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National Trust of Australia (QLD)

"Head in the Cloudlands – is there too much idealism in heritage?” The Trust Talks, our speaker series aiming at opening the doors for innovation, collaboration and celebration of our heritage, is going underground into the Springhill Reservoir in December. The evening will include the opportunity to network with friends and colleagues, drinks on arrival, cheese platters and canapes, the debate, and an exclusive Christmas performance from the Underground Opera in the Reservoir! This is an event not to be missed.

In the days before adequate protection for heritage places was introduced, The National Trust of Australia (Queensland) was once known as the community group who stopped development – their arsenal was picket lines, protests and rallies. Fast forward two decades and Queensland now has statutory heritage registers, a statewide Heritage Council and requirements to ensure that the demolition of heritage such as ‘Cloudlands’ could never happen again. But does the heritage industry have its head in the Cloudlands? Are we at risk of being left off the negotiation table if we rigidly stick to stringent guidelines? In our quest for heritage protection, have we lost sight of the bigger picture and is this detrimental to our cause?

The Trust Talks: The Debate brings together 4 renowned experts and advocates to debate this timely topic, including: Dr Meredith Walker, Dr Andrew Sneddon, Christina Cho and Jane Alexander.

Thursday 7th December, 5pm for a 6pm start. For further information and ticketing, go to: www.nationaltrust.org.au/event/the-trust-talks-the-debate/



Bronwyn Woff

A resident of Maffra, VIC has recently been interviewed by the ABC network as an interest story on his collection of C20th century electronics. The early kettles (numbering between 1,500 and 2000), radios and other appliances and collectables are on display throughout his home, which he regularly opens for tours by interested groups.

For more information, see: www.abc.net.au/news



Caiti D'Gluyas

One of the most significant finds from the 2002 Casselden Place, Melbourne, archaeological investigations (50 Lonsdale Street) was a medal struck to commemorate the Cessation of Convict Transportation (see images below, source: GML Heritage). The medal commemorates not only the victory of the anti-transportation movement but also the 50th anniversary of the founding of Tasmania on 10th August 1853.

The medal's design was approved by the Anti-Transportation League committee in 1853 before being fabricated in England. The medals finally arrived in Australia for distribution in 1855. The medal features James Wyon's portrait of Queen Victoria on one side, with the reverse showing the armorial bearings for Tasmania in a shield. James Wyon was a resident engraver at the Royal Mint and is best known for engraving the dies for sovereigns and half-sovereigns at the new Sydney branch of the Royal Mint. The shield is quartered by the Southern Cross and bears pastoral, commercial and agricultural emblems supported by the emu and kangaroo, surmounted by a rising sun motif.

The medal was cast in three different metals. One single medal was struck in gold for presentation to Queen Victoria, 100 were struck in bronze for committee members and 9000 were struck in white metal for general distribution. The medal recovered from Casselden Place appears to be a bronze issue. Many of the white metal medals went to Tasmanian school children. At the cessation celebrations, each child was given a piece of cake and a ticket enabling them to receive a medal, once they had arrived in the colony. On 3 August 1855, 9000 medals arrived in Launceston and 4000 were immediately dispatched to Hobart. Another 3000 were held in Launceston and 2000 were distributed to Green Ponds, Norfolk Plains, Ross, Evandale, Longford and other country districts.

The medal is now in the collection of Museum Victoria as part of a set of archaeological assemblages from the ‘Little Lon’ precinct. The most recent and concluding historical archaeological excavation at ‘Little Lon’ was undertaken between April and July 2017 for the 271 Spring Street development. An interpretation scheme for this excavation is currently being prepared by GML Heritage and will draw together the multiple phases of archaeological investigation that has occurred within the precinct. The medal provides an opportunity to interpret a fascinating story about ‘the hated stain’ of transportation.

References:
McNeice, R 1990, Tasmanian commemorative medals and medallions 1853–1900: A collector's handbook, Taroona.
Mint Issue September 2003, Royal Australia Mint.



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

The Heritage Listed QANTAS hangar at Longreach has turned 95. The hangar was where QANTAS first began it's operations, and is now the location of the QANTAS Founders Museum. The Museum hosted a morning tea to celebrate the hangars birthday, which was added to the Register in 2009. For more information, please see:

https://qfom.com.au/2017/08/07/media-release-national-heritage-listed-qantas-hangar-turns-95/

Image: Photo take on 2 November 1922 on the arrival of the first scheduled Qantas flight from Charleville to Longreach, sourced from above article



University of Sydney

The University of Sydney presents a lecture by Nathalie Cohen, Head of Community Archaeology at the Museum of London Archaeology: Knole Unlocked- The secret history of a country mansion. This lecture will take place on 17 August 2017, and the evening will include champagne and pies.

Knole is one of England's largest country houses and is owned by the National Trust. Over the last five years, a major program of conservation has been underway, supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund. This has involved repairs to the roofs and exterior, and extensive work within the showrooms, removing panelling and lifting floorboards to allow for repairs and new services. Archaeological investigation and recording of these previously unseen areas has greatly enhanced our understanding of this great house and this presentation will describe discoveries made during the course of this project.

Nathalie Cohen has worked on a number of different archaeological projects over the past 20 years, including: the Monuments at Risk Survey in the East Midlands, the Grimes London Archive Project and the Thames Archaeological Survey, and overseas at sites in Israel, the Czech Republic and Romania. She has also worked at the Museum of London Archaeology Service (now MOLA); as the Archivist for the unit, as a field archaeologist on excavations, and as a foreshore and built heritage specialist, on sites across Greater London, Kent, Buckinghamshire, Somerset, Devon and Surrey. She is currently an Honorary Research Associate at UCL, and also the Cathedral Archaeologist for Canterbury Cathedral.

Event details
6.00pm - 7.30pm Nicholson Museum The Quadrangle
Cost: $40, $30 for Friends of the Nicholson Museum and their Guests. $10 for Students.
RSVP: Please follow the link to register and pay online. http://bit.ly/nicholsonevents

Bronwyn Woff and Cathy Tucker

Please join us for a tour of Museum Victoria's dedicated storage facility on Friday 17th March 2017 followed by lunch at the Post Office Hotel in Coburg.



Attendees of the last tour enjoyed exploring the various objects of State significance at the storage facility late in 2016. Spots are limited so make sure you sign up soon!

See the following blog post for more on what the attendees of the last tour experienced:

http://www.asha.org.au/news/museum_store_tour


 

Tour group exploring the History and Technology Store
Tour group exploring the History and Technology Store
Catherine Tucker,  Andrea Murphy and Bronwyn Woff

On Thursday 8 December 2016 members of ASHA and other non-member historic archaeologists and historians attended a guided tour of Museums Victoria’s storage facility in Melbourne’s northern suburbs, organised by ASHA committee members Bronwyn Woff and Catherine Tucker.

The storage facility provides tailored storage areas for objects when they are not on display at Museums Victoria’s three campuses at Melbourne Museum (Carlton), the Immigration Museum (CBD) and Scienceworks (Spotswood).

Mr Veegan McMasters (Senior Coordinator, Collections Storage and Logistics, Strategic Collection Management Department) showed us some of the 17 million objects housed by Museums Victoria – an extraordinary array of objects including everything from taxidermy animals, machinery, clothing and textiles, aeroplanes, to barbed wire and fencing equipment, handbags, signage, tools and household equipment through the ages. Veegan also explained the location system used by organisation, by which every object is barcoded and the location recorded on a live location system.

Artefacts excavated from the Commonwealth Block - land bounded by Lonsdale, Little Lonsdale, Spring and Exhibition Streets, and owned by the Commonwealth Government since 1948 - in Melbourne's CBD is also housed at this facility. The collection consists of artefacts from various excavations from 1988 to the present, and holds the largest nineteenth century urban historical archaeology collection in the world.

Research Assistant Bronwyn Woff explaining the Historical Archaeology Collection
Research Assistant Bronwyn Woff explaining the Historical Archaeology Collection

The resource is incredible and is certainly something that archaeologists from around Australia could consult. If anyone is interested in accessing the collection, images of some of the artefacts are found on Museums Victoria's “Collections Online” website. The search is easy to use, and you can filter by Collecting Area eg: Historical Archaeology, or search all of the Museums collections. For in-person viewing of the collection, access may be able to be organised through the Discovery centre. Links for these two sites can be found below: