asha

ASHA NEWS

Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

Historical and Contact Archaeology in North Parramatta

A site currently being excavated in North Parramatta, New South Wales has found evidence of contact between European and local Indigenous peoples in fragments of glass. The excavators have also discovered evidence of leisure and ornamentation of the residents of the previous institutions located on the site.

For more information, please see the following link:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-02-21/artefacts-show-coexistence-between-aboriginals-and-europeans/8287950



Information compiled by Bronwyn Woff

Test excavations have begun at the site of the new Queens Wharf casino, hotel and entertainment complex in Brisbane. The test excavations are being carried out in order to investigate the foundations of heritage buildings in the area. These investigations will inform proceedings for protecting the heritage buildings while works are carried out.

 

For more information, please see:

http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/heritage-work-begins-at-queens-wharf-ahead-of-construction-20170116-gtse8j.html

 

Sarah Hayes

Absinthe Bottles and Prostitution in Early Colonial Melbourne

This absinthe bottle is one of 10 recovered from a rubbish pit associated with Mrs Bond’s grocer in Melbourne’s notorious Little Lon district. Absinthe, or the green fairy, was a hallucinogenic alcoholic drink available from the 18th century but reaching new heights of popularity in bohemian Paris in the late-19th century; coinciding nicely with the timing of Mrs Bond’s grocery. But was it a grocery? The absinthe bottles, along with French champagne bottles and 300 oyster shells, have led us to reinterpret the use of this site. Mrs Bond had been operating brothels in Little Lon for years and the historical documents gave the impression she had given it all up to run a respectable grocery business. The artefacts tell a different story. It seems her grocery was actually a cover for a high class brothel.

Sarah's professional facebook page, where this information was originally posted, can be found at:
https://www.facebook.com/SarahHResearch/?fref=ts

(Photos by Bronwyn Woff)

Originally posted by Elizabeth Foley

Registration is still open for the Victorian Archaeology Colloquium, to be held at La Trobe University on Friday 3 February 2017. Registration is inclusive of morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea. Please register via https://latrobe.onestopsecure.com/onestopweb/LTUEv/createbooking?e=ASSC_EV49

Program
8:30 Registration
9:00-9:30 Welcome to Country
9:30-10:00 Introduction
10:00-11:00 Session 1: Approaches: Methods and objectives
11:00-11:30 Morning tea
11:30-12:30 Session 2: Site-specific investigations
12:30-1:30 Lunch
1:30-2:30 Session 3: Regional Victoria
2:30-3:00 Afternoon tea
3:00-4:00 Session 4: Living on the edge: detection, recording and meaning of Aboriginal archaeological sites in Victoria
4:00-4:30 Conclusion

Original post by CHNT Conference Organisers

The 22nd International Conference on Cultural Heritage and New Technologies (CHNT 2017) will take place at the City Hall of Vienna, Austria from 8-10 November 2017.

The main topic of this year:Urban Archaeology and Integration – Combining archaeology, history, and new technologies.

The aim of this conference is to enhance the collaboration between historians and archaeologists and related disciplines using new technologies and to showcase best practice applications in multidisciplinary research. The conference organizers invite sessions dealing with one of the following topics or a combination thereof:

Application of effective 3D-methods for the reconstruction of buildings, integrating archaeological excavation data with historical sources including images, thus increasing our understanding of the past

Additional digital methods for the combined visualisation of archaeological and historical data (e.g. monitoring changes and preservation of archaeological monuments based on historical images)

Application of new technologies to assess the archaeological record based on historical data (maps, tax returns, inventories, ship wreck lists, etc.) and/or combining historical sources and archaeological data in a geographical information system for recording the history of urban or rural landscapes

Games, apps, and teaching software integrating archaeological and historical knowledge

Historical data as a basis for checking or validating digital tools applied in archaeology and vice versa

Dealing with inscriptions (including cuneiform, hieroglyphs and symbols): digital methods for enhancing readability (e.g. Reflectance Transformation Imaging), pattern recognition of letters or pictograms, comparison of hand writing (same author?)

Statistical analysis investigating the correlation between historical place names and archaeological evidence


Submissions of Proposals for Sessions, Round Tables and Advanced Archaeological Trainings are due by 30 January 2017. For information on how to submit a proposal, visit the call for sessionswebpage.