asha

ASHA NEWS



ASHA committee/University of Sydney

Dr Barra Ó Donnabháin will soon present a free public lecture: Our experiment at Spike Island: archaeology of a Victorian convict depot in Ireland . Dr Donnabháin's visit has been sponsored by the Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology, ahead of the 2017 conference.

The lecture will focus of the Spike Island Archaeological Project is the Victorian convict depot that, opened in 1847 at the height of the Great Irish Famine and closed in 1883. In the 1850s, the prison was the largest in the then United Kingdom. The convict depot was an important holding centre for convicts transported to Bermuda, Gibraltar and Van Diemen's Land, and it operated during a critical period for the development of the modern prison system.

A combination of archival and archaeological research provides a means of investigating daily life in the prison and the triangle of relationships between convicts, warders and the institution. At a broader level, Spike Island is an important site for the exploration of complex questions of inequality and race, as well as the ambivalences and contradictions of empire.

The lecture will take place on 17th October, 5.30pm - 6.30pm at the Nicholson Museum, University of Sydney.

For more information, and to register please see: http://whatson.sydney.edu.au/events/published/our-experiment-at-spike-island



Bronwyn Woff

A 'ghost' advertising sign of Peapes menswear store has been uncovered in Wynyard, Sydney as the building next to it was demolished. Peapes was closed in 1970, and the building which covered the advertisement was constructed in the 1960s. The lack of sunlight and harsh weatherconditions have kept the paint safe for more than 50 years. The building on which the advertisement is painted is known as Beneficial House, and is Heritage Listed.  For more images and information: www.smh.com.au/

Image from SMH article, by Steven Siewert



State Library of New South Wales

The winners of The 2017 NSW Premier’s History Awards, were recently announced at the State Library of NSW, as part of the official launch of NSW History Week. Archaeologists Anne Clarke, Ursula Frederick and historian Peter Hobbins were awarded the NSW Community and Regional History Prize for their publication "Stories from the Sandstone: Quarantine Inscriptions from Australia’s Immigrant Past".


Anne Clarke, Ursula Frederick and Peter Hobbins

Judges of the award stated:
"The North Head Quarantine Station operated from the 1830s until it closed in 1984; it served as a holding station for passengers on inbound ships to New South Wales arriving from well known hotspots for contagious diseases. Stories from the Sandstone examines around 1600 engravings in many different languages that were carved into the rocks and walls around the Quarantine Station during its 150 year history.

The book is beautifully illustrated with photographs of the engravings and paintings of the area. In addition to the inscriptions and graffiti, sources include official records, personal recollections, unpublished diaries, private correspondence, family trees and various archives. The authors draw from this rich body of sources to spotlight individuals who passed through the station and left their signatures in stone.

This fascinating and accomplished history of the Quarantine Station firmly locates the experiences of the local within the broader context of the global. It covers the history of immigration to Australia, the conditions of ship travel for men, women and children,the start of government public health measures and the establishment of official quarantine policies to manage arrivals and the spread of disease. It is a history contoured by how the governments of the day applied ideas of gender, race and culture to the treatment of diverse individuals. Such local experiences are set within the broader transnational framework of the history of trade, trade routes, theories of disease and pandemics"

Other prizes awarded include:
Australian History Prize ($15,000)From the Edge: Australia’s Lost Histories, Mark McKenna (Melbourne University Publishing)
General History Prize ($15,000)Japanese War Criminals: The Politics of Justice After the Second World War, Sandra Wilson, Robert Cribb, Beatrice Trefalt and Dean Aszkielowicz (Columbia University Press)
Young People’s History Prize ($15,000)Maralinga’s Long Shadow: Yvonne’s Story, Christobel Mattingley (Allen and Unwin)
Multimedia History Prize ($15,000)The Amboyna Conspiracy Trial, Adam Clulow (Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media)



Caitlin D'Gluyas

Following our first reading group event (with the theme of interpreting historical archaeology) in August, ASHA will host a casual/informal walking tour of Parramatta on Saturday, the 23rd September. This will be a chance to have a look around at some interpretive displays of historical archaeology. Perhaps some food for thought for the upcoming conference (don't forget to register for the conference by COB on Wednesday 20th September).

The walk will start at 2:30pm, meeting at the convict hut site on the corner of Marsden and Macquarie Streets. We'll be meeting on the steps out the front of the site. Final list of sites to visit to be confirmed, but please let us know if there is somewhere that you'd like to see. The tentative list includes: Bakers Mews-50 O’Connell Street, 25 Smith Street, 1 Parramatta Square.

On the same day, GML is also having an open day (another form of interpretation to talk about!) of the Parramatta RSL site, which can be booked through the RSL website. The last tour will be at 1:00pm, so you could book and attend that before the walking tour if you're interested. Book through the RSL reception: (02) 8865 5100. For more details: http://www.gml.com.au/lawn-bowl-thing-past/



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

Legislation in NSW that curbs the use of rail corridors for activites other than train use are changing, with a cycle and walking path to be installed between Rosewood and Turrumburra on an unused section of rail track. A single track line between Picton and Mittagong will be reinstated for use by heritage trains from the NSW Rail Museum, as well as a walking and cycling track alongside the same stretch the track.

For more information, see: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-08-22/picton-to-mittagong-return-of-the-age-of-steam/8781430



Caiti D'Gluyas, Helen Nicholson and Iain Stuart

Fancy catching up over a cleansing ale with fellow archaeologists? Or, perhaps you just wish to meet people you don’t know or may not have seen for a while? ASHA is looking to expand opportunities for networking and professional development and would appreciate your input and ideas.

‘Archaeology in the Pub’ is popular in the UK where a short talk is given followed by discussions. Interested? Then come along to the Shakespeare Hotel from 5.30 pm on Thursday 14 September. Enjoy free bar snacks and help us shape future Archaeology in the Pub and professional development events.

The Shakespeare Hotel is at 200 Devonshire Street in Surry Hills, just a few minutes walk from the Southern exit of Central Station.

It would be helpful (but not essential) if you could RSVP to secretary@asha.org.au.



AACAI NSW/ACT chapter

Archaeobotany for consultant archaeologists! AACAI NSW are pleased to present two speakers and a discussion on archaeobotanical sampling methods, techniques and controls for interpreting and dating archaeological sites, reconstructing past environments and understanding past Aboriginal and European land uses. Key speakers include: Dr Andrew Fairbain (University of Queensland) and Dr Emilie Dotte-Sarout (Australian National University). Attendees are invited to bring your questions for discussion!

Details

Thursday 21 September
Door opens 5:30pm for a 6:00pm start
The Big Dig Archaeology Education Centre at YHA the Rocks
Costs: AACAI Members and Students (must show student ID): Free
Non-Members: $10
Pay at the door

Please RSVP by 20 th September for catering purposes to dianacowie@gmail.com



CAA Australasia Spring Institute 2017 organising committee

The CAA Australasia Spring Institute on Digital Methods in Archaeology, to be held at the ANU's Kioloa Coastal Campus, is fast approaching. We have 5 places left and encourage any staff or graduate students with an interest in digital methods to take advantage of this opportunity to discuss issues, learn new skills, brainstorm ideas, find solutions and network with the CAA Australasia community.

All-in registration cost for the 5 day workshop, including accommodation, food and transport from Sydney or Canberra has been kept to $250, thanks to a generous subsidy. We also have student travel bursaries available to equalise airfare costs for interstate and NZ participants at $200 - see website for details: http://au.caa-international.org/spring-institute/

Feel free to contact James Flexner ( james.flexner@sydney.edu.au ) for more details, or sign up directly.

We hope to see you there!



Caiti D'Gluyas

The first ASHA reading group will be taking place this Thursday! Please RSVP to secretary@asha.org.au if you would like to attend.

ASHA is initiating a reading group for historical archaeologists in Sydney!

This is a semi-regular (quarterly) opportunity to catch-up with other historical archaeologists and discuss themes of interest. The venue, topic and facilitator will change with each event. There will be opportunities to start similar events in other places once we get going.

The first topic is 'Historical Archaeological Interpretation', in preparation for the upcoming conference, with Abi Cryerhall as this topic's facilitator. This event will be held on Thursday 24 August, 6pm, at GML Heritage (Level 6, 372 Elizabeth Street, Surry Hills).

Primary reading (please read this one as a priority):

McManamon, F, Archaeological Messages and Messengers in The Heritage Reader, Fairclough, G, 2008.

Additional readings:

Heritage Council of NSW, Heritage Information Series - Heritage Interpretation Policy.

Lewis, K, 2000, Imagination and Archaeological Interpretations: A Methodological Tale, Historical Archaeology, Vol. 34, No. 2, pp. 7-9.

Ireland, T, 2016, Up Close and Personal: Feeling the Past at Urban Archaeological Sites, Public History Review, Vol 23, pp. 43-55.

The event is free and open to anyone who is interested, however, RSVPs are essential (to secretary@asha.org.au). Please also get in touch if you are having difficulties sourcing the papers. Expressions of interest for the next venue, topic and facilitator are also welcome.



University of Sydney

The University of Sydney presents a lecture by Nathalie Cohen, Head of Community Archaeology at the Museum of London Archaeology: Knole Unlocked- The secret history of a country mansion. This lecture will take place on 17 August 2017, and the evening will include champagne and pies.

Knole is one of England's largest country houses and is owned by the National Trust. Over the last five years, a major program of conservation has been underway, supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund. This has involved repairs to the roofs and exterior, and extensive work within the showrooms, removing panelling and lifting floorboards to allow for repairs and new services. Archaeological investigation and recording of these previously unseen areas has greatly enhanced our understanding of this great house and this presentation will describe discoveries made during the course of this project.

Nathalie Cohen has worked on a number of different archaeological projects over the past 20 years, including: the Monuments at Risk Survey in the East Midlands, the Grimes London Archive Project and the Thames Archaeological Survey, and overseas at sites in Israel, the Czech Republic and Romania. She has also worked at the Museum of London Archaeology Service (now MOLA); as the Archivist for the unit, as a field archaeologist on excavations, and as a foreshore and built heritage specialist, on sites across Greater London, Kent, Buckinghamshire, Somerset, Devon and Surrey. She is currently an Honorary Research Associate at UCL, and also the Cathedral Archaeologist for Canterbury Cathedral.

Event details
6.00pm - 7.30pm Nicholson Museum The Quadrangle
Cost: $40, $30 for Friends of the Nicholson Museum and their Guests. $10 for Students.
RSVP: Please follow the link to register and pay online. http://bit.ly/nicholsonevents