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ASHA NEWS

EIANZ Committee

EIANZ's 2017 Annual Conference will be held on Monday 30 and Tuesday 31 October 2017 in Wellington, New Zealand with a welcome function on 29 October and field trips scheduled for 1 November. The theme for the 2017 conference is Tu Kaha: Stand Tall, Fronting up with wicked solutions.

Our environmental work is increasingly confronted by wicked problems: those that seem difficult or impossible to solve because of incomplete data; complex and contradictory factors; and the risk of unforeseen consequences.

This conference will focus on wicked solutions/: those solutions that are innovative, collaborative, and multi-disciplinary; that take approaches that can be shared across disciplines; and use tools and techniques that apply in many different environments.

It is time to stand tall, stand together and front up with wicked solutions to ensure that we, as environmental professionals, are leading by example and doing our part to achieve excellence in environmental practice.

Call for papers

The call for papers is open. Submit an abstract by Friday 26 May 2017 at the following link: https://www.eianz.org/conference-information/call-for-papers

Fenella Atkinson

AACAI is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2017 Student Support Fund:

  • Lauren Churchill (University of Sydney) Foodways in regional New South Wales in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries: A study of butchery patterns
  • Rodina Goranitis (University of Queensland) Doing it right: Best practice standards in cultural heritage management
  • Rebekah Hawkins (University of Sydney) Exploring the relationship between raw material and morphology in a lithic assemblage from Lake George NSW: A close look at backed artefacts and core production and their connection to raw material
  • Jacinta Koolmatrie (Flinders University) Adnyamathanha Yura Malka
  • Liam Norris (Australian National University) The Aboriginal history of Ulladulla

On completion, summaries of the projects will be published in the AACAI E-News, and papers in the AACAI Journal.

We would like to acknowledge the generous support of the sponsors of the 2017 Fund:

  • Archae-aus
  • Comber Consultants
  • Everick Heritage Consultants
  • Extent Heritage
  • North Qld Cultural Heritage
  • Ochre Imprints
  • Wallis Heritage Consulting

Thank you very much to all the applicants, and best wishes with your studies.

GML Heritage

At the recent NSW National Trust Heritage awards, GML Heritage won the award for Interpretation for their Hill End Historic Site project.

Hill End Historic Site is a former gold mining town in the central west of New South Wales. The National Parks and Wildlife Service commissioned GML, with Trigger and Simon MacArthur Associates to prepare an interpretation plan to increase visitor ‘access’ to the stories, sensory qualities and character of the site.

The interpretation plan focused on revitalisation and reimagining the presentation of Hill End. It not only defined themes and heritage values, but also addressed the wider business revitalisation of the site in a holistic way, identifying revenue generation, combined with visitor and marketing opportunities to assist conservation of the place and its collections.

Innovative tourism opportunities were identified with the aim of strengthening and diversifying the visitor experience, increasing sustainability and supporting local businesses and new social entrepreneurs. The project team generated a range of engaging options and interpretive programs to address the different needs and interests of visitors. A key aim was to create an authentic visitor experience that fostered creative enterprise to engage with artisans, crafts people and other businesses that aligned with the character and identity of Hill End.

Clarifying the site’s carrying capacity and identifying ways to improve on-site visitor management, GML also market-tested interpretive initiatives and prepared costings to ensure value for money, reduce risk and maximise successful implementation.

For more information, please see the following links:
https://www.nationaltrust.org.au/education-and-interpretation-alchemy-hill-end/
http://www.gml.com.au/gml-wins-at-2017-nsw-national-trust-heritage-awards/

National Archaeology Week Committee

National Archaeology Week aims to increase public awareness of Australian archaeology and the work of Australian archaeologists at home and abroad. It also promotes the importance of protecting Australia's unique archaeological heritage.

A nationwide program of events and exhibitions is held in May each year, including public talks, walking tours and displays.

Please see the following pages for more information:
http://www.archaeologyweek.com/
https://www.facebook.com/archaeologyweek/

Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

Judy Birmingham, prominent archaeologist, has been awarded a Lifetime Achievement Heritage Award from the NSW National Trust for her various contributions to the discipline, including her teaching role at University of Sydney and co-writing the conservation guidelines for the NSW Department of Planning.


For more about Judy Birmingham, her various acheivments, and other Heritage Awardees see the following links:

https://www.nationaltrust.org.au/heritage-awards-nsw/
https://www.nationaltrust.org.au/heritage-awards-2017-winners/
http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/

ASHA and Interpretation Australia

Travelling Stories: connecting people and landscapes is the first joint conference of Interpretation Australia and the Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology. It aims to bring together people to create a greater understanding for all of the environments in which we live. This will be a conference with a difference, a traveling conference from Launceston to Hobart via key natural and cultural heritage places through Tasmania! The conference will be held between October 10 - 14 2017. A draft program is outlined below:


Tuesday 10 October: Arrive in Launceston – Welcome evening event
Wednesday 11 October: Launceston sessions
Thursday 12 October: Travel day Launceston to Hobart via Midlands
Friday 13 October: Hobart sessions + conference dinner (end of conference)
Saturday 14 October: Optional Hobart site visits or trip to Port Arthur Region

For more information, please see the following links:
ASHA conference page
Interpretation Australia conference page


Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

Members may be interested to explore context posted to a new archaeology and anthropology blog hosted on The Guardian's website, entitled The Past and The Curious. The blog can be found at the following link:

www.theguardian.com


James Flexner

Earlier this year, a new editorial team was assembled to take over the editorship of Australasian Historical Archaeology beginning with the 2018 issue (the 2017 issue is being guest edited by Katherine Watson). The team consists of Annie Clarke and James Flexner from the University of Sydney, and Penny Crook and Sarah Hayes from La Trobe University.

We are very excited about the opportunity to work on and develop this journal, which has been so influential in the region and historical archaeology more generally. We plan to spend 2017 assessing the status of AHA in comparison with like local and international journals — many of which are migrating to large publishing houses— ‘benchmarking’ its content, format, production, delivery, promotion, indexation and reach (citations and ‘impact’), along with other endeavours such as Early Career Researcher (ECR) mentoring. This would provide an evidence-based approach to setting the long-term direction of AHA’s future production and promotion, to ensure it continues to serve the membership and goals of the Society. We plan to prepare a ‘benchmarking’ report to deliver to the Committee in early August, well in advance of the AGM. Of course, we look forward to input and discussion from ASHA membership as AHA continues to evolve as an important forum for publication in historical archaeology in our region and beyond.

Meet the new team:

Anne (Annie) Clarke has over 35 years of experience in archaeological, heritage and museological research. Her research interests include the archaeology of Arnhem Land, the archaeology of cross-cultural engagement and colonialism, rock art and historical mark-making practices, ethnographic collections and objects, community archaeology, narrative archaeology and critical heritage. She has co-edited eight volumes on archaeology, heritage and museum studies, as well as three special journal issues. Her two most recent edited volumes are That was Then, This is Now: Contemporary Archaeology and Material Cultures in Australia (2016) with Ursula Frederick and Object Stories: artifacts and archaeologists with Steve Brown and Ursula Frederick. She is the joint author with Peter Hobbins and Ursula Frederick of Stories from the Sandstone: Quarantine Inscriptions from Australia’s Immigrant Past (2016).

Penny Crook has over 20 years’ experience in historical archaeology as a consultant and academic archaeologist. Her research interests include 19th-century material culture, assemblage analysis, consumer studies, urban archaeology and digital data management. She is currently completing a DECRA fellowship at La Trobe University although she continues to be based in Sydney. She has published several papers and monographs, including a co-authored monograph (with Peter Davies and Tim Murray) in Studies in Australasian Historical Archaeology. A long-standing member of ASHA, she has served in a number of roles including Editorial Assistant, Secretary and Vice President. She is currently Assistant Editor of Post-Medieval Archaeology and on the Editorial Advisory Board of Australian Archaeology.

James Flexner has published widely in international journals and scholarly books. His primary areas of research are historical archaeology, landscape archaeology, and the archaeology of Oceania (including the historical archaeology of Australia). He has also been a regular reviewer for refereed journals, including the International Journal of Historical Archaeology, Journal of Pacific Archaeology, and Australasian Historical Archaeology. He has just completed editing a forthcoming volume of the journal Museum Worlds, and will be editing a forum for the Journal of Contemporary Archaeology. His first book, An Archaeology of Early Christianity in Vanuatu, was published by ANU Press in 2016.

Sarah Hayes is a DECRA fellow in Archaeology at La Trobe University. Her research focus is on urban archaeology, comparative artefact analysis, class construction and social mobility. She has published a number of papers along with a monograph in the Studies in Australasian Historical Archaeology series titled Good Taste, Fashion, Luxury: A genteel Melbourne family and their rubbish. Sarah has served for a number of years as book reviews editor for Australasian Historical Archaeology, newsletter editor for the Society for Historical Archaeology and as a reviewer for a number of journals. She has also worked as a tutor at La Trobe University, as an artefact specialist in consulting archaeology and in the management of moveable heritage in the museum and cultural heritage contexts.



Penny Sharpe, Shadow Minister for Environment and Heritage

This is just a short note to thank those of you who were able to attend the forum this week celebrating World Heritage Day and the 40th anniversary of the NSW Heritage Act.

Opposition Leader Luke Foley outlined Labor’s Five Point Plan for Heritage Protection, which includes:

1. Develop and deliver the first-ever NSW State Heritage Strategy.
2. Remove the ability of the State Government itself to use the economic hardship provision of the Heritage Act to refuse a building heritage protection.
3. Stop a Heritage Minister ignoring out of hand a recommendation from the Heritage Council to protect a particular place, by introducing a public hearing to allow the advocates for preservation another opportunity to make their case.
4. Restore the Office of Heritage within the Department of Premier and Cabinet so that heritage issues are at the centre of government decision-making.
5. Relocate the Office of the Premier and the Cabinet room to one of Sydney’s pre-eminent public buildings, the Chief Secretary’s building on the corner of Bridge and Macquarie streets.

More detail of this plan can be found in his full speech here.

I also want to thank the other speakers at the forum. They have made available a copy of their speeches:
Meredith Burgmann spoke about the role of the green bans and community action to save buildings, bush and parks across Sydney.
Reece McDougall shared his views about the role of the Heritage Office and the challenges for the future.
Shaun Carter spoke about why the Sirius building court decision will set an important precedent for future heritage protection. Shaun also outlined just how little of our heritage is protected.
Paul Connell outlined how important keeping stonemason and heritage trade skills in the public sector will be into the future.

It was inspiring to see how much interest there was in the forum. I look forward to working with you in the lead-up to 2019 to put more meat on the bones of Labor’s Heritage Policy.



Fenella Atkinson

It is nearly National Archaeology Week – third week in May. Please tell everyone you know, and come along to at least three events in each state. We are posting events as the details come through, so keep an eye on the website and Facebook page:

http://www.archaeologyweek.com
https://www.facebook.com/National-Archaeology-Week-179612978799261/

If you have something planned for NAW, or have any ideas or suggestions, please do get in touch – contact details are:

NSW - Helen Nicholson (nhelen@tpg.com.au)
Qld – Paddy Waterson (paddy.waterson@gmail.com)
SA - Antoinette Hennessy (antoinette.hennessy@flinders.edu.au)
Tas – Sam Dix (samuel.dix@griffithuni.edu.au)
Vic – Caroline Spry (c.spry@latrobe.edu.au)
WA – Wendy Reynen (wa@australianarchaeology.com)
Website / Facebook / Twitter – Luke Kirkwood (luke.kirkwood@gmail.com)
National – me (fenella.atkinson@gmail.com)

Please note that there is not, to my knowledge, any co-ordinator in the Northern Territory. If you are reading this in the NT, tag you’re it no returns, thanks heaps and I look forward to working with you.

Also, keep an ear out for the following chats about NAW among other things on the radio soon – tune in or download the podcasts:

Craig Barker will discuss National Archaeology Week (along with Indiana Jones) in his monthly ‘Can You Dig It’ program with Rhianna Patrick, ABC Radio, 6.30pm, Sunday 23 April 2017 http://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/rhiannapatrick/

Lesley Beaumont and James Flexner will be talking about archaeology and National Archaeology Week with Sarah Macdonald on Nightlife, ABC Radio, 9pm Saturday 13 May 2017 http://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/nightlife/