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ASHA NEWS



Googong Township

Navin Officer Heritage Consultants (NOHC) archaeologists have begun work unearthing some of the Canberra region’s early European settlement - a lost nineteenth century schoolhouse in Googong. The dig is being run by Googong Township Pty Ltd in partnership with NOHC and is part of the extensive environmental and heritage survey works being undertaken at Googong. NOHC project Excavation Director and ANU archaeology graduate Dr Rebecca Parkes said the school was a missing piece of local history.

“The school operated into the 20th century but there are very few historical records for it and nobody could remember where it was, so it was lost. We’re hoping the project gives us a nice window into rural life in that period, as there has been very little archaeological evidence found from that period in this area before.”

People are invited to view the archaeological site. Spots are strictly limited and must be booked in advance.

All visitors must wear enclosed flat shoes and be able to comfortably walk along a gently undulating farm trail for approx 800m-1km from the meeting spot to the site (10 minute walk), where they will receive a talk and tour of the site of approximately 30 minutes before returning to their cars. The event is subject to weather. Children must be under the care of a responsible adult at all times.

What:  Archaeological site visit of Googong's first school c.1880's.

When: Saturday 24 June 2017. Session times are strictly 10am, 11am, 12pm and 1pm. A max of 20 people can be booked in each session. Sessions are one hour each.

Registrations: Bookings are strictly limited and may be made via email to enquiries@googong.net. Please be sure to include your preferred session time, your full name and mobile number, and the full names of individuals in your party. We will confirm your booking via email and include details of where to meet.



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

The Broken Hill City Council are taking steps to discover if the city is able to be added to the World Heritage Register, following it being recently added to the National Heritage Register in 2015. Through the potential listing, the Council aims to diversify the economy in the area, by increasing tourism and tackling the population decline that it is currently experiencing.

For more information, please see the following links:
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-06-12/push-to-get-broken-hill-on-world-heritage-city-list/8610180?platform=hootsuite


http://www.environment.gov.au/cgi-bin/ahdb/search.pl?mode=place_detail;place_id=105861


Image: Broken Hill Town Hall, sourced from the National Heritage Listing website, as above.



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

A 19th century school house has been excavated as part of developments in Googong, NSW. The excavation involved consultant and ANU student archaeologists, and recieved visits from local school children. Artefacts including slate pencils were found among the foundations.

For more information, please see the following links:

http://www.theage.com.au/act-news/anu-archaeologists-unearth-19th-century-history-at-googong-20170605-gwkgqy.html

http://www.archaeology.org/news/5605-170605-australia-school-house



ICOFORT and Australia ICOMOS

ICOFORT – the International Scientific Committee on Fortifications and Military Heritage – was formed by ICOMOS in 2005 and was established to engage with the heritage conservation issues related to structures, landscapes and monuments associated with military heritage. There is now an Australia ICOMOS National Scientific Committee on Fortifications and Military Heritage. This talk by Dr Matthew Kelly is designed to introduce members to some aspects of military heritage around the world and in Australia and to also announce the development of the National Scientific Committee focusing on Australian military and conflict heritage. This introductory talk will also hopefully encourage ICOMOS members to consider joining this new National Scientific Committee and engage with the issues related to managing this form of heritage in a modern world. The talk will be preceded by a free tour of the Dawes Point Battery, with Denis Gojak.

Thursday 15 June 2017

Tour: Dawes Point under the Sydney Harbour Bridge south side starts at 5:15pm for 5.30pm sharp directed by Denis Gojak regarding the Dawes Point Battery.

Talk: The Big Dig, The Rocks, 110 Cumberland St, Sydney NSW 2000 at 6:15pm for 6:30pm sharp after the tour.

Students $5, Members $10, Non-members $15 all payable at the Big Dig in cash.

RSVP: via email to Louise Cox thubbul@bigpond.com. Bookings are essential as places are limited.

For more information, please see the following link: docomomoaustralia.com.au



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff =

Members in New South Wales and beyond may be interested in the following article which discusses the upcoming sale of the Heritage Listed Sydney GPO, which was opened in 1874, by Australia Post. For more information, please see the following link:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-06-01/historic-sydney-building-being-sold-despite-heritage-concerns/8578782?platform=hootsuite

Image: Powerhouse Museum "General Post Office, Sydney" https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3851259



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

The Hyde Parks Barracks website has recently been rediscovered, and has been suggested as a "blast from the past" for the blog. The website includes various images of excavations from the 1980's, which you can check out here:https://sydneylivingmuseums.com.au/stories/archaeology-action-hyde-park-barracks

An excerpt from the page states:

In 1979 a major restoration of Hyde Park Barracks was begun, and by September 1980 the Barracks became the subject of the first publicly-funded archaeological excavation in New South Wales. Test trenches were opened by archaeologist Wendy Thorp, and then for 14 weeks throughout 1981 the site was under excavation by a team of 11 archaeologists, a conservator, a photographer and 250 volunteers, led by archaeologist Patricia Burritt.

...

During these excavations archaeologists discovered over 120,000 artefacts around the site, including over 80,000 recovered from beneath the floors of the upper levels of the dormitory building, where objects had been trapped for up to 160 years. An estimated 80 per cent were left behind by women of the Female Immigration Depot, the Hyde Park Asylum for aged and destitute women and courts and government offices, and the remaining 20 per cent survived the installation of new ceilings in 1848, and date from the convict period.



AACAI NSW/ACT Chapter

The AACAI NSW/ACT Chapter invites you to a wine and cheese chat on 'Digital Archaeology'. The speakers will be Dr James Flexner and Diana Cowie. The event will be held on Thursday 9th June, 6:00pm at the Big Dig Centre, in The Rocks YHA, Sydney. The event is free for AACAI Members, $10 for Non-members and Students

GML Heritage

At the recent NSW National Trust Heritage awards, GML Heritage won the award for Interpretation for their Hill End Historic Site project.

Hill End Historic Site is a former gold mining town in the central west of New South Wales. The National Parks and Wildlife Service commissioned GML, with Trigger and Simon MacArthur Associates to prepare an interpretation plan to increase visitor ‘access’ to the stories, sensory qualities and character of the site.

The interpretation plan focused on revitalisation and reimagining the presentation of Hill End. It not only defined themes and heritage values, but also addressed the wider business revitalisation of the site in a holistic way, identifying revenue generation, combined with visitor and marketing opportunities to assist conservation of the place and its collections.

Innovative tourism opportunities were identified with the aim of strengthening and diversifying the visitor experience, increasing sustainability and supporting local businesses and new social entrepreneurs. The project team generated a range of engaging options and interpretive programs to address the different needs and interests of visitors. A key aim was to create an authentic visitor experience that fostered creative enterprise to engage with artisans, crafts people and other businesses that aligned with the character and identity of Hill End.

Clarifying the site’s carrying capacity and identifying ways to improve on-site visitor management, GML also market-tested interpretive initiatives and prepared costings to ensure value for money, reduce risk and maximise successful implementation.

For more information, please see the following links:
https://www.nationaltrust.org.au/education-and-interpretation-alchemy-hill-end/
http://www.gml.com.au/gml-wins-at-2017-nsw-national-trust-heritage-awards/

Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

Excavations continue at various sites across Parramatta, as part of UrbanGrowth NSW’s Parramatta North Urban Transformation Program. The program aims to conserve and better understand the area's heritage and will continue late into 2017. Sites include Aboriginal settlement areas, the Parramatta Female Factory and the Roman Catholic Orphan School. Excavations have so far uncovered knapping sites, children's toys, clerical items and a clay tobacco pipe dated from between 1847-1870.

For more information, please see the following article at:

http://www.urbangrowth.nsw.gov.au/newsroom/archaeological-digs-uncover-fascinating-finds-at-parramatta-north/             



 




Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

Judy Birmingham, prominent archaeologist, has been awarded a Lifetime Achievement Heritage Award from the NSW National Trust for her various contributions to the discipline, including her teaching role at University of Sydney and co-writing the conservation guidelines for the NSW Department of Planning.


For more about Judy Birmingham, her various acheivments, and other Heritage Awardees see the following links:

https://www.nationaltrust.org.au/heritage-awards-nsw/
https://www.nationaltrust.org.au/heritage-awards-2017-winners/
http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/