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ASHA NEWS

Compiled by Blog Editor

A reminder to members that submissions for the ASHA journal Australasian Historical Archaeology are due on 31 March. For more information see: http://www.asha.org.au/submission-information.html

The Sydney Historical Archaeology Practitioners (SHAP) Workshop has also put out a call for sessions/papers for the event on 18th May 2018. For more information see: www.archaeologyweek.com/

Written by The Dry Stone Wall Association of Australia

The Dry Stone Walls Association of Australia (DSWAA) are holding a weekend away at Bathurst, NSW that  ASHA members may be interested in:

Weekend away at Bathurst, NSW, May 11-13 2018
Planning is well underway for a fabulous weekend of heritage and discovery in and around Bathurst. We start with drinks at the magnificent Abercrombie House; built in the 1870s by the Stewarts - pioneers of Bathurst. On the Bridle Track you can imagine yourself as a drover on horseback heading up the narrow track to the village at Hill End, the beautiful Turon River below.

It's also a rare trades weekend at Bathurst where we could see violin making, photo restoration, shingle splitting, lace and whip making, and much more - and of course our own dry stone wallers; Wayne Fox and Emma Knowles will be in action.

If you stay for Monday you will see Cox's Road - the original track across the Blue Mountains - and the historic Mayfield Gardens - a lovely property and garden rich in dsw.

For more information, please see: http://dswaa.org.au/bathurst-heritage-weekend-11-13-may/

Written by NZ Archaeology Week Committee

Kia ora. A reminder that New Zealand Archaeology Week 2018 will run from April 28-May 6.

New Zealand Archaeology Week is a week-long nationwide celebration of archaeological heritage co-ordinated by the New Zealand Archaeological Association (NZAA). The aim is to increase public awareness of archaeology and highlight the importance of protecting our archaeological heritage.

Our inaugural event in April 2017 was very successful, with over 40 events being run across the country, made possible by contributions from a number of museums and heritage organisations, councils, tangata whenua, universities and consultant archaeologists. For an up-to-date listing of events being run in 2018, keep an eye on our website:  https://nzarchaeology.org/news-events/national-archaeology-week

It's not too late to get involved either! If you have an idea for an event you would be willing and able to help run, we encourage you to get in touch with our hardworking national co-ordinator Kathryn via archaeologyweek@nzarchaeology.org


Written by Caiti D'Gluyas

The next ASHA reading group is being hosted by Casey and Lowe and will be held on 22nd March. This is a semi-regular (quarterly) opportunity to catch-up with other historical archaeologists and discuss themes of interest.

Topic: Historical Artefacts
Facilitator: Robyn Stocks, Senior Artefact Specialist, Casey and Lowe
Location: Casey and Lowe Offices, 51 Reuss Street, LEICHHARDT NSW 2040
Time: 6pm, Thursday 22nd March 2017

Primary Readings
Davies, P. 2005 ‘Writing Slates and Schooling in Victoria’, Australasian Historical Archaeology 23:63-69.
Gojak, D. & I. Stuart 1999 ‘The Potential for the Archaeological Study of Clay, Tobacco Pipes from Australian Sites’, Australasian Historical Archaeology 17:38-49.
Klippel, W.E. & G.F. Schroedl 1999 ‘African slave craftsmen and single-hole bone discs from Brimstone Hill, St Kitts, West Indies’, Post-Medieval Archaeology 33:22–232.

Secondary Readings
Varman, R.V.J. 1993 Bricks and Nails: Building Materials as Criteria for Dating in Sydney and Environs from 1788, A Documentary Survey and Assessment of Dating Potential, Unpublished PhD Thesis, University of Sydney. Available online at https://ses.library.usyd.edu.au/handle/2123/1205

Contact secretary@asha.org.au if you are finding it difficult to find the readings.

The event is free and open to anyone who is interested, however, RSVPs are essential (to secretary@asha.org.au), so please get in touch if you would like to come!


Written by National Trust QLD

The National Trust has been sentenced and The Trust Talks are going to gaol! Heritage is not only about elegant houses, sweeping vistas and iconic architecture – heritage places cover all spectrums of our society, including the not so palatable aspects. Gaols, detention centres, asylums and places of conflict all represent our culture’s Wounded Heritage. These wounded places present unique challenges to those who manage their interpretation, access and conservation. Each place manager approaches this challenge differently.

Join us for an evening of talks by renowned Australian heritage managers who delve into this topic using case studies of Ned Kelly’s Glenrowan Inn and Melbourne’s Pentridge Prison. The evening will be held at Brisbane’s own wounded place: Boggo Road Gaol, with an optional staged tour available via separate booking.

The evening will include the opportunity to network with friends and colleagues, drinks and light canapes on arrival, the talk, and National Trust gift bag. This is an event not to be missed!

Our esteemed speakers include:
Libby Blamey - Historian, Lovell Chen Architects
Dr Susan McIntyre-Tamwoy - International cultural heritage consultant, Extent Heritage
Jane Alexander - Heritage Advocacy Advisor, The National Trust of Australia (Queensland)

Boggo Road Gaol will present an optional tour of the gaol before the Trust Talk. This is a chance to hear about the history of the gaol and understand what life was like for inmates. The tour will be at 5pm and run for half an hour for a special price of $11.50 for The Trust Talks attendees. Book your place now at - https://goo.gl/JoKCo5

For more information and tickets see: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/the-trust-talks-managing-the-heritage-of-wounded-places-tickets-43297394673

Written by the SHAP 2018 committee

The Sydney Historical Archaeology Practitioners’ (SHAP) Workshop, proudly organised by Extent Heritage, will be taking place once again this year during National Archaeology Week 2018. In this one-day workshop - to be held on Friday, 18 May 2018 at the Sydney Harbor YHA Big Dig Archaeology Education Centre - historical archaeologists, students and anyone interested in the discipline will come together to share ideas, recent projects, technology and developments for historical archaeology in NSW.

The theme of this year’s Workshop is: The Role of Archaeology in Heritage Conservation

Effective heritage conservation is crucial for the preservation, understanding and interpretation of the past. A number of recent developments across Australian major urban hubs and their surrounds resulted in the discovery of important and rare archaeological sites and artefacts that are able to provide a wealth of information. However, not all sites can be retained and not all of the artefacts can be displayed. This year’s SHAP is the opportunity for the industry practitioners to present the most recent archaeological discoveries and the ways they have been conserved. This gathering can also be an initiation for greater participation and presentation of Australian historical archaeology at the next ICOMOS GA and Scientific Symposium that will be hosted by Sydney in 2020.

This is a call for papers, presentations and demonstrations: if you have an exciting or relevant idea for a 15 to 20-minute presentation, please submit a 150 to 400 word abstract to Extent Heritage, as the submission information provided below. Creative session proposals are very welcome! There will also be a “Your Plug Spot” session, where you will be able to announce upcoming events, news, notices etc.

Tickets will be available in early April, so watch this space! Presenters, please remember that you must attend the conference if your paper or session is accepted. We look forward to hearing from you!

Important information for submissions:
Due date: Midnight on Monday, 2 April 2018
Submissions to: admin@extent.com.au
Please ensure submissions are relevant to the theme – we may ask you to make edits to your abstract to make it more relevant to Archaeology in Heritage Conservation

In your submission please include:
1. A subject line in your email: SHAP 2018
2. Presentation title
3. Abstract of 150 – 400 words
4. Presenter and co-authors’ names
5. Company affiliation
6. The form of your proposed session (e.g. paper presentation, workshop, demonstration, interactive session)

All abstracts are submitted for review only – not every abstract will be successfully placed into a session
Successful presenters must attend the workshop



National Trust (Australia)

Registrations are now open for the 2018 Australian Heritage Festival !

The Australian Heritage Festival is Australia’s biggest annual community-driven heritage festival. In April and May 2017, thousands of event organisers and volunteers across Australia managed almost 1,200 events to celebrate our fantastic heritage, history and culture. In 2018 we hope the festival will be even more inclusive and community inspired. We've provided lots of useful information, tips and help to ensure your event is a success.

This year we are focusing on what makes a place special, encouraging us all to embrace the future by sharing the strengths of our cultural identities. The 2018 Australian Heritage Festival theme is My Culture, My Story celebrating the diversity of cultures that have shaped our shared heritage. The Festival is an opportunity to reflect on the places where we live, work, and travel, and why they are special, celebrating our many diverse and distinctive cultures. So we call on communities to treasure their local cultural heritage by telling their stories and celebrating their traditions, including storytelling, music, food, dance, traditional games, and crafts.

What are the cultures of your region, and how are they celebrated? What are the stories of your community? Do you know an untold story that should be shared? What is the role of new generations in celebrating and protecting our heritage?

Please join us and get involved for what will be an amazing celebration.

The Australian Heritage Festival is supported through funding from the Australian Government’s National Trusts Partnership Program.

Note: Some States may have additional event organiser information and requirements.



Alison Frappell

On Friday 1 December 2017 we were pleased to welcome Prof Daniel Schávelzon and Dr Patricia Frazzi to The Big Dig Archaeology Education Centre, following their afternoon tour of The Rocks with Dr Wayne Johnson. We were delighted that the Argentinian Consul-General in Sydney, Mr Hector Raul Pelaez, was also able to join us.


Prof Daniel Schávelzon, Dr Patricia Frazzi and Dr Wayne Johnson

Prof Schávelzon and Dr Frazzi gave our members a fascinating talk about their work on the excavations of a Nazi hideout or refuge complex (image below), deep in the jungle of what is now Teyú Cuaré Park, Misiones, in Argentina. Prof Schávelzon explored the complex of three main buildings and several ancillary buildings, noting how the buildings were constructed by local labour interpreting Germanic designs and construction methods.

Four garbage pits were excavated with thousands of artefacts found, dating the site to the 1940s - 1950s, as well as a collection of coins (image below) from various German-occupied European nations.

An intriguing pit, which initially the team thought may be a grave, showed evidence of burial of an object, a cubic metre in size, which at some later point was retrieved. A belt with a Spanish military buckle (image below) belonging to General Franco’s army, in use till 1975, was deliberately buried when the pit was refilled.

Prof Schávelzon explored how the lack of historical records was ameliorated by a wealth of local stories, including building materials being reused in local housing. However, he noted that some of those local memories turned out to be recollections from newspaper and magazine articles from 1976 when the site was rediscovered, and commented on how recent international media has picked out the storyline it finds most newsworthy. The practice of historical archaeology plays a very important role in better understanding such curious sites.


Dr Frazzi recounted how her team worked in very difficult conditions to conserve significant but extremely fragile artefacts (image above), showing the remarkable transformation of matted lumps of paper into a page of newspaper and a postcard of Hitler and Mussolini. Their careful research on unusual finds, such as a fragment of expensive lamp glass from Germany, was most impressive.

For those who weren’t able to make the talk a copy of the IJHA paper about the excavations is available here: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10761-017-0442-1


Compiled by Richard Morrison

The 3rd field work season is to be undertaken by Dr Ash Lenton, ANU, for undergraduates from there but also from other Australian universities, 5-28 January 2018. It is to focus, as in previous seasons, on the investigation of a military barracks which serviced the adjacent Maria Island convict settlement in the 1840’s. Run by: School of Archaeology and Anthropology, Research School of Humanities & the Arts, ANU College of Arts and the Social Sciences, ANU.

For more information please see:
https://facebook.com/TriabunnaBarracks.Dig/     
http://archanth.cass.anu.edu.au/triabunna-barracks

Twitter #TriabunnaBarracks




Stephanie Moore

I was lucky enough last month to attend the joint ASHA/Interpretation Australia conference in Tasmania. Being new to both the ASHA conference world, and Tassie itself, Iain kindly suggested I might be the best person to provide a ‘review’ of this conference at our next Archaeology at the Pub gathering.


I kindly obliged and prepared myself with a small presentation of images from the trip and some thoughts on the how the conference ran, what I enjoyed, and what I would do differently next time. I presented this to a small, but enthusiastic crowd at The Shakespeare Hotel; many of whom had been at the conference and were happy to share their thoughts with me. We all settled in with a schooner and the increasingly popular complementary wedges to relive the scenery and the event.


We all generally agreed that the conference was thoroughly enjoyable, and that the travelling element provided a unique and interesting approach. We felt that there could have been a few less papers on the bill, as the long days made for an exhausting week – and we felt terrible for the poor presenters who drew the short straw of last session for the day! The presentations were varied in subject matter and style, and provided a good balance between the two disciplines. The opportunity to discuss with, and learn from, colleagues in the Interpretation field was also valuable, allowing many of us to walk away with renewed enthusiasm. There was unanimous agreement that the Shene Estate Gin Distillery was a winner as far as destinations went (both for the heritage value and the sneaky gin tasting). Overall, when considering the phenomenal 11 destinations and countless papers that were packed into this year’s conference, I would say it was a roaring success.

We hope to see you next time for Happy Hour beers and a plate of wedges!