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ASHA NEWS

Written by ASHA Committee

In August 2017 ASHA conducted a survey of members regarding what type of workshop members would be interested in attending. In response to outcomes of the survey, ASHA is proposing to hold a series workshops aimed at enhancing your heritage skills in key areas identified by members.

The first workshop - Technical and Research Skills - is aimed at refining practitioners’ assessment skills when using documents, maps and plans, providing greater understanding the different statutory environments, and an opportunity to consider archaeological research designs and archaeological significance. The workshop will be held on Friday 20th April, 2018 at the Big Dig Centre in Sydney.

While the workshop is aimed at archaeologists, it will also be beneficial to heritage consultants who include the outcomes of archaeological assessments in their reports, people who manage general archaeological and heritage issues. Further details, including registration details, are available here: http://www.asha.org.au/events

Compiled by Blog Editor

A reminder that National Archaeology Week (20-26 May 2018) is fast approaching!

If you have an event you wish to advertise, or if you want to check out what's on, go to: http://www.archaeologyweek.com/ where you'll find a state-by-state events list. You can also find National Archaeology Week on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeologyweek/

The state representatives are:
NSW – Helen Nicholson - nhelen@tpg.com.au
Qld – Paddy Waterson - paddy.waterson@gmail.com
SA – Antoinette Hennessy - antoinette.hennessy@flinders.edu.au
Tas – Samuel Dix – samuel.dix@griffithuni.edu.au
Vic – Caroline Spry – c.spry@latrobe.edu.au
WA – Wendy Reynen – wa@australianarchaeology.com

And if you are posting on social media, please remember to use the hashtag #2018NAW

Written by Richard Morrison

A joint half-day event with the Canberra Archaeological Society and ASHA will be held at the National Museum of Australia, Canberra, on Saturday 14 April 2018 in ACT Region Heritage Week. Speakers will include Professor Sue O’Connor (ANU), Dr Mike Pearson AO, Professor June Ross (UNE), Dr Tristen Jones (ANU) and Dr Duncan Wright (ANU). There will be a Q&A panel of the speakers at the end of the talks. For more information please see: https://maritimecasasha.eventbrite.com.au

Compiled by Blog Editor

A reminder to members that submissions for the ASHA journal Australasian Historical Archaeology are due on 31 March. For more information see: http://www.asha.org.au/submission-information.html

The Sydney Historical Archaeology Practitioners (SHAP) Workshop has also put out a call for sessions/papers for the event on 18th May 2018. For more information see: www.archaeologyweek.com/

Written by NZ Archaeology Week Committee

Kia ora. A reminder that New Zealand Archaeology Week 2018 will run from April 28-May 6.

New Zealand Archaeology Week is a week-long nationwide celebration of archaeological heritage co-ordinated by the New Zealand Archaeological Association (NZAA). The aim is to increase public awareness of archaeology and highlight the importance of protecting our archaeological heritage.

Our inaugural event in April 2017 was very successful, with over 40 events being run across the country, made possible by contributions from a number of museums and heritage organisations, councils, tangata whenua, universities and consultant archaeologists. For an up-to-date listing of events being run in 2018, keep an eye on our website:  https://nzarchaeology.org/news-events/national-archaeology-week

It's not too late to get involved either! If you have an idea for an event you would be willing and able to help run, we encourage you to get in touch with our hardworking national co-ordinator Kathryn via archaeologyweek@nzarchaeology.org


Written by Caiti D'Gluyas

The next ASHA reading group is being hosted by Casey and Lowe and will be held on 22nd March. This is a semi-regular (quarterly) opportunity to catch-up with other historical archaeologists and discuss themes of interest.

Topic: Historical Artefacts
Facilitator: Robyn Stocks, Senior Artefact Specialist, Casey and Lowe
Location: Casey and Lowe Offices, 51 Reuss Street, LEICHHARDT NSW 2040
Time: 6pm, Thursday 22nd March 2017

Primary Readings
Davies, P. 2005 ‘Writing Slates and Schooling in Victoria’, Australasian Historical Archaeology 23:63-69.
Gojak, D. & I. Stuart 1999 ‘The Potential for the Archaeological Study of Clay, Tobacco Pipes from Australian Sites’, Australasian Historical Archaeology 17:38-49.
Klippel, W.E. & G.F. Schroedl 1999 ‘African slave craftsmen and single-hole bone discs from Brimstone Hill, St Kitts, West Indies’, Post-Medieval Archaeology 33:22–232.

Secondary Readings
Varman, R.V.J. 1993 Bricks and Nails: Building Materials as Criteria for Dating in Sydney and Environs from 1788, A Documentary Survey and Assessment of Dating Potential, Unpublished PhD Thesis, University of Sydney. Available online at https://ses.library.usyd.edu.au/handle/2123/1205

Contact secretary@asha.org.au if you are finding it difficult to find the readings.

The event is free and open to anyone who is interested, however, RSVPs are essential (to secretary@asha.org.au), so please get in touch if you would like to come!


Written by the SHAP 2018 committee

The Sydney Historical Archaeology Practitioners’ (SHAP) Workshop, proudly organised by Extent Heritage, will be taking place once again this year during National Archaeology Week 2018. In this one-day workshop - to be held on Friday, 18 May 2018 at the Sydney Harbor YHA Big Dig Archaeology Education Centre - historical archaeologists, students and anyone interested in the discipline will come together to share ideas, recent projects, technology and developments for historical archaeology in NSW.

The theme of this year’s Workshop is: The Role of Archaeology in Heritage Conservation

Effective heritage conservation is crucial for the preservation, understanding and interpretation of the past. A number of recent developments across Australian major urban hubs and their surrounds resulted in the discovery of important and rare archaeological sites and artefacts that are able to provide a wealth of information. However, not all sites can be retained and not all of the artefacts can be displayed. This year’s SHAP is the opportunity for the industry practitioners to present the most recent archaeological discoveries and the ways they have been conserved. This gathering can also be an initiation for greater participation and presentation of Australian historical archaeology at the next ICOMOS GA and Scientific Symposium that will be hosted by Sydney in 2020.

This is a call for papers, presentations and demonstrations: if you have an exciting or relevant idea for a 15 to 20-minute presentation, please submit a 150 to 400 word abstract to Extent Heritage, as the submission information provided below. Creative session proposals are very welcome! There will also be a “Your Plug Spot” session, where you will be able to announce upcoming events, news, notices etc.

Tickets will be available in early April, so watch this space! Presenters, please remember that you must attend the conference if your paper or session is accepted. We look forward to hearing from you!

Important information for submissions:
Due date: Midnight on Monday, 2 April 2018
Submissions to: admin@extent.com.au
Please ensure submissions are relevant to the theme – we may ask you to make edits to your abstract to make it more relevant to Archaeology in Heritage Conservation

In your submission please include:
1. A subject line in your email: SHAP 2018
2. Presentation title
3. Abstract of 150 – 400 words
4. Presenter and co-authors’ names
5. Company affiliation
6. The form of your proposed session (e.g. paper presentation, workshop, demonstration, interactive session)

All abstracts are submitted for review only – not every abstract will be successfully placed into a session
Successful presenters must attend the workshop

Written by AHA Editors

A reminder that submissions to Australasian Historical Archaeology are due on 31 March.  We welcome original articles and short reports about historical archaeology in Australasia and the wider region. Please see the website for more information.

If you would like to contribute but need more time please contact us before the deadline to discuss options (email: editor@asha.org.au).

Regards,
Annie Clark, Penny Crook, James Flexner & Sarah Hayes
Editors
Australasian Historical Archaeology



Dr Jennifer Rodrigues

Call for papers: People and the sea: current research on maritime interactions between Southeast Asia and the wider world

Session Chairs:
Dr Jennifer Rodrigues, Western Australian Museum (Jennifer.Rodrigues@museum.wa.gov.au)
Ms Abhirada Pook Komoot, University of Western Australia (abhirada.komoot@research.uwa.edu.au)

The interconnections of two major Oceans—the Indian and Pacific Oceans—have dominated Southeast Asian maritime heritage for thousands of years, enabling movement of, and interaction between, people, ideas and goods. Confirmation of the relationship between Southeast Asia with other regions is evidenced in the dispersal of Austronesian languages, spoken widely in Southeast Asia. Due to the sea providing travel routes to distant regions of the Pacific and Indian Oceans, the expansion of the languages suggests that people from Southeast Asia migrated to both sides—eastward to Oceania and Africa to the west. Furthermore, influences of maritime activities have spread beyond ports and maritime settlements. Research has revealed that mainland Southeast Asia including Myanmar, Thailand, Lao PDR, Cambodia and Vietnam also benefited from nautical skills through their complex riverine networks. Material traces from the hinterland and along coastal rims of both oceans, show that Southeast Asia has long been a dynamic region with an intense mix of cultures in its geographical crossroads. In ancient times, Southeast Asia was the only maritime gateway to China from the west. Research on maritime history in Southeast Asia, therefore, is crucial in defining the foundations of modern economic patterns.

This session welcomes researchers and young scholars from a wide range of fields and disciplines to share their work on Southeast Asia’s maritime past. It aims to gain, and discuss, new insight into the maritime history of the region’s connections with the wider world. Papers may include, but are not limited to, studies in material culture, traditional practices, and awareness-raising programmes through preservation and interpretation of the archaeological resources. Raising public awareness of the importance and potential of our maritime heritage can enrich our understanding of the past, and help forge cooperation and common ground for preserving and appreciating our shared heritage.

IPPA: Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association

Please send presentation abstract proposals (approx. 250 words) to both Session Chairs by end January 2018.



National Trust (Australia)

Registrations are now open for the 2018 Australian Heritage Festival !

The Australian Heritage Festival is Australia’s biggest annual community-driven heritage festival. In April and May 2017, thousands of event organisers and volunteers across Australia managed almost 1,200 events to celebrate our fantastic heritage, history and culture. In 2018 we hope the festival will be even more inclusive and community inspired. We've provided lots of useful information, tips and help to ensure your event is a success.

This year we are focusing on what makes a place special, encouraging us all to embrace the future by sharing the strengths of our cultural identities. The 2018 Australian Heritage Festival theme is My Culture, My Story celebrating the diversity of cultures that have shaped our shared heritage. The Festival is an opportunity to reflect on the places where we live, work, and travel, and why they are special, celebrating our many diverse and distinctive cultures. So we call on communities to treasure their local cultural heritage by telling their stories and celebrating their traditions, including storytelling, music, food, dance, traditional games, and crafts.

What are the cultures of your region, and how are they celebrated? What are the stories of your community? Do you know an untold story that should be shared? What is the role of new generations in celebrating and protecting our heritage?

Please join us and get involved for what will be an amazing celebration.

The Australian Heritage Festival is supported through funding from the Australian Government’s National Trusts Partnership Program.

Note: Some States may have additional event organiser information and requirements.