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ASHA NEWS



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff =

Members in New South Wales and beyond may be interested in the following article which discusses the upcoming sale of the Heritage Listed Sydney GPO, which was opened in 1874, by Australia Post. For more information, please see the following link:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-06-01/historic-sydney-building-being-sold-despite-heritage-concerns/8578782?platform=hootsuite

Image: Powerhouse Museum "General Post Office, Sydney" https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3851259



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

The Hyde Parks Barracks website has recently been rediscovered, and has been suggested as a "blast from the past" for the blog. The website includes various images of excavations from the 1980's, which you can check out here:https://sydneylivingmuseums.com.au/stories/archaeology-action-hyde-park-barracks

An excerpt from the page states:

In 1979 a major restoration of Hyde Park Barracks was begun, and by September 1980 the Barracks became the subject of the first publicly-funded archaeological excavation in New South Wales. Test trenches were opened by archaeologist Wendy Thorp, and then for 14 weeks throughout 1981 the site was under excavation by a team of 11 archaeologists, a conservator, a photographer and 250 volunteers, led by archaeologist Patricia Burritt.

...

During these excavations archaeologists discovered over 120,000 artefacts around the site, including over 80,000 recovered from beneath the floors of the upper levels of the dormitory building, where objects had been trapped for up to 160 years. An estimated 80 per cent were left behind by women of the Female Immigration Depot, the Hyde Park Asylum for aged and destitute women and courts and government offices, and the remaining 20 per cent survived the installation of new ceilings in 1848, and date from the convict period.



Jessie Garland and Angel Trendafilov, Underground Overground Archaeology

Angel Trendafilov, of Underground Overground Archaeology, has been monitoring the bulk out of the new Convention Centre in Christchurch with the assistance of Kirsa Webb, Tristan Wadsworth, Teri Anderson, Hamish Williams and Peter Mitchell. The site, which was home to a variety of commercial, professional and residential activities in the 19th century, has yielded a large (and still growing) artefact assemblage, several brick lined and artesian wells (see below image), a large number of rubbish pits, and structural features.


Many of the artefacts date to the 1840s-1860s period, suggesting that at least some of the material found may be associated with the early decades of European settlement in Christchurch. The assemblage contains a wide range of artefact types, including several unusual clay smoking pipes, elaborately decorated glass vessels and uncommon ceramics.


Notable artefacts so far include: an early 19th century imitation Mason's jug; a Price and Co. Bear's Grease pot lid; and an imitation engraved Batavian ware dish (see above image).

     

We have also uncovered a French clay pipe with a moulded Native American figure on the bowl (see above image) and a floor tile made by Jackson and Bishop, one of the earliest large scale brick making companies in Christchurch (see below image).


We don't yet know whether the artefact assemblages relate to the residential, commercial or professional uses of the site, but it is worth mentioning that there was a fancy goods store and an auctioneers among the many occupants crammed on to these sections in the 1860s and 1870s.


 

For more information about the archaeology of Christchurch, check out the Underground Overground Archaeology blog "Christchurch Uncovered" at:  http://blog.underoverarch.co.nz/

Artefact images: Jessie Garland
Excavation images: Hamish Williams




Richard Brassey, Auckland Council

A World War II aircraft crash site at Whenuapai west of Auckland was investigated in April-May by a team lead by Simon Bickler in conjunction with Auckland Council. A USAAF B17E flying fortress (‘Texas Tornado’) which had been on a secret mission to New Zealand crashed and exploded shortly after take-off for Laverton on 9 June 1942, with eleven fatalities. The property on which the crash occurred is likely to be developed in the near future. The aim of the project was to undertake a controlled excavation of a large infilled 500 lb bomb crater at the site in a way that would allow recovery of any human remains, personal items, unexploded ordnance and definitive crash relics. The finds recovered from the crash site have yet to be fully examined, but a number of items recovered will be repatriated to the US Defence Department’s Missing in Action unit.

Photo: Bomb crater prior to excavation - Richard Brassey



Compiled by Richard Morrison

A call for comment by COB 14 July 2017 on the proposed National Heritage listing of the Queen Victoria Markets in Melbourne has been made by the Australian Heritage Council. The Council’s initial assessment is that the Markets might have National Heritage values. A draft map and description of potential National Heritage values are available at:

http://www.environment.gov.au/heritage/organisations/australian-heritage-council/national-heritage-assessments/queen-victoria-market-proposed-national-heritage-listing

Compiled by Richard Morrison and Bronwyn Woff

Cornish mining sites at Burra and Moonta have recently been added to the National Heritage List. These important historic copper mining sites, representing the start of Australia’s metal mining industry, were added on 9 May 2017. Expert Cornish labour familiar with the recovery of copper ore was imported in the mid-19th century to establish the industry. The mines represent the earliest examples of Cornish mining and domestic architecture in Australia.

For more information, please see the following links:
http://www.environment.gov.au/heritage/places/national/australian-cornish-mining-sites
http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/south-australia/

ERRATUM 11-06-2017: The image previously attached to this article showed the Burra Brewery. The image now attached shows the Burra Mine.

Image of Burra Mine, showing Cornish style buildings. Supplied by Meredith Satchell, President of the Burra History Group, Inc

Fenella Atkinson

AACAI is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2017 Student Support Fund:

  • Lauren Churchill (University of Sydney) Foodways in regional New South Wales in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries: A study of butchery patterns
  • Rodina Goranitis (University of Queensland) Doing it right: Best practice standards in cultural heritage management
  • Rebekah Hawkins (University of Sydney) Exploring the relationship between raw material and morphology in a lithic assemblage from Lake George NSW: A close look at backed artefacts and core production and their connection to raw material
  • Jacinta Koolmatrie (Flinders University) Adnyamathanha Yura Malka
  • Liam Norris (Australian National University) The Aboriginal history of Ulladulla

On completion, summaries of the projects will be published in the AACAI E-News, and papers in the AACAI Journal.

We would like to acknowledge the generous support of the sponsors of the 2017 Fund:

  • Archae-aus
  • Comber Consultants
  • Everick Heritage Consultants
  • Extent Heritage
  • North Qld Cultural Heritage
  • Ochre Imprints
  • Wallis Heritage Consulting

Thank you very much to all the applicants, and best wishes with your studies.

GML Heritage

At the recent NSW National Trust Heritage awards, GML Heritage won the award for Interpretation for their Hill End Historic Site project.

Hill End Historic Site is a former gold mining town in the central west of New South Wales. The National Parks and Wildlife Service commissioned GML, with Trigger and Simon MacArthur Associates to prepare an interpretation plan to increase visitor ‘access’ to the stories, sensory qualities and character of the site.

The interpretation plan focused on revitalisation and reimagining the presentation of Hill End. It not only defined themes and heritage values, but also addressed the wider business revitalisation of the site in a holistic way, identifying revenue generation, combined with visitor and marketing opportunities to assist conservation of the place and its collections.

Innovative tourism opportunities were identified with the aim of strengthening and diversifying the visitor experience, increasing sustainability and supporting local businesses and new social entrepreneurs. The project team generated a range of engaging options and interpretive programs to address the different needs and interests of visitors. A key aim was to create an authentic visitor experience that fostered creative enterprise to engage with artisans, crafts people and other businesses that aligned with the character and identity of Hill End.

Clarifying the site’s carrying capacity and identifying ways to improve on-site visitor management, GML also market-tested interpretive initiatives and prepared costings to ensure value for money, reduce risk and maximise successful implementation.

For more information, please see the following links:
https://www.nationaltrust.org.au/education-and-interpretation-alchemy-hill-end/
http://www.gml.com.au/gml-wins-at-2017-nsw-national-trust-heritage-awards/

National Archaeology Week Committee

National Archaeology Week aims to increase public awareness of Australian archaeology and the work of Australian archaeologists at home and abroad. It also promotes the importance of protecting Australia's unique archaeological heritage.

A nationwide program of events and exhibitions is held in May each year, including public talks, walking tours and displays.

Please see the following pages for more information:
http://www.archaeologyweek.com/
https://www.facebook.com/archaeologyweek/

Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

Excavations continue at various sites across Parramatta, as part of UrbanGrowth NSW’s Parramatta North Urban Transformation Program. The program aims to conserve and better understand the area's heritage and will continue late into 2017. Sites include Aboriginal settlement areas, the Parramatta Female Factory and the Roman Catholic Orphan School. Excavations have so far uncovered knapping sites, children's toys, clerical items and a clay tobacco pipe dated from between 1847-1870.

For more information, please see the following article at:

http://www.urbangrowth.nsw.gov.au/newsroom/archaeological-digs-uncover-fascinating-finds-at-parramatta-north/