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ASHA NEWS



Bronwyn Woff

Developers are planning to build a multi-story office block on the heritage-listed former Dennys Lascelles Wool Store in Geelong, Victoria. The Wool Store was built in 1872, for a company that became one of the most significant wool-broking businesses in Australia, and is listed for its state significance. For more information, see:

https://architectureau.com/articles/heritage-listed-geelong-wool-store-to-become-high-rise-office-block/
http://www.smh.com.au/business/property/techne-pitches-tower-for-geelong-wool-stores-20170905-gyb6ds.html



ASHA committee/University of Sydney

Dr Barra Ó Donnabháin will soon present a free public lecture: Our experiment at Spike Island: archaeology of a Victorian convict depot in Ireland . Dr Donnabháin's visit has been sponsored by the Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology, ahead of the 2017 conference.

The lecture will focus of the Spike Island Archaeological Project is the Victorian convict depot that, opened in 1847 at the height of the Great Irish Famine and closed in 1883. In the 1850s, the prison was the largest in the then United Kingdom. The convict depot was an important holding centre for convicts transported to Bermuda, Gibraltar and Van Diemen's Land, and it operated during a critical period for the development of the modern prison system.

A combination of archival and archaeological research provides a means of investigating daily life in the prison and the triangle of relationships between convicts, warders and the institution. At a broader level, Spike Island is an important site for the exploration of complex questions of inequality and race, as well as the ambivalences and contradictions of empire.

The lecture will take place on 17th October, 5.30pm - 6.30pm at the Nicholson Museum, University of Sydney.

For more information, and to register please see: http://whatson.sydney.edu.au/events/published/our-experiment-at-spike-island



Bronwyn Woff

A 'ghost' advertising sign of Peapes menswear store has been uncovered in Wynyard, Sydney as the building next to it was demolished. Peapes was closed in 1970, and the building which covered the advertisement was constructed in the 1960s. The lack of sunlight and harsh weatherconditions have kept the paint safe for more than 50 years. The building on which the advertisement is painted is known as Beneficial House, and is Heritage Listed.  For more images and information: www.smh.com.au/

Image from SMH article, by Steven Siewert



Bronwyn Woff

Heritage New Zealand and Spokes Canterbury (cycling advocacy group based in Christchurch) are holding a guided cycling tour around Christchurch City. The tour will take place on 15th October, 10am to 11.30am and 2pm to 3.30pm. The guided cycling tour is free, but bookings are required:  https://ccc.govt.nz/news-and-events/events/show/12   Self-guided tour brochures are also available from Heritage New Zealand.



Caiti D'Gluyas

One of the most significant finds from the 2002 Casselden Place, Melbourne, archaeological investigations (50 Lonsdale Street) was a medal struck to commemorate the Cessation of Convict Transportation (see images below, source: GML Heritage). The medal commemorates not only the victory of the anti-transportation movement but also the 50th anniversary of the founding of Tasmania on 10th August 1853.

The medal's design was approved by the Anti-Transportation League committee in 1853 before being fabricated in England. The medals finally arrived in Australia for distribution in 1855. The medal features James Wyon's portrait of Queen Victoria on one side, with the reverse showing the armorial bearings for Tasmania in a shield. James Wyon was a resident engraver at the Royal Mint and is best known for engraving the dies for sovereigns and half-sovereigns at the new Sydney branch of the Royal Mint. The shield is quartered by the Southern Cross and bears pastoral, commercial and agricultural emblems supported by the emu and kangaroo, surmounted by a rising sun motif.

The medal was cast in three different metals. One single medal was struck in gold for presentation to Queen Victoria, 100 were struck in bronze for committee members and 9000 were struck in white metal for general distribution. The medal recovered from Casselden Place appears to be a bronze issue. Many of the white metal medals went to Tasmanian school children. At the cessation celebrations, each child was given a piece of cake and a ticket enabling them to receive a medal, once they had arrived in the colony. On 3 August 1855, 9000 medals arrived in Launceston and 4000 were immediately dispatched to Hobart. Another 3000 were held in Launceston and 2000 were distributed to Green Ponds, Norfolk Plains, Ross, Evandale, Longford and other country districts.

The medal is now in the collection of Museum Victoria as part of a set of archaeological assemblages from the ‘Little Lon’ precinct. The most recent and concluding historical archaeological excavation at ‘Little Lon’ was undertaken between April and July 2017 for the 271 Spring Street development. An interpretation scheme for this excavation is currently being prepared by GML Heritage and will draw together the multiple phases of archaeological investigation that has occurred within the precinct. The medal provides an opportunity to interpret a fascinating story about ‘the hated stain’ of transportation.

References:
McNeice, R 1990, Tasmanian commemorative medals and medallions 1853–1900: A collector's handbook, Taroona.
Mint Issue September 2003, Royal Australia Mint.



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

During a three day meeting, the Canterbury Synod has made the decision to restore the Christchurch Cathedral which was damaged during the 2011 earthquakes. The NZ Government and Christchurch City Council offered $35 million and fast-tracked legislation if restoration was the option chosen. The Cathedral is a Category 1 listed building under Heritage New Zealand, being of regional, national and international significance. Bishop Victoria Matthews felt that the Cathedral would be restored within 10 years.

For more information, see the following news article: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11920249

Image by By New Zealand Defence Force showing the Cathedral the day after the earthquake https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=13698444



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

The Heritage Listed QANTAS hangar at Longreach has turned 95. The hangar was where QANTAS first began it's operations, and is now the location of the QANTAS Founders Museum. The Museum hosted a morning tea to celebrate the hangars birthday, which was added to the Register in 2009. For more information, please see:

https://qfom.com.au/2017/08/07/media-release-national-heritage-listed-qantas-hangar-turns-95/

Image: Photo take on 2 November 1922 on the arrival of the first scheduled Qantas flight from Charleville to Longreach, sourced from above article



State Library of New South Wales

The winners of The 2017 NSW Premier’s History Awards, were recently announced at the State Library of NSW, as part of the official launch of NSW History Week. Archaeologists Anne Clarke, Ursula Frederick and historian Peter Hobbins were awarded the NSW Community and Regional History Prize for their publication "Stories from the Sandstone: Quarantine Inscriptions from Australia’s Immigrant Past".


Anne Clarke, Ursula Frederick and Peter Hobbins

Judges of the award stated:
"The North Head Quarantine Station operated from the 1830s until it closed in 1984; it served as a holding station for passengers on inbound ships to New South Wales arriving from well known hotspots for contagious diseases. Stories from the Sandstone examines around 1600 engravings in many different languages that were carved into the rocks and walls around the Quarantine Station during its 150 year history.

The book is beautifully illustrated with photographs of the engravings and paintings of the area. In addition to the inscriptions and graffiti, sources include official records, personal recollections, unpublished diaries, private correspondence, family trees and various archives. The authors draw from this rich body of sources to spotlight individuals who passed through the station and left their signatures in stone.

This fascinating and accomplished history of the Quarantine Station firmly locates the experiences of the local within the broader context of the global. It covers the history of immigration to Australia, the conditions of ship travel for men, women and children,the start of government public health measures and the establishment of official quarantine policies to manage arrivals and the spread of disease. It is a history contoured by how the governments of the day applied ideas of gender, race and culture to the treatment of diverse individuals. Such local experiences are set within the broader transnational framework of the history of trade, trade routes, theories of disease and pandemics"

Other prizes awarded include:
Australian History Prize ($15,000)From the Edge: Australia’s Lost Histories, Mark McKenna (Melbourne University Publishing)
General History Prize ($15,000)Japanese War Criminals: The Politics of Justice After the Second World War, Sandra Wilson, Robert Cribb, Beatrice Trefalt and Dean Aszkielowicz (Columbia University Press)
Young People’s History Prize ($15,000)Maralinga’s Long Shadow: Yvonne’s Story, Christobel Mattingley (Allen and Unwin)
Multimedia History Prize ($15,000)The Amboyna Conspiracy Trial, Adam Clulow (Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media)



Alison Frappell

In the following podcast, Holly Maclean (Heritage Consultant with Urbis) talks to ABC radio Brisbane about her work as part of Queen’s Wharf redevelopment, including her archaeological monitoring role alongside the construction teams, the genesis of Brisbane’s city streetscape, using diagnostic features to date bottles and the significance of Edison Street Tube artefacts discovered during the services diversions work: http://www.abc.net.au/radio/brisbane/programs/breakfast/queens-wharf-archaeology-holly-maclean/8895530

For more information, please see this update from January: https://urbis.com.au/insights-news/heritage-work-begins-at-queens-wharf-ahead-of-construction/



Prof Richard Mackay

The Heritage Council of Victoria is considering the feasibility of preparing a new ‘Victorian Heritage Strategy’. The previous strategy – Victoria’s Heritage: Strengthening Our Communities – operated between 2006 and 2010, but in the period since there have been significant changes, which provide the context for considering a new Heritage Strategy.

Mackay Strategic (Richard Mackay) has been commissioned to prepare a ‘feasibility study’ which looks at the opportunities, scope and implications for a new Victorian Heritage Strategy. As part of this process, stakeholders in Victoria’s Heritage are being invited to use this short survey to express opinions about a new heritage strategy – the merits, issues, opportunities and priorities at the outset of the feasibility assessment.

The survey can be accessed here and will take approximately 15 minutes to complete. (Please note that it is best to avoid Internet Explorer or to ensure that internet settings are Google compatible). Your contribution by 30 September would be greatly appreciated.