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ASHA NEWS



National Trust, Queensland

Expressions of Interest are being sought by the National Trust (Queensland) for the Heritage Advocacy Committee. The committee exists to assist the National Trust board achieve its advocacy objectives for Queensland heritage - natural, built and cultural.

The Advocacy Committee, is calling for up 6 new Committee members. The following information details the background, the committee structure and the EOI process can be found at the following link: www.nationaltrust.org.au



Bronwyn Woff

The ASHA Committee would like to thank everyone that attended the 2017 Travelling Stories conference! We hope that you had a fantastic time travelling through Tassie and experiencing all sorts of stories, and learning new ways of interpreting them.

A HUGE thank you goes out to the conference committee, from both ASHA and Interpretation Australia, who have put in an emmense amount of effort into this conference, to such great success!!

We would also like to congratulate Ian Smith on his Best Paper award for: Hikoi to hohi: archaeology, biculturalism and interpretation at Rangihoua Heritage Park, New Zealand

We look forward to our next conference in 2018 which will be in partnership with the Australian Institute for Maritime Archaeology!



UCL Press

UCL Press is delighted to announce a brand new open access textbook that may be of interest to list subscribers: Key Concepts in Public Archaeology. The book can be downloaded for free as a PDF and app, read online for free, and purchased in paperback and hardback.

Free PDF download/app/enhanced online edition HERE

This book provides a broad overview of the key concepts in public archaeology, a research field that examines the relationship between archaeology and the public, in both theoretical and practical terms. While based on the long-standing programme of undergraduate and graduate teaching in public archaeology at UCL’s Institute of Archaeology, the book also takes into account the growth of scholarship from around the world and seeks to clarify what exactly ‘public archaeology’ is by promoting an inclusive, socially and politically engaged vision of the discipline.

Written for students and practitioners, the individual chapters provide textbook-level introductions to the themes, theories and controversies that connect archaeology to wider society, from the trade in illicit antiquities to the use of digital media in public engagement, and point readers to the most relevant case studies and learning resources to aid their further study.



Bronwyn Woff

The Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology and Interpretation Australia wish to welcome the 2017 Conference delegates to the "Travelling Stories: Connecting People and Landscapes" Conference! Below are all the links you need: who, what, when, where and how of the first joint conference between ASHA and IA. We look forward to catching up with friends and making new connections with collegues. We hope you enjoy the presentations and field trips we've organised, and remind delegates that the ASHA and IA AGM's will be held on Wednesday 11th October, 5.30pm at The Tramsheds, Launceston.


For more info: 2017 ASHA-IA Conference
Venue Maps:VenueMaps.pdf
Quick Conference Schedule:Travelling Stories Conference Schedule.pdf



Sarah Hayes

ASHA’s Twitter account needs you! We are looking for a small group of committed Twitter users to run the ASHA Twitter account. Ideally we would like to have people from different cities and regions to promote local events and ASHA happenings to the ASHA community. Plus of course find and share interesting news stories!

If you are a regular Twitter user and would like to help out please find me on Twitter @SarahHResearch or send me an email at s.hayes@latrobe.edu.au  And if you aren’t following already, find us on Twitter @ASHA_inc



Caiti D'Gluyas

One of the most significant finds from the 2002 Casselden Place, Melbourne, archaeological investigations (50 Lonsdale Street) was a medal struck to commemorate the Cessation of Convict Transportation (see images below, source: GML Heritage). The medal commemorates not only the victory of the anti-transportation movement but also the 50th anniversary of the founding of Tasmania on 10th August 1853.

The medal's design was approved by the Anti-Transportation League committee in 1853 before being fabricated in England. The medals finally arrived in Australia for distribution in 1855. The medal features James Wyon's portrait of Queen Victoria on one side, with the reverse showing the armorial bearings for Tasmania in a shield. James Wyon was a resident engraver at the Royal Mint and is best known for engraving the dies for sovereigns and half-sovereigns at the new Sydney branch of the Royal Mint. The shield is quartered by the Southern Cross and bears pastoral, commercial and agricultural emblems supported by the emu and kangaroo, surmounted by a rising sun motif.

The medal was cast in three different metals. One single medal was struck in gold for presentation to Queen Victoria, 100 were struck in bronze for committee members and 9000 were struck in white metal for general distribution. The medal recovered from Casselden Place appears to be a bronze issue. Many of the white metal medals went to Tasmanian school children. At the cessation celebrations, each child was given a piece of cake and a ticket enabling them to receive a medal, once they had arrived in the colony. On 3 August 1855, 9000 medals arrived in Launceston and 4000 were immediately dispatched to Hobart. Another 3000 were held in Launceston and 2000 were distributed to Green Ponds, Norfolk Plains, Ross, Evandale, Longford and other country districts.

The medal is now in the collection of Museum Victoria as part of a set of archaeological assemblages from the ‘Little Lon’ precinct. The most recent and concluding historical archaeological excavation at ‘Little Lon’ was undertaken between April and July 2017 for the 271 Spring Street development. An interpretation scheme for this excavation is currently being prepared by GML Heritage and will draw together the multiple phases of archaeological investigation that has occurred within the precinct. The medal provides an opportunity to interpret a fascinating story about ‘the hated stain’ of transportation.

References:
McNeice, R 1990, Tasmanian commemorative medals and medallions 1853–1900: A collector's handbook, Taroona.
Mint Issue September 2003, Royal Australia Mint.



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

The Heritage Listed QANTAS hangar at Longreach has turned 95. The hangar was where QANTAS first began it's operations, and is now the location of the QANTAS Founders Museum. The Museum hosted a morning tea to celebrate the hangars birthday, which was added to the Register in 2009. For more information, please see:

https://qfom.com.au/2017/08/07/media-release-national-heritage-listed-qantas-hangar-turns-95/

Image: Photo take on 2 November 1922 on the arrival of the first scheduled Qantas flight from Charleville to Longreach, sourced from above article



ASHA/IA Conference Committee

The "Travelling Stories" joint ASHA and Interpretation Australia conference is just around the corner. Is there a seat with your name on it on the bus and you just haven't gotten around to registering yet? Don't forget that registrations close 5pm on the 20th September and seats are filling up fast.

For more information and to register follow this link: http://portarthur.org.au/activities/travelling-stories-registration/



Compiled by Richard Morrison

The 2016 Australia State of the Environment (SOE) Report (Overview) was tabled in Parliament in March 2017 to provide a basis for government policy makers to undertake more informed decisions about the environment. The SOE is a five-yearly series of authoritative, national environmental overviews (begun in 1996) and continues the ‘report card’ approach of assessments of pressures, condition and trends; discussions of risk and resilience; and future projections or ‘outlooks’ that were first implemented in SOE 2011.

The Meeting of Environment Ministers (Commonwealth, State and Territory) agreed in Melbourne on the 28 July 2017 to ‘work together to identify opportunities for cross-government collaboration to address concerns raised in the report’. It is hoped that this agreement, where the relevant minister does not have heritage responsibilities, will also bind the respective jurisdictional heritage minister.

The author of the substantial heritage theme contribution to the 2016 SOE was Professor Richard Mackay AM.

The link to this SOE theme can be found at: https://soe.environment.gov.au/theme/heritage and the entire report can be found at http://www.environment.gov.au/science/soe. Links to the various SOE reports, compiled in their own independent processes, by individual state and territories, can also be found here.



Travelling Stories Conference Committee

The ASHA and IA Travelling Stories Conference Committee have released an update on the conference locations. The pre-conference evening reception will be held at The Queen Victoria Museum, Launceston. 
The first day of conference papers will be held at The Tramsheds, Launceston 

The second day of conference papers will be held in Hobart after a day of site visits, and will be split over two locations. The plenary session will be held at The Baha’i Centre, Hobart. The paper session will be held at the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery , Hobart. The conference dinner will then be held at Brook Street Larder

We are looking forward to seeing attendees at the conference!