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ASHA NEWS


AACAI NSW/ACT
AACAI NSW are pleased to present the Sydney Historical Archaeology Practitioner’s Workshop (SHAP) as part of National Archaeology Week 2017. The one day workshop is an opportunity for practitioners, students and those interested in historical archaeology to explore best practice, innovations and technology as well as recent historical archaeology projects in NSW. While we have received a number of presentation proposals already, we would like to offer everyone the opportunity to submit an abstract for a short presentation (10 -15min). A theme in several heritage conferences in Australia this year is ‘interpretation’. In keeping this thread going and to offer some inspiration for papers, we are using the theme ‘views and interpretations-historical archaeology in NSW.' The day will include keynote speakers, papers, practical demonstrations and discussions all related to current practice in historical archaeology. Tickets will be released shortly for booking a seat to attend the day hosted at the Big Dig Centre, The Rocks, Sydney.


In submitting a presentation or other session (discussion/ demonstration) proposal please submit t00he following:
a title for your presentation;
an abstract of 150 to 400 words;
presenter’s name (including prenominal –Dr/ Ms/ Mr etc)and company/affiliation
a sentence or two demonstrating the link between your presentation and our theme (if relevant)
and whether you would be interested in your presentation being published in the form of a paper in a journal or publication arising from the workshop

Send submissions by 5.00pm Fri 15 March to the NSW/ACT AACAI Secretary: dianacowie@gmail.com

Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

 
The Melbourne Free University is running a series of lectures entitled "History Matters". The lectures run from 6.30 - 8.00pm at The Alderman in Brunswick East.

Upcoming lectures include:
16 March - Susan Lawrence - Liquid gold: How controlling water made Victoria's miners rich
23 March - Nadia Rhook - Speaking in grids: the order of language from slums to Marvellous Melbourne
30 March - Katie Holmes - History of ANZAC
6 April - Liz Conor - Graphic distortions: The comic misadventures of cartoonist Eric Jolliffe's Whitchetty's Tribe (as read against 18C and other Whiteman Hissyfits)

 

For more information, please see the following link: http://www.melbournefreeuniversity.org/courses/history-matters/



University of New England

A lecture presented by Richard Tuffin and David Roe, entitled 'But did they wash behind their ears?: preliminary findings from the 2016 Penitentiary Ablutions archaeological excavation at Port Arthur' will be presented on Wednesday 15 March, at 4.00pm. The lecture will be held at the University of New England (Large Lecture Theatre EM1, Natural Resources Building (W55)) and will also be available via a recording on the Archaeology Society’s Echo 360 page (see link below).

During early 2016, a team of archaeologists undertook a programme of excavation within the ablutions area of the Penitentiary, Port Arthur Historic Site, Tasmania. From 1856–1877, the area housed the amenities blocks, exercise yards, shelter sheds and Day Room and is a vital key to understanding how Port Arthur’s most iconic structure operated as a place of incarceration. The archaeological excavation, part of a suite of ongoing conservation, interpretation and research works, was by far the largest ever carried out at the site and one of the largest research investigations of the convict-period undertaken in Australia. A team of seven professional archaeologists spent over four months on site, their findings already beginning to challenge existing views of how convicts and the authorities interacted with the space and with each other.

"This presentation will share the early results of the excavation, showcasing some of the more fascinating finds. The advanced recording methods used to conduct the investigation will also be discussed, including the generation of highly detailed 3D representations of the site using photogrammetric techniques.

Richard Tuffin served an initial term as an archaeologist at Port Arthur between 2001 and 2007. In an unintentional reversal of 19th century norms, Richard transported himself to Scotland, where he worked at the coal face of commercial archaeology. He gladly took up the offer of Penitentiary Project archaeologist in 2015. Dr David Roe is Archaeology Manager with the Port Arthur Historic Site Management Authority and has been involved with archaeological management and research in the UK, Portugal, Russia, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, Pitcairn Island and Australia. They are both part of the UNE/ UTAS/PAHMSA Australian Research Council 'Landscapes of Punishment and Production' project with Prof. Martin Gibbs and A. Prof David Roberts of UNE.

For people off-campus, the presentation will be recorded and made available through the Archaeology Society’s Echo 360 page HERE.

Gretel Boswijk

This might be on the cusp (in terms of NZ timing) of what is considered Historical Archaeology, but ASHA readers may be interested in this new publication on using high resolution wigglematch radiocarbon dating. Palisade posts from a Waikato pa and construction were investigated, and were dated at 1768+-4 (95% probability). Article information and a link to the article can be found below.

Hogg, A., Gumbley, W., Boswijk, G., Petchey, F., Southon, J, Anderson, A., Roa, T., Donaldson, L. 2017. The first accurate and precise calendar dating of New Zealand Maori Pa, using Otahau Pa as a case study. Journal of Archaeological Science Reports 12, 124-133.

The article can be found at: https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1UTMg,rVDBGCvC

Ian Evans

Tasmanian Evil-averting Marks

The Tasmanian Magic Project has released a video which aims to enlist the aid of the general public in finding evil-averting marks. It’s hoped the video will raise awareness of the existence of these marks on old houses and buildings and so aid in the re-discovery of the lost and secret history of magic in 19th-century Australia.

Several marks are illustrated and it is hoped that further marks and new reports of known marks will be passed to the Magic Project as a result of the video. People who watch the video are encouraged to get in touch if they have seen any magic marks. The video was produced by Ruth Hazleton, folklore researcher and musician of Melbourne.

The video can be seen here: https://youtu.be/tMmaWwrAXHY.

Issued by the Tasmanian Magic Project
PO Box 591
Mullumbimby NSW 2482
Phone 0455 173 456
Email evansthebook@gmail.com

School of Archaeology & Anthropology, ANU College of Arts and the Social Sciences, compiled by Richard Morrison

Triabunna Field School, Tasmania

As reported previously this 2nd field work season was to be undertaken by Dr Ash Lenton, ANU, for undergraduates from there but also from the University of Sydney, in January and February 2017. It was to focus on the investigation of a military barracks which serviced the adjacent Maria Island convict settlement in the 1840’s.

A news report on the project can be found here
For more information see also:
http://sydney.edu.au/news-opinion/news/2017/01/23/student-dig-explores-tasmanian-barracks-of-colonial-regiment.html

https://m.facebook.com/TriabunnaBarracksANU.Dig/

Twitter #TriabunnaBarracks
Originally posted on the ANMM website

The Australian National Maritime Museum, with the Australian Association for Maritime History have opened nominations for two maritime history prizes.

The major prize is named in honour of the late Professor Frank Broeze (1945–2001) of the University of Western Australia, who has been called the pre-eminent maritime historian of his generation. Professor Broeze was a founding member of the Australian Association for Maritime History, inaugural editor of its scholarly journal The Great Circle, and introduced Australia’s first university course on maritime history. He was the author of many works on Australian maritime history, including the landmark Island Nation (1997), helping to redefine the field in broader terms tan ships, sailors and sea power. He reached into economic, business, social and urban histories to make maritime history truly multidisciplinary.

The 2017 Frank Broeze Memorial Maritime History Prize of $4,000
To be awarded for a book treating any aspect of maritime history relating to or affecting Australia, written or co-authored by an Australian citizen or permanent resident, and published between 1 January 2015 and 31 December 2016. The book should be published in Australia, although titles written by Australian authors but published overseas may be considered at the discretion of the judges. The prize is open to Australian authors or co-authors of a book-length monograph or compilation of their own works. Edited collections of essays by multiple contributors are not eligible.

The Australian Community Maritime History Prize of $1,000
To be awarded to a regional or local museum or historical society for a publication (book, booklet, educational resource kit, DVD or other media) relating to an aspect of maritime history of that region or community, and published between 1 January 2015 and 31 December 2016. The winner will also receive a year’s subscription to the Australian Association for Maritime History.

For instructions on how to nominate and information on the judging process, please see:
http://www.anmm.gov.au/get-involved/grants-and-awards/history-prizes
Bronwyn Woff

Excavations have recently concluded at Triabunna, which is situated on Tasmania's east coast near Maria Island. The excavations were carried out as part of a joint ANU and University of Sydney field school. Students participated in the excavations around what are believed to be military barracks.

For more information, please see the following:
https://www.facebook.com/TriabunnaBarracks.Dig/
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-01-18/triabunna-archaeological-dig-unearthing-untold-stories/8191066

A four-part radio series was produced by ABC Hobart centering on Triabunna and the excavations findings:
https://soundcloud.com/936-abc-hobart/digging-up-triabunnas-past-part-1
https://soundcloud.com/936-abc-hobart/digging-up-triabunnas-past-part-2
https://soundcloud.com/936-abc-hobart/learning-in-a-trench-in-triabunna
https://soundcloud.com/936-abc-hobart/what-1800s-children-learned-over-breakfast

Sarah Hayes

Absinthe Bottles and Prostitution in Early Colonial Melbourne

This absinthe bottle is one of 10 recovered from a rubbish pit associated with Mrs Bond’s grocer in Melbourne’s notorious Little Lon district. Absinthe, or the green fairy, was a hallucinogenic alcoholic drink available from the 18th century but reaching new heights of popularity in bohemian Paris in the late-19th century; coinciding nicely with the timing of Mrs Bond’s grocery. But was it a grocery? The absinthe bottles, along with French champagne bottles and 300 oyster shells, have led us to reinterpret the use of this site. Mrs Bond had been operating brothels in Little Lon for years and the historical documents gave the impression she had given it all up to run a respectable grocery business. The artefacts tell a different story. It seems her grocery was actually a cover for a high class brothel.

Sarah's professional facebook page, where this information was originally posted, can be found at:
https://www.facebook.com/SarahHResearch/?fref=ts

(Photos by Bronwyn Woff)

Originally posted by Elizabeth Foley

Registration is still open for the Victorian Archaeology Colloquium, to be held at La Trobe University on Friday 3 February 2017. Registration is inclusive of morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea. Please register via https://latrobe.onestopsecure.com/onestopweb/LTUEv/createbooking?e=ASSC_EV49

Program
8:30 Registration
9:00-9:30 Welcome to Country
9:30-10:00 Introduction
10:00-11:00 Session 1: Approaches: Methods and objectives
11:00-11:30 Morning tea
11:30-12:30 Session 2: Site-specific investigations
12:30-1:30 Lunch
1:30-2:30 Session 3: Regional Victoria
2:30-3:00 Afternoon tea
3:00-4:00 Session 4: Living on the edge: detection, recording and meaning of Aboriginal archaeological sites in Victoria
4:00-4:30 Conclusion