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ASHA NEWS



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

During a three day meeting, the Canterbury Synod has made the decision to restore the Christchurch Cathedral which was damaged during the 2011 earthquakes. The NZ Government and Christchurch City Council offered $35 million and fast-tracked legislation if restoration was the option chosen. The Cathedral is a Category 1 listed building under Heritage New Zealand, being of regional, national and international significance. Bishop Victoria Matthews felt that the Cathedral would be restored within 10 years.

For more information, see the following news article: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11920249

Image by By New Zealand Defence Force showing the Cathedral the day after the earthquake https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=13698444



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

Legislation in NSW that curbs the use of rail corridors for activites other than train use are changing, with a cycle and walking path to be installed between Rosewood and Turrumburra on an unused section of rail track. A single track line between Picton and Mittagong will be reinstated for use by heritage trains from the NSW Rail Museum, as well as a walking and cycling track alongside the same stretch the track.

For more information, see: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-08-22/picton-to-mittagong-return-of-the-age-of-steam/8781430



Simon Blight

Restoration work is currently being undertaken by the Southern Midlands Council on the 1827 Commissariat building (see above image, provided by Simon Blight), the oldest building in the Oatlands Military precinct. The council purchased the Commissariat and the later Victorian shop & cottage, which both stand on the same block at 79 High Street, Oatlands. Both buildings are currently being restored, a process which aims to retain as much original fabric as possible. Wheere this is not possible a like for like approach is being utilised. The restoration work is being undertaken by the Centre for Heritage, Heritage Education and Skills Centre and the Heritage Re-Generation project participants – a heritage building skills training program for youth 16-24 years of age. Once complete, the shop and cottage building will be returned to the community for their use, and the Commissariat will be used for Heritage Education and Skill Centre training.

The Commissariat was built of sandstone atop a steep slope to house provisions for the military and convicts. Originally a guardhouse stood nearby the Commissariat to house the corporal and privates who guarded to convict chain gang. The guardhouse was demolished in the 1970s.

Archaeologically monitored clearance of the underfloor of the skillion has revealed many interesting discoveries from the topsoil, which has not been disturbed for decades. An area of built up soil from the 1840s timber skillion was removed to allow work on the timber framework and to reveal the footing of the building. The soil was sieved  and revealed numerous ceramic and glass fragments, hand forged nails, clay pipe bowl and stem sections, an 1850s trade token and several clay marbles. A clay pipe bowl and list of items received was also discovered in the roof structure.

A close up of etched lettering on sandstone blacks, image provided by: Simon Blight

Perhaps the most interesting discovery so far has been on the Commissariat building itself. During removal of built up soil, the foundation of a chimney was discovered. Etched letters and numerals were uncovered on the sandstone blocks on the external side wall which have been covered by a later addition lean-to shed. The main etched graffiti is the numeral 40, which appears multiple times along the external wall, along with initials and the year 1829. At this stage the meaning of the marks is unknown; convict marks or a regiment number, perhaps?



AACAI NSW/ACT chapter

Archaeobotany for consultant archaeologists! AACAI NSW are pleased to present two speakers and a discussion on archaeobotanical sampling methods, techniques and controls for interpreting and dating archaeological sites, reconstructing past environments and understanding past Aboriginal and European land uses. Key speakers include: Dr Andrew Fairbain (University of Queensland) and Dr Emilie Dotte-Sarout (Australian National University). Attendees are invited to bring your questions for discussion!

Details

Thursday 21 September
Door opens 5:30pm for a 6:00pm start
The Big Dig Archaeology Education Centre at YHA the Rocks
Costs: AACAI Members and Students (must show student ID): Free
Non-Members: $10
Pay at the door

Please RSVP by 20 th September for catering purposes to dianacowie@gmail.com



ASHA/IA Conference Committee

Early bird registration for the joint ASHA/IA Conference have been extended! The new early bird deadline is 5pm on September 4, so get in quick to take advantage before conference fees rise by $50! Follow this link to register.



Paul Macgregor, The Uncovered Past Institute

The Uncovered Past Institute will be undertaking the first archaeological excavation in Victoria of a Chinese mining settlement between 9th - 28th October 2017. For around thirty years from the late 1850s Harrietville was home to hundreds of Victoria’s Chinese gold miners. The largely undisturbed site includes mine workings, water races, building foundations, and gardens: a rare survivor of the heyday of Chinese gold mining in Victoria.

The project, happening over three weeks in October 2017, will be led by archaeologist Gordon Grimwade and run as a field school, and funded by public participation, along the lines of public field schools held overseas. It is an initiative of The Uncovered Past Institute, a not-for-profit organisation established in 2016 to run archaeology projects based on public participation. Students and members of the public are encouraged to participate in this excavation.

The project team includes archaeologists Gordon Grimwade, Melissa Dunk, Jennifer Chandler, Allison Carrol and Asa Ferrier; and historians Paul Macgregor, Diann Talbot and Andrew Swift.

Highlights of project participation include:
Intensive training, and participation in, fieldwork (site excavation, site surveying), and artefact processing (cleaning, recording, identifying and cataloguing).
A maximum of 4 participants for every supervising archaeologist in our team.
Guided history and heritage tours of the Upper Ovens Valley, focusing on mining history and the Chinese pioneers of the Valley.
Daily and evening workshops and lectures.
Working alongside some of the most experienced archaeologists and historians of Chinese heritage, and mining heritage, in Australia.
Learning how to identify Chinese artefacts such as ceramics, coins, bottles, foodstuffs and beverages, medicines and opium-smoking paraphernalia.
Being a part of archaeological discovery in one of the key areas of 19th century Chinese mining history in Australia.

For more information, please visit the project website:www.uncoveredpast.org.au/harrietville-chinese-mining-village/

Compiled by Richard Morrison and Bronwyn Woff

Cornish mining sites at Burra and Moonta have recently been added to the National Heritage List. These important historic copper mining sites, representing the start of Australia’s metal mining industry, were added on 9 May 2017. Expert Cornish labour familiar with the recovery of copper ore was imported in the mid-19th century to establish the industry. The mines represent the earliest examples of Cornish mining and domestic architecture in Australia.

For more information, please see the following links:
http://www.environment.gov.au/heritage/places/national/australian-cornish-mining-sites
http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/south-australia/

ERRATUM 11-06-2017: The image previously attached to this article showed the Burra Brewery. The image now attached shows the Burra Mine.

Image of Burra Mine, showing Cornish style buildings. Supplied by Meredith Satchell, President of the Burra History Group, Inc

National Archaeology Week Committee

National Archaeology Week aims to increase public awareness of Australian archaeology and the work of Australian archaeologists at home and abroad. It also promotes the importance of protecting Australia's unique archaeological heritage.

A nationwide program of events and exhibitions is held in May each year, including public talks, walking tours and displays.

Please see the following pages for more information:
http://www.archaeologyweek.com/
https://www.facebook.com/archaeologyweek/



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

Monitoring has begun ahead of works to restore and protect the National Heritage Listed Richmond Bridge, which was built by convicts in 1823.

For more information, see: www.abc.net.au/news

Image taken from: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Richmond_Bridge_Panorama_Restitch.jpg     Accessed 25/03/2017



Department of Environment and Energy, Australian Government

The Australian Heritage Council is assessing Centennial Park, Sydney, for potential inclusion in the National Heritage List. The National Heritage List recognises places that are of outstanding heritage value to the nation for their natural, Indigenous and/or historic heritage values.

Please provide any written comments on this place by close of business 28 April 2017 to:
Australian Heritage Council
GPO Box 787
Canberra ACT 2601
Email: heritage@environment.gov.au

For more information, including maps and nomination paperwork, please see:  www.environment.gov.au

Image from:  https://psychedelictraveler.com/2015/04/22/centennial-park/    Accessed 25/03/2017