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ASHA NEWS



Dr Jennifer Rodrigues

Call for papers: People and the sea: current research on maritime interactions between Southeast Asia and the wider world

Session Chairs:
Dr Jennifer Rodrigues, Western Australian Museum (Jennifer.Rodrigues@museum.wa.gov.au)
Ms Abhirada Pook Komoot, University of Western Australia (abhirada.komoot@research.uwa.edu.au)

The interconnections of two major Oceans—the Indian and Pacific Oceans—have dominated Southeast Asian maritime heritage for thousands of years, enabling movement of, and interaction between, people, ideas and goods. Confirmation of the relationship between Southeast Asia with other regions is evidenced in the dispersal of Austronesian languages, spoken widely in Southeast Asia. Due to the sea providing travel routes to distant regions of the Pacific and Indian Oceans, the expansion of the languages suggests that people from Southeast Asia migrated to both sides—eastward to Oceania and Africa to the west. Furthermore, influences of maritime activities have spread beyond ports and maritime settlements. Research has revealed that mainland Southeast Asia including Myanmar, Thailand, Lao PDR, Cambodia and Vietnam also benefited from nautical skills through their complex riverine networks. Material traces from the hinterland and along coastal rims of both oceans, show that Southeast Asia has long been a dynamic region with an intense mix of cultures in its geographical crossroads. In ancient times, Southeast Asia was the only maritime gateway to China from the west. Research on maritime history in Southeast Asia, therefore, is crucial in defining the foundations of modern economic patterns.

This session welcomes researchers and young scholars from a wide range of fields and disciplines to share their work on Southeast Asia’s maritime past. It aims to gain, and discuss, new insight into the maritime history of the region’s connections with the wider world. Papers may include, but are not limited to, studies in material culture, traditional practices, and awareness-raising programmes through preservation and interpretation of the archaeological resources. Raising public awareness of the importance and potential of our maritime heritage can enrich our understanding of the past, and help forge cooperation and common ground for preserving and appreciating our shared heritage.

IPPA: Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association

Please send presentation abstract proposals (approx. 250 words) to both Session Chairs by end January 2018.



ASHA Blog Editor

Welcome to 2018 and a new year of the ASHA News blog! We at ASHA hope that you have had a relaxing holiday break and are looking forward to an exciting new year.

Here at the ASHA Blog, we will be continuing to provide our members and other interested parties with information about what is going on in the world of historical archaeology in Australia, New Zealand and the wider Pacific region. This means more posts about research, excavations, upcoming events and Artefacts of the Month!

You can sign up to the RSS feed, found on the left side of the blog, in order to receive an email update each time a new blog post hits the site. And remember: as part of the ASHA membership, you also receive a quarterly blog summary email, so sign up as a member HERE.

We are very proud to say that over the last year the blog has gained many viewers. Previous to the revamp in January 2017 the blog averaged 175 views per month. By the second half of 2017 the ASHA News blog  was averaging of 1,200 views per month! This year we are looking to recieve more submissions from historical archaeologists all over Australasia, so if you'd like some free exposure for your excavation or research, if you've got an upcoming event you'd like to advertise, or if you simply want to show off that wonderfully interesting artefact you've excavated please send an email to blog@asha.org.au or to your local regional representitive (whose email addresses can be found HERE).

We're excited to see what happens in Australasian Historical Archaeology in 2018, thanks for joining us!



Bronwyn Woff, ASHA Blog Editor

Welcome to the final Artefact of the Month (AotM) post for 2017! I hope that you have enjoyed reading the articles put together by our members about interesting artefacts they’ve come across.

We started AotM in February, with ‘Absinthe Bottles at Little Lon’ by Dr Sarah Hayes, and followed with two more articles on glass in March and April – ‘Bullseye! Pontilled Window Glass’ by Bronwyn Woff and ‘Kirin Beer Bottle’ by Melissa Dunk. In May Catherine Tucker shared with us an engraved fork excavated from a Pentridge Prison rubbish tip. In June we headed across the ditch to check out a variety of ceramics excavated from Christchurch in an article by Jessie Garland. 'French Fire Bricks' were our next Artefact of the Month article, with the first of three articles for the year by Felicity Buckingham and Zvonka Stanin. In August Fiona Shanahan showed how artefacts can provide us with proof of once-off events, with the camera lens of a F-52 photoreconnaissance camera used in WWII. In September we continued the aeroplane-related theme, with Miss Australia Air League Badges from the 1950s by Felicity Buckingham. Our ASHA Secretary Caiti D’Gluyas provided us with an interesting look at ‘The Hated Stain’ of convictism through a medal commemorating the Cessation of Convict Transportation in October and we rounded off the year with a final AotM article by Zvonka Stanin demonstrating the fashion of men’s Broad Fall Trousers.

Thanks go out to the authors of each of our submissions for 2017. We are currently looking for Artefact of the Month articles for 2018, so if you have an artefact that you’re interested in writing about (or just want to show it off to fellow archaeologists!) then please email blog@asha.org.au



Helen Ross FEIANZ, AJEM Editor

A major part of Australian and New Zealand identity is made up of our spirit and ingenuity, our heritage places, and our unique living landscapes. Heritage is a legacy from our past, a living, integral part of life today, and the stories and places we pass on to future generations.

The EIANZ has recently established a Heritage Special Interest Section. Its aim is to develop and promote knowledge about heritage as an essential element of the environment as well as to improve professional practice and recognition of heritage practitioners.

To further these aims, we are seeking to compile the first heritage special issue of the EIANZ journal, the Australasian Journal of Environmental Management (AJEM). The focus of the AJEM is on policy and practice, and we welcome submissions of abstracts on any aspect of these themes. Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:
* Is policy and practice in Australia and New Zealand effectively protecting heritage?
* Are our heritage practices adequate to interpret and conserve the past, to help us understand our environment, and to pass that legacy on to the future?
* Engagement of stakeholders in heritage
* Case studies of successful collaborative projects where heritage has been integrated with other environmental practice
* How would effective policy for Intangible heritage and heritage landscapes look?
* Multiple uses for heritage
* What is heritage anyway?

Submission Process:
Papers will be reviewed following the AJEM double‐blind review process. Expressions of interest to publish, along with an abstract, should be submitted to the guest editors, Richard Sharp FEIANZ CEnvP and Vanessa Hardy MEIANZ M.ICOMOS by 20 February 2018. Following acceptance of the EOI and abstract, full papers should be submitted by 30 August 2018 by online submission to the Australasian Journal of Environmental Management Scholar One Manuscripts. Papers should be prepared using the AJEM Guidelines. The guest editors welcome informal enquiries related to the proposed topics.



Chinese-Australian Hometown Heritage Tour

Do you have a Cantonese ancestor but have never been to China? Do you want to know more about your Cantonese roots but don't know where to start? Are you interested in learning more about overseas Chinese culture and heritage?

You might be interested in the upcoming Chinese Australian Hometown Heritage Tour to Guangdong, China.

For more information, check out this link: www.katebagnall.com/projects/hometown-heritage-tour/



UCL Press

UCL Press is delighted to announce a brand new open access textbook that may be of interest to list subscribers: Key Concepts in Public Archaeology. The book can be downloaded for free as a PDF and app, read online for free, and purchased in paperback and hardback.

Free PDF download/app/enhanced online edition HERE

This book provides a broad overview of the key concepts in public archaeology, a research field that examines the relationship between archaeology and the public, in both theoretical and practical terms. While based on the long-standing programme of undergraduate and graduate teaching in public archaeology at UCL’s Institute of Archaeology, the book also takes into account the growth of scholarship from around the world and seeks to clarify what exactly ‘public archaeology’ is by promoting an inclusive, socially and politically engaged vision of the discipline.

Written for students and practitioners, the individual chapters provide textbook-level introductions to the themes, theories and controversies that connect archaeology to wider society, from the trade in illicit antiquities to the use of digital media in public engagement, and point readers to the most relevant case studies and learning resources to aid their further study.



Sarah Hayes

ASHA’s Twitter account needs you! We are looking for a small group of committed Twitter users to run the ASHA Twitter account. Ideally we would like to have people from different cities and regions to promote local events and ASHA happenings to the ASHA community. Plus of course find and share interesting news stories!

If you are a regular Twitter user and would like to help out please find me on Twitter @SarahHResearch or send me an email at s.hayes@latrobe.edu.au  And if you aren’t following already, find us on Twitter @ASHA_inc



Bronwyn Woff

Heritage New Zealand and Spokes Canterbury (cycling advocacy group based in Christchurch) are holding a guided cycling tour around Christchurch City. The tour will take place on 15th October, 10am to 11.30am and 2pm to 3.30pm. The guided cycling tour is free, but bookings are required:  https://ccc.govt.nz/news-and-events/events/show/12   Self-guided tour brochures are also available from Heritage New Zealand.



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

During a three day meeting, the Canterbury Synod has made the decision to restore the Christchurch Cathedral which was damaged during the 2011 earthquakes. The NZ Government and Christchurch City Council offered $35 million and fast-tracked legislation if restoration was the option chosen. The Cathedral is a Category 1 listed building under Heritage New Zealand, being of regional, national and international significance. Bishop Victoria Matthews felt that the Cathedral would be restored within 10 years.

For more information, see the following news article: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11920249

Image by By New Zealand Defence Force showing the Cathedral the day after the earthquake https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=13698444



Auckland Heritage

The Auckland Heritage Festival is on from 30 September to 15 October. This spring, hit the streets and waterways to discover the stories and secretes of Auckland's heritage! For more details, including details about upcoming walks,, talks, workshops, exhibitions and entertainment, please see: http://www.heritagefestival.co.nz/