asha

ASHA NEWS



Bronwyn Woff

Developers are planning to build a multi-story office block on the heritage-listed former Dennys Lascelles Wool Store in Geelong, Victoria. The Wool Store was built in 1872, for a company that became one of the most significant wool-broking businesses in Australia, and is listed for its state significance. For more information, see:

https://architectureau.com/articles/heritage-listed-geelong-wool-store-to-become-high-rise-office-block/
http://www.smh.com.au/business/property/techne-pitches-tower-for-geelong-wool-stores-20170905-gyb6ds.html



Prof Richard Mackay

The Heritage Council of Victoria is considering the feasibility of preparing a new ‘Victorian Heritage Strategy’. The previous strategy – Victoria’s Heritage: Strengthening Our Communities – operated between 2006 and 2010, but in the period since there have been significant changes, which provide the context for considering a new Heritage Strategy.

Mackay Strategic (Richard Mackay) has been commissioned to prepare a ‘feasibility study’ which looks at the opportunities, scope and implications for a new Victorian Heritage Strategy. As part of this process, stakeholders in Victoria’s Heritage are being invited to use this short survey to express opinions about a new heritage strategy – the merits, issues, opportunities and priorities at the outset of the feasibility assessment.

The survey can be accessed here and will take approximately 15 minutes to complete. (Please note that it is best to avoid Internet Explorer or to ensure that internet settings are Google compatible). Your contribution by 30 September would be greatly appreciated.



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

The following research article highlights the parallels between the throw-away society of Gold Rush Victoria and of people today, showing our wasteful culture is firmly entrenched in our collective past.

Check it out here: https://theconversation.com/gold-rush-victoria-was-as-wasteful-as-we-are-today-78473



Felicity Buckingham

These thin, plastic discs were recovered from a yard context in Lot 61 during the 2016 excavation of the old CUB complex, near the corner of Swanston and Queensberry streets, Melbourne. The above image shows record CUB2 11317 (scale in cm).

Tentatively interpreted as being promotional material (possibly badge blanks, based on size and shape), they read “MISS AUSTRALIAN AIR LEAGUE 1950” and include the Air League emblem of a winged shield. Small oxidized holes are present on all examples and may indicate they were held together by a pin or similar.


Multiple ‘blanks’, including CUB2 11317 (bottom, centre)

Originally named the ‘Air Mindedness Development League’, the Australian Air League (hereafter the ‘League’) was established in 1934 to promote “an interest in aviation both as a career or as a hobby in the youth of Australia”, and “to provide opportunities to develop good citizenship, teamwork and to develop ingenuity and resourcefulness of members” (https://www.airleague.com.au/about/history).

In September 1950, the League sponsored Miss Patricia Sheales, a 20 year old hair salon receptionist (Age, 12 Sep 1950, p. 1), as a contestant in the Miss Victoria quest (Age, 11 Sep 1950, p. 5). These blanks embody the hope that Patricia would go through to the national competition. Patricia then made a number of public appearances, including the League’s annual parade (Age, 2 Oct 1950, p. 4), the Caulfield races (Age, 23 Oct 1950, p. 8), and a ball (Argus, 2 Dec 1950, p. 8), as well as appearing in several promotional pieces of editorial, such as the image below of several Miss Victoria entrants (Advocate, 16 Dec 1950, p. 3).


Pat Sheales (back row, centre) and other Miss Victoria contestants (Advocate, 16 Dec 1950, p. 3)

Unfortunately, Patricia didn’t win the Victorian competition. However, no Miss Australia was crowned at all in 1950 (Age, 24 Feb 1951, p. 3), due to a dispute regarding the chaperone assigned to the previous year’s winner for her international tour (West Australian, 15 Apr 1950, p. 10). Formerly Miss NSW, the NSW branch of the competition backed the decision, and withheld finances unless another chaperone was appointed - the result being the cancellation of said tour outright, and the discontinuation of the competition until 1953.

These blanks were chosen for the light they shed on the youth organisations and popular culture of mid twentieth-century Australia, as well as for the questions they ask about the site. How was the League, the Miss Australia competition, or Patricia Sheales related to Lot 61? If these blanks were promotional items, they were not needed after the Miss Victoria competition in December 1950, and their yard location could suggest they were simply thrown away, and may not have any further relation to the site. Analysis is ongoing, and will hopefully help to answer some of these questions.

Felicity Buckingham, along with Zvonka Stanin, is currently analysing artefacts from the latest CUB dig for Alpha Archaeology, and can be contacted at felicitybuckingham@yahoo.com



AACAI Committee

AACAI is hosting a Photogrammetry for Archaeological Consulting Workshop on September 22, which will be presented by Andrew Wilkinson. The workshop will be held at Biosis Pty Ltd, 38 Bertie Street, Port Melbourne.

The one day workshop is designed as an intensive course to introduce the basics of photogrammetry and how this technique can be applied in archaeological consulting. The workshop will cover the application of photogrammetry in archaeology, how to capture the subject, how to process the images, and applications for presenting the final product.

At the completion of this workshop, participants will have an understanding of photogrammetry and be able to record a subject and produce their own photogrammetric models.

Due to the practical nature of this workshop participation will be limited to 20 people. Morning and afternoon tea will be provided. Numerous lunch venues exist within close proximity to the venue.

The workshop will be demonstrated with Photoscan Standard edition. Participants should bring a laptop with Agisoft Photoscan software installed, a digital camera (DSLR preferred) and notebook. Participants will be working in groups, so those who do not have access to a laptop, the Photoscan software or a camera, should be able to work alongside someone who does.

Agisoft Photoscan software download and computer requirements are available from their website: http://www.agisoft.com/ 30 day trial and education licenses are available. Notes will be made available to participants prior to the workshop. Participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

Cost: AACAI members $150, Non-AACAI members $200

Payment details: www.trybooking.com/276278

For more information, contact: Adrienne Ellis adrienne@matrixarchaeology.com.au



Paul Macgregor, The Uncovered Past Institute

The Uncovered Past Institute will be undertaking the first archaeological excavation in Victoria of a Chinese mining settlement between 9th - 28th October 2017. For around thirty years from the late 1850s Harrietville was home to hundreds of Victoria’s Chinese gold miners. The largely undisturbed site includes mine workings, water races, building foundations, and gardens: a rare survivor of the heyday of Chinese gold mining in Victoria.

The project, happening over three weeks in October 2017, will be led by archaeologist Gordon Grimwade and run as a field school, and funded by public participation, along the lines of public field schools held overseas. It is an initiative of The Uncovered Past Institute, a not-for-profit organisation established in 2016 to run archaeology projects based on public participation. Students and members of the public are encouraged to participate in this excavation.

The project team includes archaeologists Gordon Grimwade, Melissa Dunk, Jennifer Chandler, Allison Carrol and Asa Ferrier; and historians Paul Macgregor, Diann Talbot and Andrew Swift.

Highlights of project participation include:
Intensive training, and participation in, fieldwork (site excavation, site surveying), and artefact processing (cleaning, recording, identifying and cataloguing).
A maximum of 4 participants for every supervising archaeologist in our team.
Guided history and heritage tours of the Upper Ovens Valley, focusing on mining history and the Chinese pioneers of the Valley.
Daily and evening workshops and lectures.
Working alongside some of the most experienced archaeologists and historians of Chinese heritage, and mining heritage, in Australia.
Learning how to identify Chinese artefacts such as ceramics, coins, bottles, foodstuffs and beverages, medicines and opium-smoking paraphernalia.
Being a part of archaeological discovery in one of the key areas of 19th century Chinese mining history in Australia.

For more information, please visit the project website:www.uncoveredpast.org.au/harrietville-chinese-mining-village/



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

A swathe of excavations will soon begin in Melbourne, ahead of multiple new train stations being built in the CBD. The stations will service a new tunnel which is being built below the city to ease congestion in the current city loop tunnel. Excavations are expected to uncover hundreds of thousands of artefacts, as well as evidence from the early stages of Melbourne's urban city.

For more information, please see the following news article:
www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/national/melbourne-metro-rail-project-archaeological-digs-expected-to-find-up-to-one-million-artefacts/



Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

Excavations have now concluded at the site of the Carlton Hotel, Geelong. The excavations were carried out ahead of the construction of a new building for the National Disability Insurance Agency in Geelong’s CBD. Early domestic building footings were discovered at the back of the hotel, as well as a barrel cesspit. Artefacts of note included crockery related to the previous Union Inn Hotel, various pipes and a complete bone domino.

For more information, please see the following link:

www.geelongadvertiser.com.au/news/geelong/from-beneath-old-carlton-hotel-site-hints-of-gold-rush-era-lifestyle/





Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

The Heritage Act 2017 which becomes operative on 1 November 2017 is proposed to be supported by new Victorian Heritage Regulations 2017 and Heritage (Underwater Cultural Heritage) Regulations 2017 announced by the Minister for Planning. The Regulations will “set fees for certain activities, set penalties and infringement offences, require details and results of historical archaeological surveys to be provided to the Executive Director, prescribe documents and forms for activities established by the Heritage Act 2017”. A Regulations Impact Statement (RIS) has been prepared, and comments are invited on this and the two sets of Regulations themselves. The closing date for submission of comments is Friday 28th July.

For more information, please see the following link:

https://www.heritage.vic.gov.au/legislation/heritage-regulations


 




Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

Excavation of the historic Bridge Inn Hotel is taking place at Mernda, north-east of Melbourne. Archaeologists have uncovered footings of the early hotel just under the top soil. Various artefacts have been found, as well as aboriginal artefacts. An open day is being held on Saturday, 8th of July between 10am-2pm.

For more information, please see the following links:

http://levelcrossings.vic.gov.au/media-library/news/archaeological-dig-underway-in-mernda
        

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/north/bridge-inn-south-morang-archaeological-dig-makes-key-discoveries/news-story/48359c71371a03f5e024dab1cdf93f04


http://www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/north/archeologists-dig-deep-to-uncover-mysterious-history-of-bridge-inn-hotel-in-mernda/news-story/74b66d48466c478b4d196e40d3d622cd