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ASHA NEWS

Compiled by Blog Editor

A reminder that National Archaeology Week (20-26 May 2018) is fast approaching!

If you have an event you wish to advertise, or if you want to check out what's on, go to: http://www.archaeologyweek.com/ where you'll find a state-by-state events list. You can also find National Archaeology Week on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeologyweek/

The state representatives are:
NSW – Helen Nicholson - nhelen@tpg.com.au
Qld – Paddy Waterson - paddy.waterson@gmail.com
SA – Antoinette Hennessy - antoinette.hennessy@flinders.edu.au
Tas – Samuel Dix – samuel.dix@griffithuni.edu.au
Vic – Caroline Spry – c.spry@latrobe.edu.au
WA – Wendy Reynen – wa@australianarchaeology.com

And if you are posting on social media, please remember to use the hashtag #2018NAW

Written by Richard Morrison

A joint half-day event with the Canberra Archaeological Society and ASHA will be held at the National Museum of Australia, Canberra, on Saturday 14 April 2018 in ACT Region Heritage Week. Speakers will include Professor Sue O’Connor (ANU), Dr Mike Pearson AO, Professor June Ross (UNE), Dr Tristen Jones (ANU) and Dr Duncan Wright (ANU). There will be a Q&A panel of the speakers at the end of the talks. For more information please see: https://maritimecasasha.eventbrite.com.au

Compiled by Blog Editor

A special edition of the International Journal of Historical Archaeology was published in March 2018, focusing on 'Marvellous Melbourne'. Volume 22, Issue 1 was edited by Susan Lawrence, Peter Davies and Jeremy Smith and can be found here: https://link.springer.com/journal/10761/22/1/page/1. The special issue contains 11 articles, as follows:

Introduction: The Archaeology of “Marvellous Melbourne” – Susan Lawrence, Peter Davies, Jeremy Smith

Bottle Merchants at A’Beckett Street, Melbourne (1875-1914): New Evidence for the Light Industrial Trade of Bottle Washing – Adrienne Ellis, Bronwyn Woff

Salvage Archaeology in Melbourne’s CBD: Reflections upon Documentary Sources and the Role of Prefabricated Buildings in Construction of the “Instant City” of Gold-Rush-Era Melbourne – Geoff Hewitt, Natalie Paynter, Meg Goulding, Sharon Lane, Jodi Turnbull, Bronwyn Woff

Reconstructing Landscape: Archaeological Investigations of the Royal Exhibition Buildings Western Forecourt, Melbourne – Janine Major, Charlotte Smith, Richard Mackay

The City Revealed: Reflections on 25 Years of Archaeology in Melbourne. Lessons from the Past and Future Challenges – Jeremy Smith

Langlands Iron Foundry, Flinders Street, Melbourne - Sarah Myers, Sarah Mirams, Tom Mallett

A Golden Opportunity: Mayor Smith and Melbourne’s Emergence as a Global City - Sarah Hayes

Melbourne: The Archaeology of a World City - Susan Lawrence, Peter Davies

Working-Class Consumer Behavior in “Marvellous Melbourne” and Buenos Aires, The “Paris of South America” – Pamela Ricardi

The Other Side of the Coin: Subsurface Deposits at the Former Royal Melbourne Mint – Ian Travers

Insights of Afro-Latin American Archaeology – Kathryn E Sampeck


Compiled by Blog Editor

A reminder to members that submissions for the ASHA journal Australasian Historical Archaeology are due on 31 March. For more information see: http://www.asha.org.au/submission-information.html

The Sydney Historical Archaeology Practitioners (SHAP) Workshop has also put out a call for sessions/papers for the event on 18th May 2018. For more information see: www.archaeologyweek.com/

Written by The Dry Stone Wall Association of Australia

The Dry Stone Walls Association of Australia (DSWAA) are holding a weekend away at Bathurst, NSW that  ASHA members may be interested in:

Weekend away at Bathurst, NSW, May 11-13 2018
Planning is well underway for a fabulous weekend of heritage and discovery in and around Bathurst. We start with drinks at the magnificent Abercrombie House; built in the 1870s by the Stewarts - pioneers of Bathurst. On the Bridle Track you can imagine yourself as a drover on horseback heading up the narrow track to the village at Hill End, the beautiful Turon River below.

It's also a rare trades weekend at Bathurst where we could see violin making, photo restoration, shingle splitting, lace and whip making, and much more - and of course our own dry stone wallers; Wayne Fox and Emma Knowles will be in action.

If you stay for Monday you will see Cox's Road - the original track across the Blue Mountains - and the historic Mayfield Gardens - a lovely property and garden rich in dsw.

For more information, please see: http://dswaa.org.au/bathurst-heritage-weekend-11-13-may/

Compiled by Blog Editor

Jeremy Smith, Principal Archaeologist at Heritage Victoria recently discussed the Wesley Church and Jones Lane excavation with ABC Saturday Breakfast Radio host Hilary Harper.

From the ABC Radio website: An archaeological dig on Lonsdale Street between Russell and Exhibition has shone a window into life in pre-Gold Rush era Melbourne, showing it was more diverse and vibrant than we might have imagined. Jeremy Smith, principal archaeologist for Heritage Victoria, told Hilary Harper why there were whole houses sitting two metres under street level.

A recording of the interview can be found here: www.abc.net.au/radio/melbourne/

Written by NZ Archaeology Week Committee

Kia ora. A reminder that New Zealand Archaeology Week 2018 will run from April 28-May 6.

New Zealand Archaeology Week is a week-long nationwide celebration of archaeological heritage co-ordinated by the New Zealand Archaeological Association (NZAA). The aim is to increase public awareness of archaeology and highlight the importance of protecting our archaeological heritage.

Our inaugural event in April 2017 was very successful, with over 40 events being run across the country, made possible by contributions from a number of museums and heritage organisations, councils, tangata whenua, universities and consultant archaeologists. For an up-to-date listing of events being run in 2018, keep an eye on our website:  https://nzarchaeology.org/news-events/national-archaeology-week

It's not too late to get involved either! If you have an idea for an event you would be willing and able to help run, we encourage you to get in touch with our hardworking national co-ordinator Kathryn via archaeologyweek@nzarchaeology.org


Written by Caiti D'Gluyas

The next ASHA reading group is being hosted by Casey and Lowe and will be held on 22nd March. This is a semi-regular (quarterly) opportunity to catch-up with other historical archaeologists and discuss themes of interest.

Topic: Historical Artefacts
Facilitator: Robyn Stocks, Senior Artefact Specialist, Casey and Lowe
Location: Casey and Lowe Offices, 51 Reuss Street, LEICHHARDT NSW 2040
Time: 6pm, Thursday 22nd March 2017

Primary Readings
Davies, P. 2005 ‘Writing Slates and Schooling in Victoria’, Australasian Historical Archaeology 23:63-69.
Gojak, D. & I. Stuart 1999 ‘The Potential for the Archaeological Study of Clay, Tobacco Pipes from Australian Sites’, Australasian Historical Archaeology 17:38-49.
Klippel, W.E. & G.F. Schroedl 1999 ‘African slave craftsmen and single-hole bone discs from Brimstone Hill, St Kitts, West Indies’, Post-Medieval Archaeology 33:22–232.

Secondary Readings
Varman, R.V.J. 1993 Bricks and Nails: Building Materials as Criteria for Dating in Sydney and Environs from 1788, A Documentary Survey and Assessment of Dating Potential, Unpublished PhD Thesis, University of Sydney. Available online at https://ses.library.usyd.edu.au/handle/2123/1205

Contact secretary@asha.org.au if you are finding it difficult to find the readings.

The event is free and open to anyone who is interested, however, RSVPs are essential (to secretary@asha.org.au), so please get in touch if you would like to come!


Written by National Trust QLD

The National Trust has been sentenced and The Trust Talks are going to gaol! Heritage is not only about elegant houses, sweeping vistas and iconic architecture – heritage places cover all spectrums of our society, including the not so palatable aspects. Gaols, detention centres, asylums and places of conflict all represent our culture’s Wounded Heritage. These wounded places present unique challenges to those who manage their interpretation, access and conservation. Each place manager approaches this challenge differently.

Join us for an evening of talks by renowned Australian heritage managers who delve into this topic using case studies of Ned Kelly’s Glenrowan Inn and Melbourne’s Pentridge Prison. The evening will be held at Brisbane’s own wounded place: Boggo Road Gaol, with an optional staged tour available via separate booking.

The evening will include the opportunity to network with friends and colleagues, drinks and light canapes on arrival, the talk, and National Trust gift bag. This is an event not to be missed!

Our esteemed speakers include:
Libby Blamey - Historian, Lovell Chen Architects
Dr Susan McIntyre-Tamwoy - International cultural heritage consultant, Extent Heritage
Jane Alexander - Heritage Advocacy Advisor, The National Trust of Australia (Queensland)

Boggo Road Gaol will present an optional tour of the gaol before the Trust Talk. This is a chance to hear about the history of the gaol and understand what life was like for inmates. The tour will be at 5pm and run for half an hour for a special price of $11.50 for The Trust Talks attendees. Book your place now at - https://goo.gl/JoKCo5

For more information and tickets see: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/the-trust-talks-managing-the-heritage-of-wounded-places-tickets-43297394673

Written by the SHAP 2018 committee

The Sydney Historical Archaeology Practitioners’ (SHAP) Workshop, proudly organised by Extent Heritage, will be taking place once again this year during National Archaeology Week 2018. In this one-day workshop - to be held on Friday, 18 May 2018 at the Sydney Harbor YHA Big Dig Archaeology Education Centre - historical archaeologists, students and anyone interested in the discipline will come together to share ideas, recent projects, technology and developments for historical archaeology in NSW.

The theme of this year’s Workshop is: The Role of Archaeology in Heritage Conservation

Effective heritage conservation is crucial for the preservation, understanding and interpretation of the past. A number of recent developments across Australian major urban hubs and their surrounds resulted in the discovery of important and rare archaeological sites and artefacts that are able to provide a wealth of information. However, not all sites can be retained and not all of the artefacts can be displayed. This year’s SHAP is the opportunity for the industry practitioners to present the most recent archaeological discoveries and the ways they have been conserved. This gathering can also be an initiation for greater participation and presentation of Australian historical archaeology at the next ICOMOS GA and Scientific Symposium that will be hosted by Sydney in 2020.

This is a call for papers, presentations and demonstrations: if you have an exciting or relevant idea for a 15 to 20-minute presentation, please submit a 150 to 400 word abstract to Extent Heritage, as the submission information provided below. Creative session proposals are very welcome! There will also be a “Your Plug Spot” session, where you will be able to announce upcoming events, news, notices etc.

Tickets will be available in early April, so watch this space! Presenters, please remember that you must attend the conference if your paper or session is accepted. We look forward to hearing from you!

Important information for submissions:
Due date: Midnight on Monday, 2 April 2018
Submissions to: admin@extent.com.au
Please ensure submissions are relevant to the theme – we may ask you to make edits to your abstract to make it more relevant to Archaeology in Heritage Conservation

In your submission please include:
1. A subject line in your email: SHAP 2018
2. Presentation title
3. Abstract of 150 – 400 words
4. Presenter and co-authors’ names
5. Company affiliation
6. The form of your proposed session (e.g. paper presentation, workshop, demonstration, interactive session)

All abstracts are submitted for review only – not every abstract will be successfully placed into a session
Successful presenters must attend the workshop