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ASHA NEWS



Caiti D'Gluyas, Helen Nicholson and Iain Stuart

Fancy catching up over a cleansing ale with fellow archaeologists? Or, perhaps you just wish to meet people you don’t know or may not have seen for a while? ASHA is looking to expand opportunities for networking and professional development and would appreciate your input and ideas.

‘Archaeology in the Pub’ is popular in the UK where a short talk is given followed by discussions. Interested? Then come along to the Shakespeare Hotel from 5.30 pm on Thursday 14 September. Enjoy free bar snacks and help us shape future Archaeology in the Pub and professional development events.

The Shakespeare Hotel is at 200 Devonshire Street in Surry Hills, just a few minutes walk from the Southern exit of Central Station.

It would be helpful (but not essential) if you could RSVP to secretary@asha.org.au.



Simon Blight

Restoration work is currently being undertaken by the Southern Midlands Council on the 1827 Commissariat building (see above image, provided by Simon Blight), the oldest building in the Oatlands Military precinct. The council purchased the Commissariat and the later Victorian shop & cottage, which both stand on the same block at 79 High Street, Oatlands. Both buildings are currently being restored, a process which aims to retain as much original fabric as possible. Wheere this is not possible a like for like approach is being utilised. The restoration work is being undertaken by the Centre for Heritage, Heritage Education and Skills Centre and the Heritage Re-Generation project participants – a heritage building skills training program for youth 16-24 years of age. Once complete, the shop and cottage building will be returned to the community for their use, and the Commissariat will be used for Heritage Education and Skill Centre training.

The Commissariat was built of sandstone atop a steep slope to house provisions for the military and convicts. Originally a guardhouse stood nearby the Commissariat to house the corporal and privates who guarded to convict chain gang. The guardhouse was demolished in the 1970s.

Archaeologically monitored clearance of the underfloor of the skillion has revealed many interesting discoveries from the topsoil, which has not been disturbed for decades. An area of built up soil from the 1840s timber skillion was removed to allow work on the timber framework and to reveal the footing of the building. The soil was sieved  and revealed numerous ceramic and glass fragments, hand forged nails, clay pipe bowl and stem sections, an 1850s trade token and several clay marbles. A clay pipe bowl and list of items received was also discovered in the roof structure.

A close up of etched lettering on sandstone blacks, image provided by: Simon Blight

Perhaps the most interesting discovery so far has been on the Commissariat building itself. During removal of built up soil, the foundation of a chimney was discovered. Etched letters and numerals were uncovered on the sandstone blocks on the external side wall which have been covered by a later addition lean-to shed. The main etched graffiti is the numeral 40, which appears multiple times along the external wall, along with initials and the year 1829. At this stage the meaning of the marks is unknown; convict marks or a regiment number, perhaps?



ASHA/IA Conference Committee

Early bird registration for the joint ASHA/IA Conference have been extended! The new early bird deadline is 5pm on September 4, so get in quick to take advantage before conference fees rise by $50! Follow this link to register.



Paul Macgregor, The Uncovered Past Institute

The Uncovered Past Institute will be undertaking the first archaeological excavation in Victoria of a Chinese mining settlement between 9th - 28th October 2017. For around thirty years from the late 1850s Harrietville was home to hundreds of Victoria’s Chinese gold miners. The largely undisturbed site includes mine workings, water races, building foundations, and gardens: a rare survivor of the heyday of Chinese gold mining in Victoria.

The project, happening over three weeks in October 2017, will be led by archaeologist Gordon Grimwade and run as a field school, and funded by public participation, along the lines of public field schools held overseas. It is an initiative of The Uncovered Past Institute, a not-for-profit organisation established in 2016 to run archaeology projects based on public participation. Students and members of the public are encouraged to participate in this excavation.

The project team includes archaeologists Gordon Grimwade, Melissa Dunk, Jennifer Chandler, Allison Carrol and Asa Ferrier; and historians Paul Macgregor, Diann Talbot and Andrew Swift.

Highlights of project participation include:
Intensive training, and participation in, fieldwork (site excavation, site surveying), and artefact processing (cleaning, recording, identifying and cataloguing).
A maximum of 4 participants for every supervising archaeologist in our team.
Guided history and heritage tours of the Upper Ovens Valley, focusing on mining history and the Chinese pioneers of the Valley.
Daily and evening workshops and lectures.
Working alongside some of the most experienced archaeologists and historians of Chinese heritage, and mining heritage, in Australia.
Learning how to identify Chinese artefacts such as ceramics, coins, bottles, foodstuffs and beverages, medicines and opium-smoking paraphernalia.
Being a part of archaeological discovery in one of the key areas of 19th century Chinese mining history in Australia.

For more information, please visit the project website:www.uncoveredpast.org.au/harrietville-chinese-mining-village/



The Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia

The Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia (ISCA) is currently undertaking a review of the IS rating scheme and as part of that review, ISCA is updating the Heritage Category. By aspiring to go beyond ‘business as usual’ in how we manage and advocate Heritage within infrastructure, great outcomes can be achieved for industry, government and community. We would like to invite you to have your say on the draft criteria that will inform how Heritage is assessed against national best practice. A survey has been prepared to gain your understanding and experience with heritage and infrastructure, as well as providing feedback of how we can improve our proposed criteria.

You will also have the opportunity to sign up to be a part of our Australian and New Zealand stakeholder interviews to further explore how heritage and sustainability principles can be incorporated into the rating system. Please click the link to go to the survey https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ISCAHeritage , otherwise if you would like further information on this project please contact Flavia Kiperman via email at Flavia.Kiperman@tpgwa.com.au.

Please note that the survey closes on 18 August.



University of Sydney

The University of Sydney presents a lecture by Nathalie Cohen, Head of Community Archaeology at the Museum of London Archaeology: Knole Unlocked- The secret history of a country mansion. This lecture will take place on 17 August 2017, and the evening will include champagne and pies.

Knole is one of England's largest country houses and is owned by the National Trust. Over the last five years, a major program of conservation has been underway, supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund. This has involved repairs to the roofs and exterior, and extensive work within the showrooms, removing panelling and lifting floorboards to allow for repairs and new services. Archaeological investigation and recording of these previously unseen areas has greatly enhanced our understanding of this great house and this presentation will describe discoveries made during the course of this project.

Nathalie Cohen has worked on a number of different archaeological projects over the past 20 years, including: the Monuments at Risk Survey in the East Midlands, the Grimes London Archive Project and the Thames Archaeological Survey, and overseas at sites in Israel, the Czech Republic and Romania. She has also worked at the Museum of London Archaeology Service (now MOLA); as the Archivist for the unit, as a field archaeologist on excavations, and as a foreshore and built heritage specialist, on sites across Greater London, Kent, Buckinghamshire, Somerset, Devon and Surrey. She is currently an Honorary Research Associate at UCL, and also the Cathedral Archaeologist for Canterbury Cathedral.

Event details
6.00pm - 7.30pm Nicholson Museum The Quadrangle
Cost: $40, $30 for Friends of the Nicholson Museum and their Guests. $10 for Students.
RSVP: Please follow the link to register and pay online. http://bit.ly/nicholsonevents



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

The Heritage Act 2017 which becomes operative on 1 November 2017 is proposed to be supported by new Victorian Heritage Regulations 2017 and Heritage (Underwater Cultural Heritage) Regulations 2017 announced by the Minister for Planning. The Regulations will “set fees for certain activities, set penalties and infringement offences, require details and results of historical archaeological surveys to be provided to the Executive Director, prescribe documents and forms for activities established by the Heritage Act 2017”. A Regulations Impact Statement (RIS) has been prepared, and comments are invited on this and the two sets of Regulations themselves. The closing date for submission of comments is Friday 28th July.

For more information, please see the following link:

https://www.heritage.vic.gov.au/legislation/heritage-regulations


 




Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

Excavation of the historic Bridge Inn Hotel is taking place at Mernda, north-east of Melbourne. Archaeologists have uncovered footings of the early hotel just under the top soil. Various artefacts have been found, as well as aboriginal artefacts. An open day is being held on Saturday, 8th of July between 10am-2pm.

For more information, please see the following links:

http://levelcrossings.vic.gov.au/media-library/news/archaeological-dig-underway-in-mernda
        

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/north/bridge-inn-south-morang-archaeological-dig-makes-key-discoveries/news-story/48359c71371a03f5e024dab1cdf93f04


http://www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/north/archeologists-dig-deep-to-uncover-mysterious-history-of-bridge-inn-hotel-in-mernda/news-story/74b66d48466c478b4d196e40d3d622cd





Googong Township

Navin Officer Heritage Consultants (NOHC) archaeologists have begun work unearthing some of the Canberra region’s early European settlement - a lost nineteenth century schoolhouse in Googong. The dig is being run by Googong Township Pty Ltd in partnership with NOHC and is part of the extensive environmental and heritage survey works being undertaken at Googong. NOHC project Excavation Director and ANU archaeology graduate Dr Rebecca Parkes said the school was a missing piece of local history.

“The school operated into the 20th century but there are very few historical records for it and nobody could remember where it was, so it was lost. We’re hoping the project gives us a nice window into rural life in that period, as there has been very little archaeological evidence found from that period in this area before.”

People are invited to view the archaeological site. Spots are strictly limited and must be booked in advance.

All visitors must wear enclosed flat shoes and be able to comfortably walk along a gently undulating farm trail for approx 800m-1km from the meeting spot to the site (10 minute walk), where they will receive a talk and tour of the site of approximately 30 minutes before returning to their cars. The event is subject to weather. Children must be under the care of a responsible adult at all times.

What:  Archaeological site visit of Googong's first school c.1880's.

When: Saturday 24 June 2017. Session times are strictly 10am, 11am, 12pm and 1pm. A max of 20 people can be booked in each session. Sessions are one hour each.

Registrations: Bookings are strictly limited and may be made via email to enquiries@googong.net. Please be sure to include your preferred session time, your full name and mobile number, and the full names of individuals in your party. We will confirm your booking via email and include details of where to meet.



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

The Broken Hill City Council are taking steps to discover if the city is able to be added to the World Heritage Register, following it being recently added to the National Heritage Register in 2015. Through the potential listing, the Council aims to diversify the economy in the area, by increasing tourism and tackling the population decline that it is currently experiencing.

For more information, please see the following links:
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-06-12/push-to-get-broken-hill-on-world-heritage-city-list/8610180?platform=hootsuite


http://www.environment.gov.au/cgi-bin/ahdb/search.pl?mode=place_detail;place_id=105861


Image: Broken Hill Town Hall, sourced from the National Heritage Listing website, as above.