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ASHA NEWS



UCL Press

UCL Press is delighted to announce a brand new open access textbook that may be of interest to list subscribers: Key Concepts in Public Archaeology. The book can be downloaded for free as a PDF and app, read online for free, and purchased in paperback and hardback.

Free PDF download/app/enhanced online edition HERE

This book provides a broad overview of the key concepts in public archaeology, a research field that examines the relationship between archaeology and the public, in both theoretical and practical terms. While based on the long-standing programme of undergraduate and graduate teaching in public archaeology at UCL’s Institute of Archaeology, the book also takes into account the growth of scholarship from around the world and seeks to clarify what exactly ‘public archaeology’ is by promoting an inclusive, socially and politically engaged vision of the discipline.

Written for students and practitioners, the individual chapters provide textbook-level introductions to the themes, theories and controversies that connect archaeology to wider society, from the trade in illicit antiquities to the use of digital media in public engagement, and point readers to the most relevant case studies and learning resources to aid their further study.



State Library of New South Wales

The winners of The 2017 NSW Premier’s History Awards, were recently announced at the State Library of NSW, as part of the official launch of NSW History Week. Archaeologists Anne Clarke, Ursula Frederick and historian Peter Hobbins were awarded the NSW Community and Regional History Prize for their publication "Stories from the Sandstone: Quarantine Inscriptions from Australia’s Immigrant Past".


Anne Clarke, Ursula Frederick and Peter Hobbins

Judges of the award stated:
"The North Head Quarantine Station operated from the 1830s until it closed in 1984; it served as a holding station for passengers on inbound ships to New South Wales arriving from well known hotspots for contagious diseases. Stories from the Sandstone examines around 1600 engravings in many different languages that were carved into the rocks and walls around the Quarantine Station during its 150 year history.

The book is beautifully illustrated with photographs of the engravings and paintings of the area. In addition to the inscriptions and graffiti, sources include official records, personal recollections, unpublished diaries, private correspondence, family trees and various archives. The authors draw from this rich body of sources to spotlight individuals who passed through the station and left their signatures in stone.

This fascinating and accomplished history of the Quarantine Station firmly locates the experiences of the local within the broader context of the global. It covers the history of immigration to Australia, the conditions of ship travel for men, women and children,the start of government public health measures and the establishment of official quarantine policies to manage arrivals and the spread of disease. It is a history contoured by how the governments of the day applied ideas of gender, race and culture to the treatment of diverse individuals. Such local experiences are set within the broader transnational framework of the history of trade, trade routes, theories of disease and pandemics"

Other prizes awarded include:
Australian History Prize ($15,000)From the Edge: Australia’s Lost Histories, Mark McKenna (Melbourne University Publishing)
General History Prize ($15,000)Japanese War Criminals: The Politics of Justice After the Second World War, Sandra Wilson, Robert Cribb, Beatrice Trefalt and Dean Aszkielowicz (Columbia University Press)
Young People’s History Prize ($15,000)Maralinga’s Long Shadow: Yvonne’s Story, Christobel Mattingley (Allen and Unwin)
Multimedia History Prize ($15,000)The Amboyna Conspiracy Trial, Adam Clulow (Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media)



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

Excavations 25 graves, which uncovered the remains of 27 individuals, has recently been completed at Milton cemetery in the south of New Zealands's South Island. The excavations are part of research being conducted in partnership with Tokomaririro Project 60 (TP60) and the Anglican Church. The research will look into the lives of the first settlers to the area - where they came from, what hardships they endured in life, and which current members of the town formerly known as Tokomairiro or Tokomairaro are related to them.

For more information, please see: https://www.newsroom.co.nz/2017/08/16/42910/how-tough-was-life-in-colonial-new-zealand



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

The following research article highlights the parallels between the throw-away society of Gold Rush Victoria and of people today, showing our wasteful culture is firmly entrenched in our collective past.

Check it out here: https://theconversation.com/gold-rush-victoria-was-as-wasteful-as-we-are-today-78473



University of Sydney

The University of Sydney presents a lecture by Nathalie Cohen, Head of Community Archaeology at the Museum of London Archaeology: Knole Unlocked- The secret history of a country mansion. This lecture will take place on 17 August 2017, and the evening will include champagne and pies.

Knole is one of England's largest country houses and is owned by the National Trust. Over the last five years, a major program of conservation has been underway, supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund. This has involved repairs to the roofs and exterior, and extensive work within the showrooms, removing panelling and lifting floorboards to allow for repairs and new services. Archaeological investigation and recording of these previously unseen areas has greatly enhanced our understanding of this great house and this presentation will describe discoveries made during the course of this project.

Nathalie Cohen has worked on a number of different archaeological projects over the past 20 years, including: the Monuments at Risk Survey in the East Midlands, the Grimes London Archive Project and the Thames Archaeological Survey, and overseas at sites in Israel, the Czech Republic and Romania. She has also worked at the Museum of London Archaeology Service (now MOLA); as the Archivist for the unit, as a field archaeologist on excavations, and as a foreshore and built heritage specialist, on sites across Greater London, Kent, Buckinghamshire, Somerset, Devon and Surrey. She is currently an Honorary Research Associate at UCL, and also the Cathedral Archaeologist for Canterbury Cathedral.

Event details
6.00pm - 7.30pm Nicholson Museum The Quadrangle
Cost: $40, $30 for Friends of the Nicholson Museum and their Guests. $10 for Students.
RSVP: Please follow the link to register and pay online. http://bit.ly/nicholsonevents

NASC Australia Committee

This year at NASC 2017 we are taking abstract submissions of 250 words for three categories, they are as follows:

Research Presentations:
  • A presentation of any original archaeological research conducted by or partly by the speaker. This could be research at any level of study (Honours, Masters, PhD etc). All types of research will be considered. Time limits will be announced closer to the date of the conference.
Excavation presentations:
  • A presentation of 5 minutes with 2 minutes of question time. The presentation is to cover details of an excavation which the speaker took part in. All types of excavation will be considered with the aim to give students the opportunity to hear about excavations happening globally. Speakers are advised to discuss their experiences, how they became involved in the excavation and any tips they have for people participating in an excavation.
Poster submissions:
  • A poster discussing any original work undertaken by or partly by the person submitting the poster. There is a size limit of 841 x 1189 mm (A0 size).
  • Poster submissions may be by individuals or as a group.

If you would like to present in one or more categories please fill out the form at: https://www.nascaustralia.com/abstracts/

Submissions for abstracts close on 1st August 2017



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

A story long believed to be false by researchers in convict history may have been proved true by an amature historian. The English teacher who is based in Japan, along with a volunteer manuscript reading group translated a c1830s description of the arrival of ship Cyprus to the Japanese coast. The crew were a group of convicts who had hijacked the brig as it was on it's way from Hobart to Macquarie Harbour in 1829. Together, they traveled as far as China, with their journey being recorded in later documents from their trail for piracy.

For more information, please see the following link:
https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2017/may/28/australian-convict-pirates-in-japan-evidence-of-1830-voyage-unearthed?platform=hootsuite



Centre for Creative and Cultural Research, University of Canberra, compiled by Richard Morrison

The (ir)replaceable symposium - a discussion about heritage, conservation and future-making - will discuss what happens when conservation is envisioned as future-making rather than preservation. The symposium will be held in the Ann Harding Centre at the University of Canberra at 12.00-5.30pm, on Wednesday 21 June 2017, with a networking drinks event to follow. Questions to be explored include:

Is the past irreplaceable and non-renewable or renewed and remade through heritage conservation?

What can we learn from reflecting on the history of heritage conservation?

How have our current heritage practices and policies contributed to building a more just and sustainable society?

What future risks and opportunities can be influenced by our policies and practices in the present?

The convenors, Tracy Ireland (University of Canberra) and Steve Brown (University of Sydney) - ACHS Aus/NZ Chapter Coordinators - in conjunction with Denis Byrne (Western Sydney University), welcome further ‘provocations’ on these topics, broadly interpreted, to ‘build a constructive, collaborative agenda’ for the Australian and New Zealand Chapter of the ACHS, in the lead up to the 2018 Heritage Across Borders Conference in Hangzhou, China. A full programme will be disseminated in early June. For further information, including speakers and online registration, please see the following link.

https://www.canberra.edu.au/research/faculty-research-centres/cccr/events/irreplaceable

Fenella Atkinson

AACAI is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2017 Student Support Fund:

  • Lauren Churchill (University of Sydney) Foodways in regional New South Wales in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries: A study of butchery patterns
  • Rodina Goranitis (University of Queensland) Doing it right: Best practice standards in cultural heritage management
  • Rebekah Hawkins (University of Sydney) Exploring the relationship between raw material and morphology in a lithic assemblage from Lake George NSW: A close look at backed artefacts and core production and their connection to raw material
  • Jacinta Koolmatrie (Flinders University) Adnyamathanha Yura Malka
  • Liam Norris (Australian National University) The Aboriginal history of Ulladulla

On completion, summaries of the projects will be published in the AACAI E-News, and papers in the AACAI Journal.

We would like to acknowledge the generous support of the sponsors of the 2017 Fund:

  • Archae-aus
  • Comber Consultants
  • Everick Heritage Consultants
  • Extent Heritage
  • North Qld Cultural Heritage
  • Ochre Imprints
  • Wallis Heritage Consulting

Thank you very much to all the applicants, and best wishes with your studies.

Caroline Spry

As part of La Trobe University's 50th Anniversary celebrations, you are warmly invited to ‘Looking back, looking forward for La Trobe Archaeology.' This day-long event will bring together students, staff, alumni and others over four sessions to connect past and present members, showcase La Trobe Archaeology’s research and capabilities, and build pathways for future work opportunities and research-industry collaborations.

The first session will be a panel discussion on career pathways by alumni. The second will include discussion and demonstration of La Trobe Archaeology’s research capabilities and cutting-edge technologies, and how they can facilitate research-industry collaborations. The third session will comprise a conversation with Emeritus Professor David Frankel, Emeritus Professor Jim Allen and Professor Susan Lawrence. In the final session, past and present members and others will have the opportunity to meet and reconnect over light refreshments.

At the conclusion of the day, an informal dinner will be held at The Eagle bar, La Trobe University.

Date: Friday 19th May 2017 (National Archaeology Week 2017)
Time: 9am-5pm
Venue: West Lecture Theatre 2, La Trobe University (Bundoora campus)

Please note that the day event is free, but registration is essential viahttps://latrobe.onestopsecure.com/onestopweb/LTUEv/tran?tran-type=7145

Session 1: Alumni reflections on working in archaeology and cultural heritage management
This session will comprise a panel of alumni from La Trobe Archaeology who will offer their experiences and insights on building a career and working in different spheres of archaeology and cultural heritage, from undergraduate studies to government agencies, archaeological consulting companies, museums, universities, heritage councils, international scientific advisory bodies and beyond.

Session 2: La Trobe Archaeology now – building research-industry collaborations
This session will showcase La Trobe Archaeology’s research capabilities, and discuss how cutting-edge technologies at La Trobe Archaeology can encourage detailed, multifaceted and collaborative approaches to investigating, visualising and preserving our past.

Session 3: A conversation with Emeritus Professor David Frankel, Emeritus Professor Jim Allen and Professor Susan Lawrence
This conversation with Emeritus Professor David Frankel, Emeritus Professor Jim Allen and Professor Susan Lawrence will focus on past, present and future directions of La Trobe Archaeology, and the challenges and opportunities that face students, researchers and professionals in archaeology and cultural heritage management.

Session 4: Looking forward – developing work opportunities and collaborations
The final session provides the opportunity for students, staff, alumni and others to meet, reconnect and create work opportunities and collaborations over light refreshments. Professionals and researchers working in different areas of archaeology and cultural heritage management will also be available for one-on-one discussions about graduate opportunities and research projects.

We would also like to ask if you would like to share any photographs for use in a slideshow at the event, which will be reflecting on students and their experiences at La Trobe, both past and present.