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ASHA NEWS



Bronwyn Woff

This month’s Artefact of the Month an interesting looking bulk ink bottle with multiple impressed marks found on its body and base. This bottle was found on a historic excavation in the north of Melbourne’s CBD. It was excavated during works for a multi-story apartment building, from a c1850s+ light industrial site.


The ink bottle is made from stoneware, with a light brown salt glaze, and has an unusual square-shaped finish and spout. It stands 205mm tall, and has a diameter of 90mm. The bottle is well marked, with two makers marks (17 / DOULTON / LAMBETH and 3 / DOULTON / LAMBETH) on the base and on the body near the base respectively, as well as a registration diamond (IV / 28 / 9 Rd V / W) representing 28 March 1876 on the body near the base.

The two Doulton / Lambeth marks on the base and body of the bottle indicate that it was made by Doulton & Co. The company began as a partnership in the early 1800s, and worked from a pottery in Lambeth. From 1854 the company became Doulton and Co, and began using marks similar to those seen on this artefact. The company was granted a Royal Warrant in 1901, and from 1902 began adding ‘Royal’ to their mark, as well as a crown and lion (http://thepotteries.org/allpotters/356.htm).


Registration diamond marks such as these were used to denote that the design of an object, or the design of the decoration (for example, ceramic or textile patterns) were copyrighted to the designer. The diamond itself notes the date that the registration occurred, and therefore marks only a start date for that object. For more information on registration diamonds on ceramics, see A. Brooks An Archaeological Guide to British Ceramics in Australia 1788-1901 2005:74 which was published by The Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology and The La Trobe University Archaeology Program (although out-of-print, the complete book is available as a download for all current ASHA members through the members portal HERE).



The National Trust of Australia (Queensland)

Advocacy Alert – Lutwyche and Corinda The National Trust of Australia (Queensland) has requested a Stop Order, under Division 3, Section 154, of the Queensland Heritage Act, 1992 for two approved development applications at Lutwyche, Brisbane (DA #A004628058 and DA #A004756525). The two Development Applications relate to the property addresses of:

  • 32 LAURA ST LUTWYCHE QLD 4030;
  • 33 LAURA ST LUTWYCHE QLD 4030;
  • 36 LAURA ST LUTWYCHE QLD 4030;
  • 36A LAURA ST LUTWYCHE QLD 4030;
  • 37 LAURA ST LUTWYCHE QLD 4030;
  • 39 LAURA ST LUTWYCHE QLD 4030;
  • 30 THALIA CT CORINDA QLD 4075; and
  • 39 LOWERSON ST LUTWYCHE QLD 4030.

A request has been made for a Stop Order to prohibit work from starting on the stated activity contained in the two Development Applications.

22 December 2017
Letter to the Minister for the Environment and the Great Barrier Reef: Request to make Stop Order under the Queensland Heritage Act, 1992
Attachment A – 15 November 2017 – DEHP Letter of Support
Attachment B – 11 June 2010 – Letter from Office of the Lord Mayor Brisbane

The Threat: Earlier this year, Brisbane City Council approved via Code Assessable Development the proposed 8-storey retirement village on the property adjoining Conon. Conan, built in 1863 and lies to the east of Lutwyche Road. Unfortunately, heritage provisions were not triggered because the QHR listed boundary is not “adjacent” to the development site (under the, it has to be adjacent for the development to impact assessable). The grass lawn court has an adjoining boundary – but because it was owned by someone else when the QHR listing took place, it was not included in the heritage listed boundary.

Because the development was considered code assessable, there was no public notification of the project and the owners of Conon were not informed, nor were any other adjoining neighbours. There was no Statement of Heritage Impact prepared, thus the development was not designed to be sympathetic to Conon.

The development comprises a very large 8-storey retirement facility with most of the bulk and height on the side adjoining Conon. It will be clearly visible from inside the house and from within the grounds. It will tower behind the main elevation of Conon and significant views within the garden will be lost and overshadowed.

Trust Stance: The National Trust of Australia (Queensland) encourages careful development with good design – we showcase the results of this with our annual Heritage Awards. We understand that most developments are balancing a myriad of issues and constraints and we welcome a collaborative approach with developers to assist with refining their designs so that the significance of our heritage is no adversely impacted by development.

We are not opposed to a retirement facility being built on the proposed site. However, we believe that the proposed development should have impact assessable so that the significance of Conon and its setting is retained and not negatively affected.

The National Trust of Australia (Queensland) believes that Brisbane City Council’s method of approving this development via code assessable development and involving no notification or public notification should not have occurred. We recommend that a Stop Order be placed on the proposed development by the Minister for Environment and the Great Barrier Reef so that the following actions can be taken:

  • A thorough and robust Heritage Impact Statement be prepared by a qualified and suitably experienced heritage consultant;
  • Community consultation be undertaken;
  • A re-design of the project occurs, post Impact Statement, which provides an adequate buffer between the development and Conon and which steps the development back from the common boundary, so that the higher levels are further away from the significant setting and view lines.

Trust Action: For the first time in the history of the National Trust of Australia (Queensland), our organisation has requested that the Minister for the Environment and Great Barrier Reef place a Stop Order on the proposed development so that our recommended actions can take place. We have requested the Stop Order via email and presented the letter to eth Minister’s office. We have informed our members via email and Facebook, and alerted the media to our stance.

Development Applications:
DA# A004628058 Laura Street and Lowerson Street, Lutwyche
DA# A004756525 Laura Street, Lutwyche and Thalia Court, Corinda

Media Release: 22 December 2017

What you can do We need your help! Please read our letter to the Minister and then write your own letter to the Minister requesting that they implement our recommendations and issue the Stop Order. Every letter counts – it’s time to activate your voice!

Originally posted on the The National Trust of Australia (Queensland) website: www.nationaltrust.org.au



ASHA Blog Editor

Welcome to 2018 and a new year of the ASHA News blog! We at ASHA hope that you have had a relaxing holiday break and are looking forward to an exciting new year.

Here at the ASHA Blog, we will be continuing to provide our members and other interested parties with information about what is going on in the world of historical archaeology in Australia, New Zealand and the wider Pacific region. This means more posts about research, excavations, upcoming events and Artefacts of the Month!

You can sign up to the RSS feed, found on the left side of the blog, in order to receive an email update each time a new blog post hits the site. And remember: as part of the ASHA membership, you also receive a quarterly blog summary email, so sign up as a member HERE.

We are very proud to say that over the last year the blog has gained many viewers. Previous to the revamp in January 2017 the blog averaged 175 views per month. By the second half of 2017 the ASHA News blog  was averaging of 1,200 views per month! This year we are looking to recieve more submissions from historical archaeologists all over Australasia, so if you'd like some free exposure for your excavation or research, if you've got an upcoming event you'd like to advertise, or if you simply want to show off that wonderfully interesting artefact you've excavated please send an email to blog@asha.org.au or to your local regional representitive (whose email addresses can be found HERE).

We're excited to see what happens in Australasian Historical Archaeology in 2018, thanks for joining us!



Compiled by Richard Morrison

In October 2017, the Australian Government noted the discovery of the wreck of SS Macumba, sunk during the Second World War by Japanese air attack in the Arafura Sea north-east of Darwin. The wreckage has now been protected as a declared shipwreck under Australia’s Historic Shipwrecks Act. The merchant ship SS Macumba left Sydney, carrying supplies for Darwin. It never arrived, with two Japanese floatplanes bombing the vessel on 6 August 1943, resulting in the loss of three lives. See http://www.environment.gov.au/minister/frydenberg/media-releases/mr20171005.html



Compiled by Richard Morrison

Of relevance to members,from the Heritage Branch, Department of the Environment (Cwlth), the Abbotsford Convent, Yarra City, (Vic) and the Parramatta Female Factory and Institutions Precinct, (NSW), have been added to the National Heritage List (NHL) in the last few months.

Abbotsford Convent For more than 100 years the Convent, provided shelter, food, education and work for tens of thousands of women and children who experienced poverty, neglect and social disadvantage. Run by the Sisters of the Good Shepherd from 1863 to 1974, the Convent’s harsh conditions and hours of long work offered few comforts but provided shelter for desperate women and girls through the great Depression, two World Wars and other social upheavals.

Abbotsford Convent shows the role of religious and charitable institutions in Australia’s social and welfare history during the 19th and 20th centuries. The Convent’s asylum laundry is a rare surviving example of its type within Australia, reflecting the social attitudes of the time. For further information see http://www.environment.gov.au/heritage/places/national/abbotsford-convent

Parramatta Female Factory and Institutions Precinct From 1821 onwards, tens of thousands of women and children passed through this place in the care and custody of the state. The Precinct, which housed female convicts, orphaned children, and vulnerable girls and young women, is considered a leading example of a site which demonstrates Australia’s social welfare history.

Institutionalisation was a core part of Australia’s welfare system over two centuries, and the Precinct is outstanding in its capacity to tell the stories of women and children in institutions over the course of Australian history. It includes a rare surviving example of a convict female factory, and offers us the opportunity to find out even more about convicts experiences as a potential source of future archaeological finds. See http://www.environment.gov.au/heritage/places/national/parramatta-female-factory-and-institutions-precinct

Australia’s National Heritage List - the story so far by Australian Heritage Council (2017) - The NHL is now considered to be at a stage of development that the ‘remarkable story of our unique country is emerging with some clarity and impact’. This recent book, tells the stories of the places on the current list, and setting them in their wider context, and is intended to assist us to appreciate the nature of the journey so far, pointing towards ‘a future defined by the aspirations of the descendants of the continent’s first peoples and by the hopes and dreams of those who have come to live here from every country in the world’. See http://www.environment.gov.au/heritage/ahc/publications/australias-national-heritage-list         



Compiled by Richard Morrison

Googong Foreshores Cultural and Geodiversity Heritage Areas, Burra (NSW) were added to the Commonwealth Heritage List (CHL) in November 2017. Quoting from the summary statement of significance:
"The Googong Foreshores Cultural and Geodiversity Heritage Area has been listed as an important heritage place because of its ability to demonstrate the region’s pastoral, Aboriginal, geological and natural history, including through its archaeological deposits. The place demonstrates a number of settlement and pastoral practices used in the area and wider region. The place and the buildings within it demonstrate past living conditions, rare nineteenth and early twentieth century historic building techniques and later evolution in building practice ... The London Bridge Arch and London Bridge Homestead building group are also valued for their aesthetic appeal appreciated by the local community."

For more information, please see: www.environment.gov.au



Compiled by Richard Morrison

The 3rd field work season is to be undertaken by Dr Ash Lenton, ANU, for undergraduates from there but also from other Australian universities, 5-28 January 2018. It is to focus, as in previous seasons, on the investigation of a military barracks which serviced the adjacent Maria Island convict settlement in the 1840’s. Run by: School of Archaeology and Anthropology, Research School of Humanities & the Arts, ANU College of Arts and the Social Sciences, ANU.

For more information please see:
https://facebook.com/TriabunnaBarracks.Dig/     
http://archanth.cass.anu.edu.au/triabunna-barracks

Twitter #TriabunnaBarracks




Stephanie Moore

I was lucky enough last month to attend the joint ASHA/Interpretation Australia conference in Tasmania. Being new to both the ASHA conference world, and Tassie itself, Iain kindly suggested I might be the best person to provide a ‘review’ of this conference at our next Archaeology at the Pub gathering.


I kindly obliged and prepared myself with a small presentation of images from the trip and some thoughts on the how the conference ran, what I enjoyed, and what I would do differently next time. I presented this to a small, but enthusiastic crowd at The Shakespeare Hotel; many of whom had been at the conference and were happy to share their thoughts with me. We all settled in with a schooner and the increasingly popular complementary wedges to relive the scenery and the event.


We all generally agreed that the conference was thoroughly enjoyable, and that the travelling element provided a unique and interesting approach. We felt that there could have been a few less papers on the bill, as the long days made for an exhausting week – and we felt terrible for the poor presenters who drew the short straw of last session for the day! The presentations were varied in subject matter and style, and provided a good balance between the two disciplines. The opportunity to discuss with, and learn from, colleagues in the Interpretation field was also valuable, allowing many of us to walk away with renewed enthusiasm. There was unanimous agreement that the Shene Estate Gin Distillery was a winner as far as destinations went (both for the heritage value and the sneaky gin tasting). Overall, when considering the phenomenal 11 destinations and countless papers that were packed into this year’s conference, I would say it was a roaring success.

We hope to see you next time for Happy Hour beers and a plate of wedges!



Ross Bertinshaw

We received a question from the daughter of a local farmer in the Calingiri area of Western Australia confirmed the continuing presence of two wells constructed for the Benedictine monks of New Norcia in the 19th Century.


The original enquiry provided some photos and asked if they could be Benedictine wells. The pictures and their approximate locations were suggestive of New Norcia wells and the later provision of GPS coordinates then allowed the locations to be checked on Google Earth and against georeferenced Lease Plans from the 1890s.


From the georeferenced map it was possible to identify the wells as Toro and Jitocon both Benedictine wells. Abbot Rosendo Salvado held lease holdings surrounding the wells on which he ran the sheep that supported the monks and their missionary activities.

We know a little more about the wells. Toro Well was first dug in 1865 by well diggers Delany and Lavan, both ex-convicts. It was either renovated or a new well dug on the site in 1881 by unknown well sinkers. It was located on freehold title of 40 acres, which was granted in 1876.

Jitocon Well was dug in 1865 by Delaney and Higgins and was located on a freehold title of 10 acres first granted in 1864.

It is great to see agriculturalists and their offspring interested in the archaeology and history of their area and wanting to preserve it if possible.



National Trust of Australia (QLD)

"Head in the Cloudlands – is there too much idealism in heritage?” The Trust Talks, our speaker series aiming at opening the doors for innovation, collaboration and celebration of our heritage, is going underground into the Springhill Reservoir in December. The evening will include the opportunity to network with friends and colleagues, drinks on arrival, cheese platters and canapes, the debate, and an exclusive Christmas performance from the Underground Opera in the Reservoir! This is an event not to be missed.

In the days before adequate protection for heritage places was introduced, The National Trust of Australia (Queensland) was once known as the community group who stopped development – their arsenal was picket lines, protests and rallies. Fast forward two decades and Queensland now has statutory heritage registers, a statewide Heritage Council and requirements to ensure that the demolition of heritage such as ‘Cloudlands’ could never happen again. But does the heritage industry have its head in the Cloudlands? Are we at risk of being left off the negotiation table if we rigidly stick to stringent guidelines? In our quest for heritage protection, have we lost sight of the bigger picture and is this detrimental to our cause?

The Trust Talks: The Debate brings together 4 renowned experts and advocates to debate this timely topic, including: Dr Meredith Walker, Dr Andrew Sneddon, Christina Cho and Jane Alexander.

Thursday 7th December, 5pm for a 6pm start. For further information and ticketing, go to: www.nationaltrust.org.au/event/the-trust-talks-the-debate/