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ASHA NEWS



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

A 19th century school house has been excavated as part of developments in Googong, NSW. The excavation involved consultant and ANU student archaeologists, and recieved visits from local school children. Artefacts including slate pencils were found among the foundations.

For more information, please see the following links:

http://www.theage.com.au/act-news/anu-archaeologists-unearth-19th-century-history-at-googong-20170605-gwkgqy.html

http://www.archaeology.org/news/5605-170605-australia-school-house



Compiled by Angela Middleton and Bronwyn Woff

Excavations undertaken as part of the new Auckland City Rail Link have uncovered some interesting artefacts from the rear of the Auckland Chief Post Office building. The excavations will continue as more of the City Rail Link is constructed. For more information, please see the following link:  http://ourauckland.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/articles/news/2017/06/interesting-historical-artefacts-dug-up-in-crl-excavations/




Alex Rose, Lithodomos VR Marketing Director

Lithodomos VR presented at the recent SHAP workshop in Sydney. The technology they produce may be of interest for site interpretations.

Shortly after its seed funding round earlier this year, Lithodomos VR further cemented its reputation as the leading archaeology VR content production studio when it took to the road on an European tour of epic proportions in order to showcase samples of its work. Fellow archaeologists, museums directors, tour operators and university students were spellbound and delighted in: Spain, Italy, Malta, Israel, Germany, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, the UK and Portugal. Those who experienced Lithodomos VR’s archaeologically accurate content were consistently astonished and delighted by what they saw. The excitement was most tangible when demonstrations took place at archaeological sites at precisely georeferenced locations. “I think it helps you engage more, especially when some of what’s left is just at the bottom of a pillar”, remarked a young British visitor to the Athenian agora.

Lithodomos VR is being secretive about its future projects. However, it has indicated that their mobile VR experience will soon be deployed at two major European locations. “We’re working on something that’s unlike anything we’ve ever done before,” stated a company spokesperson. “Tourism, archaeology, and education will never be the same again.”

For more information please see: https://lithodomosvr.com/



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

The Hyde Parks Barracks website has recently been rediscovered, and has been suggested as a "blast from the past" for the blog. The website includes various images of excavations from the 1980's, which you can check out here:https://sydneylivingmuseums.com.au/stories/archaeology-action-hyde-park-barracks

An excerpt from the page states:

In 1979 a major restoration of Hyde Park Barracks was begun, and by September 1980 the Barracks became the subject of the first publicly-funded archaeological excavation in New South Wales. Test trenches were opened by archaeologist Wendy Thorp, and then for 14 weeks throughout 1981 the site was under excavation by a team of 11 archaeologists, a conservator, a photographer and 250 volunteers, led by archaeologist Patricia Burritt.

...

During these excavations archaeologists discovered over 120,000 artefacts around the site, including over 80,000 recovered from beneath the floors of the upper levels of the dormitory building, where objects had been trapped for up to 160 years. An estimated 80 per cent were left behind by women of the Female Immigration Depot, the Hyde Park Asylum for aged and destitute women and courts and government offices, and the remaining 20 per cent survived the installation of new ceilings in 1848, and date from the convict period.



Compiled by Richard Morrison

A call for comment by COB 14 July 2017 on the proposed National Heritage listing of the Queen Victoria Markets in Melbourne has been made by the Australian Heritage Council. The Council’s initial assessment is that the Markets might have National Heritage values. A draft map and description of potential National Heritage values are available at:

http://www.environment.gov.au/heritage/organisations/australian-heritage-council/national-heritage-assessments/queen-victoria-market-proposed-national-heritage-listing

National Archaeology Week Committee

National Archaeology Week aims to increase public awareness of Australian archaeology and the work of Australian archaeologists at home and abroad. It also promotes the importance of protecting Australia's unique archaeological heritage.

A nationwide program of events and exhibitions is held in May each year, including public talks, walking tours and displays.

Please see the following pages for more information:
http://www.archaeologyweek.com/
https://www.facebook.com/archaeologyweek/

Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

Judy Birmingham, prominent archaeologist, has been awarded a Lifetime Achievement Heritage Award from the NSW National Trust for her various contributions to the discipline, including her teaching role at University of Sydney and co-writing the conservation guidelines for the NSW Department of Planning.


For more about Judy Birmingham, her various acheivments, and other Heritage Awardees see the following links:

https://www.nationaltrust.org.au/heritage-awards-nsw/
https://www.nationaltrust.org.au/heritage-awards-2017-winners/
http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/


Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

Members may be interested to explore context posted to a new archaeology and anthropology blog hosted on The Guardian's website, entitled The Past and The Curious. The blog can be found at the following link:

www.theguardian.com



Penny Sharpe, Shadow Minister for Environment and Heritage

This is just a short note to thank those of you who were able to attend the forum this week celebrating World Heritage Day and the 40th anniversary of the NSW Heritage Act.

Opposition Leader Luke Foley outlined Labor’s Five Point Plan for Heritage Protection, which includes:

1. Develop and deliver the first-ever NSW State Heritage Strategy.
2. Remove the ability of the State Government itself to use the economic hardship provision of the Heritage Act to refuse a building heritage protection.
3. Stop a Heritage Minister ignoring out of hand a recommendation from the Heritage Council to protect a particular place, by introducing a public hearing to allow the advocates for preservation another opportunity to make their case.
4. Restore the Office of Heritage within the Department of Premier and Cabinet so that heritage issues are at the centre of government decision-making.
5. Relocate the Office of the Premier and the Cabinet room to one of Sydney’s pre-eminent public buildings, the Chief Secretary’s building on the corner of Bridge and Macquarie streets.

More detail of this plan can be found in his full speech here.

I also want to thank the other speakers at the forum. They have made available a copy of their speeches:
Meredith Burgmann spoke about the role of the green bans and community action to save buildings, bush and parks across Sydney.
Reece McDougall shared his views about the role of the Heritage Office and the challenges for the future.
Shaun Carter spoke about why the Sirius building court decision will set an important precedent for future heritage protection. Shaun also outlined just how little of our heritage is protected.
Paul Connell outlined how important keeping stonemason and heritage trade skills in the public sector will be into the future.

It was inspiring to see how much interest there was in the forum. I look forward to working with you in the lead-up to 2019 to put more meat on the bones of Labor’s Heritage Policy.



Fenella Atkinson

It is nearly National Archaeology Week – third week in May. Please tell everyone you know, and come along to at least three events in each state. We are posting events as the details come through, so keep an eye on the website and Facebook page:

http://www.archaeologyweek.com
https://www.facebook.com/National-Archaeology-Week-179612978799261/

If you have something planned for NAW, or have any ideas or suggestions, please do get in touch – contact details are:

NSW - Helen Nicholson (nhelen@tpg.com.au)
Qld – Paddy Waterson (paddy.waterson@gmail.com)
SA - Antoinette Hennessy (antoinette.hennessy@flinders.edu.au)
Tas – Sam Dix (samuel.dix@griffithuni.edu.au)
Vic – Caroline Spry (c.spry@latrobe.edu.au)
WA – Wendy Reynen (wa@australianarchaeology.com)
Website / Facebook / Twitter – Luke Kirkwood (luke.kirkwood@gmail.com)
National – me (fenella.atkinson@gmail.com)

Please note that there is not, to my knowledge, any co-ordinator in the Northern Territory. If you are reading this in the NT, tag you’re it no returns, thanks heaps and I look forward to working with you.

Also, keep an ear out for the following chats about NAW among other things on the radio soon – tune in or download the podcasts:

Craig Barker will discuss National Archaeology Week (along with Indiana Jones) in his monthly ‘Can You Dig It’ program with Rhianna Patrick, ABC Radio, 6.30pm, Sunday 23 April 2017 http://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/rhiannapatrick/

Lesley Beaumont and James Flexner will be talking about archaeology and National Archaeology Week with Sarah Macdonald on Nightlife, ABC Radio, 9pm Saturday 13 May 2017 http://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/nightlife/