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ASHA NEWS



Bronwyn Woff

The ASHA Committee would like to thank everyone that attended the 2017 Travelling Stories conference! We hope that you had a fantastic time travelling through Tassie and experiencing all sorts of stories, and learning new ways of interpreting them.

A HUGE thank you goes out to the conference committee, from both ASHA and Interpretation Australia, who have put in an emmense amount of effort into this conference, to such great success!!

We would also like to congratulate Ian Smith on his Best Paper award for: Hikoi to hohi: archaeology, biculturalism and interpretation at Rangihoua Heritage Park, New Zealand

We look forward to our next conference in 2018 which will be in partnership with the Australian Institute for Maritime Archaeology!



UCL Press

UCL Press is delighted to announce a brand new open access textbook that may be of interest to list subscribers: Key Concepts in Public Archaeology. The book can be downloaded for free as a PDF and app, read online for free, and purchased in paperback and hardback.

Free PDF download/app/enhanced online edition HERE

This book provides a broad overview of the key concepts in public archaeology, a research field that examines the relationship between archaeology and the public, in both theoretical and practical terms. While based on the long-standing programme of undergraduate and graduate teaching in public archaeology at UCL’s Institute of Archaeology, the book also takes into account the growth of scholarship from around the world and seeks to clarify what exactly ‘public archaeology’ is by promoting an inclusive, socially and politically engaged vision of the discipline.

Written for students and practitioners, the individual chapters provide textbook-level introductions to the themes, theories and controversies that connect archaeology to wider society, from the trade in illicit antiquities to the use of digital media in public engagement, and point readers to the most relevant case studies and learning resources to aid their further study.



Bronwyn Woff

Developers are planning to build a multi-story office block on the heritage-listed former Dennys Lascelles Wool Store in Geelong, Victoria. The Wool Store was built in 1872, for a company that became one of the most significant wool-broking businesses in Australia, and is listed for its state significance. For more information, see:

https://architectureau.com/articles/heritage-listed-geelong-wool-store-to-become-high-rise-office-block/
http://www.smh.com.au/business/property/techne-pitches-tower-for-geelong-wool-stores-20170905-gyb6ds.html



Bronwyn Woff

The Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology and Interpretation Australia wish to welcome the 2017 Conference delegates to the "Travelling Stories: Connecting People and Landscapes" Conference! Below are all the links you need: who, what, when, where and how of the first joint conference between ASHA and IA. We look forward to catching up with friends and making new connections with collegues. We hope you enjoy the presentations and field trips we've organised, and remind delegates that the ASHA and IA AGM's will be held on Wednesday 11th October, 5.30pm at The Tramsheds, Launceston.


For more info: 2017 ASHA-IA Conference
Venue Maps:VenueMaps.pdf
Quick Conference Schedule:Travelling Stories Conference Schedule.pdf



ASHA committee/University of Sydney

Dr Barra Ó Donnabháin will soon present a free public lecture: Our experiment at Spike Island: archaeology of a Victorian convict depot in Ireland . Dr Donnabháin's visit has been sponsored by the Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology, ahead of the 2017 conference.

The lecture will focus of the Spike Island Archaeological Project is the Victorian convict depot that, opened in 1847 at the height of the Great Irish Famine and closed in 1883. In the 1850s, the prison was the largest in the then United Kingdom. The convict depot was an important holding centre for convicts transported to Bermuda, Gibraltar and Van Diemen's Land, and it operated during a critical period for the development of the modern prison system.

A combination of archival and archaeological research provides a means of investigating daily life in the prison and the triangle of relationships between convicts, warders and the institution. At a broader level, Spike Island is an important site for the exploration of complex questions of inequality and race, as well as the ambivalences and contradictions of empire.

The lecture will take place on 17th October, 5.30pm - 6.30pm at the Nicholson Museum, University of Sydney.

For more information, and to register please see: http://whatson.sydney.edu.au/events/published/our-experiment-at-spike-island



Sarah Hayes

ASHA’s Twitter account needs you! We are looking for a small group of committed Twitter users to run the ASHA Twitter account. Ideally we would like to have people from different cities and regions to promote local events and ASHA happenings to the ASHA community. Plus of course find and share interesting news stories!

If you are a regular Twitter user and would like to help out please find me on Twitter @SarahHResearch or send me an email at s.hayes@latrobe.edu.au  And if you aren’t following already, find us on Twitter @ASHA_inc



Prof Richard Mackay

The Heritage Council of Victoria is considering the feasibility of preparing a new ‘Victorian Heritage Strategy’. The previous strategy – Victoria’s Heritage: Strengthening Our Communities – operated between 2006 and 2010, but in the period since there have been significant changes, which provide the context for considering a new Heritage Strategy.

Mackay Strategic (Richard Mackay) has been commissioned to prepare a ‘feasibility study’ which looks at the opportunities, scope and implications for a new Victorian Heritage Strategy. As part of this process, stakeholders in Victoria’s Heritage are being invited to use this short survey to express opinions about a new heritage strategy – the merits, issues, opportunities and priorities at the outset of the feasibility assessment.

The survey can be accessed here and will take approximately 15 minutes to complete. (Please note that it is best to avoid Internet Explorer or to ensure that internet settings are Google compatible). Your contribution by 30 September would be greatly appreciated.



Caitlin D'Gluyas

Following our first reading group event (with the theme of interpreting historical archaeology) in August, ASHA will host a casual/informal walking tour of Parramatta on Saturday, the 23rd September. This will be a chance to have a look around at some interpretive displays of historical archaeology. Perhaps some food for thought for the upcoming conference (don't forget to register for the conference by COB on Wednesday 20th September).

The walk will start at 2:30pm, meeting at the convict hut site on the corner of Marsden and Macquarie Streets. We'll be meeting on the steps out the front of the site. Final list of sites to visit to be confirmed, but please let us know if there is somewhere that you'd like to see. The tentative list includes: Bakers Mews-50 O’Connell Street, 25 Smith Street, 1 Parramatta Square.

On the same day, GML is also having an open day (another form of interpretation to talk about!) of the Parramatta RSL site, which can be booked through the RSL website. The last tour will be at 1:00pm, so you could book and attend that before the walking tour if you're interested. Book through the RSL reception: (02) 8865 5100. For more details: http://www.gml.com.au/lawn-bowl-thing-past/



ASHA/IA Conference Committee

The "Travelling Stories" joint ASHA and Interpretation Australia conference is just around the corner. Is there a seat with your name on it on the bus and you just haven't gotten around to registering yet? Don't forget that registrations close 5pm on the 20th September and seats are filling up fast.

For more information and to register follow this link: http://portarthur.org.au/activities/travelling-stories-registration/



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

Legislation in NSW that curbs the use of rail corridors for activites other than train use are changing, with a cycle and walking path to be installed between Rosewood and Turrumburra on an unused section of rail track. A single track line between Picton and Mittagong will be reinstated for use by heritage trains from the NSW Rail Museum, as well as a walking and cycling track alongside the same stretch the track.

For more information, see: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-08-22/picton-to-mittagong-return-of-the-age-of-steam/8781430