share their collections with people across the world, via a free online platform.

For more information, please follow the link below.

https://www.google.com/culturalinstitute/beta/partner/heritage-victoria

Tour group exploring the History and Technology Store
Tour group exploring the History and Technology Store
Catherine Tucker,  Andrea Murphy and Bronwyn Woff

On Thursday 8 December 2016 members of ASHA and other non-member historic archaeologists and historians attended a guided tour of Museums Victoria’s storage facility in Melbourne’s northern suburbs, organised by ASHA committee members Bronwyn Woff and Catherine Tucker.

The storage facility provides tailored storage areas for objects when they are not on display at Museums Victoria’s three campuses at Melbourne Museum (Carlton), the Immigration Museum (CBD) and Scienceworks (Spotswood).

Mr Veegan McMasters (Senior Coordinator, Collections Storage and Logistics, Strategic Collection Management Department) showed us some of the 17 million objects housed by Museums Victoria – an extraordinary array of objects including everything from taxidermy animals, machinery, clothing and textiles, aeroplanes, to barbed wire and fencing equipment, handbags, signage, tools and household equipment through the ages. Veegan also explained the location system used by organisation, by which every object is barcoded and the location recorded on a live location system.

Artefacts excavated from the Commonwealth Block - land bounded by Lonsdale, Little Lonsdale, Spring and Exhibition Streets, and owned by the Commonwealth Government since 1948 - in Melbourne's CBD is also housed at this facility. The collection consists of artefacts from various excavations from 1988 to the present, and holds the largest nineteenth century urban historical archaeology collection in the world.

Research Assistant Bronwyn Woff explaining the Historical Archaeology Collection
Research Assistant Bronwyn Woff explaining the Historical Archaeology Collection

The resource is incredible and is certainly something that archaeologists from around Australia could consult. If anyone is interested in accessing the collection, images of some of the artefacts are found on Museums Victoria's “Collections Online” website. The search is easy to use, and you can filter by Collecting Area eg: Historical Archaeology, or search all of the Museums collections. For in-person viewing of the collection, access may be able to be organised through the Discovery centre. Links for these two sites can be found below:

Original post by CHNT Conference Organisers

The 22nd International Conference on Cultural Heritage and New Technologies (CHNT 2017) will take place at the City Hall of Vienna, Austria from 8-10 November 2017.

The main topic of this year:Urban Archaeology and Integration – Combining archaeology, history, and new technologies.

The aim of this conference is to enhance the collaboration between historians and archaeologists and related disciplines using new technologies and to showcase best practice applications in multidisciplinary research. The conference organizers invite sessions dealing with one of the following topics or a combination thereof:

Application of effective 3D-methods for the reconstruction of buildings, integrating archaeological excavation data with historical sources including images, thus increasing our understanding of the past

Additional digital methods for the combined visualisation of archaeological and historical data (e.g. monitoring changes and preservation of archaeological monuments based on historical images)

Application of new technologies to assess the archaeological record based on historical data (maps, tax returns, inventories, ship wreck lists, etc.) and/or combining historical sources and archaeological data in a geographical information system for recording the history of urban or rural landscapes

Games, apps, and teaching software integrating archaeological and historical knowledge

Historical data as a basis for checking or validating digital tools applied in archaeology and vice versa

Dealing with inscriptions (including cuneiform, hieroglyphs and symbols): digital methods for enhancing readability (e.g. Reflectance Transformation Imaging), pattern recognition of letters or pictograms, comparison of hand writing (same author?)

Statistical analysis investigating the correlation between historical place names and archaeological evidence


Submissions of Proposals for Sessions, Round Tables and Advanced Archaeological Trainings are due by 30 January 2017. For information on how to submit a proposal, visit the call for sessionswebpage.

Original post by Mary Casey

Members may be interested to note that membership applications for the Australian Capital Territory's Heritage Council are now open. For more information please follow the link below:

http://www.environment.act.gov.au/heritage/about-us/act_heritage_council/expressions-of-interest-for-membership

ASHA logo
ASHA logo
ASHA News

Following the 2016 ASHA conference in New Zealand, a new committee has been elected. ASHA wishes to thank the outgoing committee for their dedication, and welcomes new members to the committee.

For details of committee members and roles, please see the "Committee" page at: http://www.asha.org.au/committee.html     

ASHA logo
ASHA logo
ASHA News

The 2016 Annual General Meeting of the Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology will be held on:
Friday, 30 September 2016 at 4:00 pm

in the Camelot Room, Chateau on the Park,
189 Deans Avenue,
Riccarton,
Christchurch
NEW ZEALAND.

Committee Nominations

Nominations for the 2016-2017 ASHA Committee are now open. The election of the 2016-17 ASHA Committee will be conducted during the Annual General Meeting. Nominations will close at 5.00pm (AEST) Friday 26 August 2016.

To nominate for a committee position, download a nomination form here and send it to the ASHA Returning Officer (address on the form). Further information on the committee roles is available here.

Each member is entitled to appoint another member as proxy by notice given to the Secretary not less than 24 hours before the time for holding of the meeting. You can download a proxy form here.

Return the form to the ASHA Secretary by mail on or before 5pm, Friday 23 September, or forms may be delivered in person to Caitlin D'Gluyas by your appointed Proxy at the conference no later than 12.30 pm, Friday 30 September 2016.

View of ‘Temperance Lodge’ (HCWA3729) from Company Road (Photo: Hetherington, February 2015).
Gray’s Store (HCWA1153) following restoration by National Trust and Palassis Architects in 1977 (Photo: Hetherington, February 2015)
Melissa Hetherington

Through the Eyes of Henry Gray: Investigating the influence of the Temperance Movement and Wesleyan Methodism on the Greenough Flats, Western Australia, 1839 – 1900

A new research project has just begun on the historic settlement on the Greenough Flats, which are situated approximately 400km north of Perth, and 25km south of Geraldton, Western Australia.

In Western Australia, a recommendation for the establishment of a temperance society in King George Sound (Albany) was put forward as early as 1833, on the basis that ‘temperance societies have been found to be highly beneficial by discouraging the use of ardent spirits’ (The Perth Gazette, 19th October 1833, p.167-8). Temperance advocates were aiming to combat numerous issues in the colony, such as increases in crime rates and illness, which were linked to drunkenness. Temperance advocates with religious motivations also tended to focus on making the connection between immorality and drunkenness. In this way, motivations behind the temperance movement were multi-layered.
This research aims to explore the nature of the temperance movement in Western Australia by examining social issues related to drunkenness and the motivations that lay behind the establishment of temperance and teetotaller societies in Western Australia. This research will also explore the ways in which the temperance movement influenced secular and religious organisations and commercial enterprise in the Western Australian colony by examining what motivated individuals to establish a lodge of the Independent Order of Good Templars (I.O.G.T.) in Perth and the Midwest (Geraldton & Greenough), what motivated settlers to join the movement, and whether members of the I.O.G.T. achieved the outcomes they set out to achieve. Particular focus will be given to Charles Watson Gray, who established the I.O.G.T. in Western Australia, and Charles’ father, Henry Gray, who established a network of general stores (H. Gray & Co.) in Greenough & Geraldton, and whose personal and commercial interests were influenced by his support for and involvement with the I.O.G.T.

Beginning in November 2015, archaeological investigations will be conducted at Henry Gray’s general store and the Temperance Lodge, which are two National Trust properties located along Company Road, on the Greenough Flats. This research has been initiated through collaboration with the National Trust (NTWA), which manages 19 historic places on the Greenough Flats. The NTWA wish to gain a greater understanding of the heritage places in Western Australia that have come into their custodianship.

Gray’s Store (HCWA1153) following restoration by National Trust and Palassis Architects in 1977 (Photo: Hetherington, February 2015) Gray’s Store (HCWA1153) following restoration by National Trust and Palassis Architects in 1977 (Photo: Hetherington, February 2015).

View of ‘Temperance Lodge’ (HCWA3729) from Company Road (Photo: Hetherington, February 2015). View of ‘Temperance Lodge’ (HCWA3729) from Company Road (Photo: Hetherington, February 2015).

Facebook has also been used to connect and communicate with local residents, which has made it possible to connect with the wider community, including descendants of the settlers on the Greenough Flats. Descendants of Henry Gray and William Moore have already contributed photographs and documents from private collections, which have been of vital importance to understanding the history of Gray’s Store. Many of those who already take an interest in the history of the Greenough Flats settlement are familiar with the Pioneer Museum and Gardens in Greenough. Therefore, the project has been advertised through the museum’s Facebook page, to raise awareness about the upcoming fieldwork in Greenough, to spark further community interest and participation in this research.

Advertising the project on the Greenough Museum and Gardens Facebook page.
Advertising the project on the Greenough Museum and Gardens Facebook page.

If you are interested in volunteering for the excavations in 2016, or wish to gain experience in historical archaeology, send an email to Melissa at: melissa.hetherington@research.uwa.edu.au


This blog first appeared in the ASHA Newsletter 2015, vol 45, no 3, pp 10-12.

Share this post: