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ASHA NEWS



Felicity Buckingham and Zvonka Stanin

The bricks in the images above and below were recovered from the southern end of Lot 67 in the 2016 excavation of the old CUB complex, near the corner of Swanston and Queensberry streets, Melbourne. This excavation was undertaken by Alpha Archaeology for Scape. Chosen for their rarity (an unusual find in Australia, and perhaps outside of France), these bricks were part of feature 066, a chalky white hand-made brick construction that was initially interpreted as a fireplace within a cellar.


At least three of the feature’s surfaces were comprised of bricks made in Langeais, a town in central France - bearing the makers marks of “Desouches Hubert a Langeais” and “Alexis Lemesle a Langeais”. Initial online research suggests Hubert Desouches ran his business in the 1850s and was declared bankrupt in 1859 (http://en.patrimoine-de-france.com/indre-et-loire/langeais/briqueterie-9.php, accessed 1/08/2016). Alexis Lemesle also appeared to have brick works around the same time - 1853 to perhaps 1875 (http://www.actuacity.com/four-a-carreaux_m81946/, accessed 1/08/2015).


Excavation showed that the fireplace/feature 066 was most likely added after the construction of the original cellar - an awkward, retrofitted addition to the cellar flume, sitting on top of original foundations and built into the cellar wall. Unless reused/curated (e.g. as ballast), these dates suggest a possible 1850s construction date for the cellar (see below).


This area of Melbourne was first settled in the 1850s, with these earlier buildings demolished and replaced with brick terraces sometime before the mid 1880s. Although artifact analysis is ongoing, it is possible that feature 066, and the French bricks added to it after its initial construction, may represent the earliest, c. 1850s to c. 1870s of occupation of Lot 67.

Images provided by Alpha Archaeology, showing artefacts CUB2 04537, CUB2 04538, CUB2 04539 and CUB2 04632. CUB2 04537 and CUB2 04538 with multiple finger print marks. Site image: CUB Scape, Lot 67, view south east facing Swanston Street, showing showing feature 066 at far wall of cellar. Photo credit Zvonka Stanin

Felicity and Zvonka are currently analysing the artefacts from the latest CUB dig for Alpha Archaeology, and can be contacted at either felicitybuckingham@yahoo.com or zstanin50@gmail.com



Compiled by Richard Morrison

A call for comment by COB 14 July 2017 on the proposed National Heritage listing of the Queen Victoria Markets in Melbourne has been made by the Australian Heritage Council. The Council’s initial assessment is that the Markets might have National Heritage values. A draft map and description of potential National Heritage values are available at:

http://www.environment.gov.au/heritage/organisations/australian-heritage-council/national-heritage-assessments/queen-victoria-market-proposed-national-heritage-listing

Caroline Spry

As part of La Trobe University's 50th Anniversary celebrations, you are warmly invited to ‘Looking back, looking forward for La Trobe Archaeology.' This day-long event will bring together students, staff, alumni and others over four sessions to connect past and present members, showcase La Trobe Archaeology’s research and capabilities, and build pathways for future work opportunities and research-industry collaborations.

The first session will be a panel discussion on career pathways by alumni. The second will include discussion and demonstration of La Trobe Archaeology’s research capabilities and cutting-edge technologies, and how they can facilitate research-industry collaborations. The third session will comprise a conversation with Emeritus Professor David Frankel, Emeritus Professor Jim Allen and Professor Susan Lawrence. In the final session, past and present members and others will have the opportunity to meet and reconnect over light refreshments.

At the conclusion of the day, an informal dinner will be held at The Eagle bar, La Trobe University.

Date: Friday 19th May 2017 (National Archaeology Week 2017)
Time: 9am-5pm
Venue: West Lecture Theatre 2, La Trobe University (Bundoora campus)

Please note that the day event is free, but registration is essential viahttps://latrobe.onestopsecure.com/onestopweb/LTUEv/tran?tran-type=7145

Session 1: Alumni reflections on working in archaeology and cultural heritage management
This session will comprise a panel of alumni from La Trobe Archaeology who will offer their experiences and insights on building a career and working in different spheres of archaeology and cultural heritage, from undergraduate studies to government agencies, archaeological consulting companies, museums, universities, heritage councils, international scientific advisory bodies and beyond.

Session 2: La Trobe Archaeology now – building research-industry collaborations
This session will showcase La Trobe Archaeology’s research capabilities, and discuss how cutting-edge technologies at La Trobe Archaeology can encourage detailed, multifaceted and collaborative approaches to investigating, visualising and preserving our past.

Session 3: A conversation with Emeritus Professor David Frankel, Emeritus Professor Jim Allen and Professor Susan Lawrence
This conversation with Emeritus Professor David Frankel, Emeritus Professor Jim Allen and Professor Susan Lawrence will focus on past, present and future directions of La Trobe Archaeology, and the challenges and opportunities that face students, researchers and professionals in archaeology and cultural heritage management.

Session 4: Looking forward – developing work opportunities and collaborations
The final session provides the opportunity for students, staff, alumni and others to meet, reconnect and create work opportunities and collaborations over light refreshments. Professionals and researchers working in different areas of archaeology and cultural heritage management will also be available for one-on-one discussions about graduate opportunities and research projects.

We would also like to ask if you would like to share any photographs for use in a slideshow at the event, which will be reflecting on students and their experiences at La Trobe, both past and present.



Catherine Tucker

This cutlery fork that was recovered from excavations of a large rubbish pit at Pentridge Prison, located to the north of Melbourne. The assemblage is thought to date to the mid-nineteenth century and this particular artefact was chosen as a representative example of the many cutlery items recovered during the excavations. It is a utilitarian object that has been modified for use specifically at the prison and was probably used by the inmates.

The metal is now heavily corroded but it has a shaft that extends all the way to the end of the handle. Over the metal handle there are two identically shaped bone lengths that are attached to each side of the fork shaft by three small evenly spaced nails. The bone handle is 14mm wide at the fork end and 20mm at the handle end and is 84mm in length. These dimensions are the same for all of the forks in the assemblage indicating that the cutlery was most likely mass produced in specialist factories rather than made in one of the prison workshops.

On one side of the fork there are roughly carved roman numerals – XXV (25) and numbers such as these were found on all bone handled cutlery in the assemblage. The highest number recovered was LVIII (58), meaning that there were at least 58 objects in the original set. The numerals are deeply incised on the handles and the roughness and variability in style indicate that these marks were probably made at the prison.

These numbered utensils are particularly identifiable as prison or institutional artefacts, places where it was important to keep track of sharp objects, and they reflect the processes involved in managing inmates in nineteenth century prisons.

Catherine Tucker is a part-time PHD student at LaTrobe University who also works as a consultant archaeologist, mostly in Victoria.

 





The Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria

The Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria is a group that promotes the study of archaeology, anthropology, ethno-archaeology and ethno-history in both Australia and further abroad. Lectures, from a range of talented presenters, are held every third Thursday of the month at 6:30pm at the The Kathleen Syme Library and Community Centre at 251 Faraday St, Carlton.

Sign up with Eventbrite and we’ll know you’re coming.

For more information, please see: http://aasv.org.au/lectures/
The Johnston Collection

The Johnston Collection, housed in Fairhall, East Melbourne, is holding the Annual William Johnston Exhibtion-House Tour from February-May 2017. The Collection is the legacy of William Robert Johnston (1911-1986) an antique dealer and collector and the Annual Tour focuses on the original arrangement of Johnston's collection in Fairhall Exhibition House when it was first opened to the public.

For more information, please see: https://www.johnstoncollection.org/


Complied by Bronwyn Woff

The Australasian Institute for Maratime Archaeology and Heritage Victoria are running an Introduction to Maritime Archaeology course on 22-23 April 2017. More details regarding the course (Part 1) can be found at http://www.aima-underwater.org.au/parts-i-iv/  

For more information, please contact Peter Harvey: Peter.Harvey@delwp.vic.gov.au .



Caroline Spry, La Trobe University

All are invited to ‘Looking back, looking forward for La Trobe Archaeology’. This event, which ties in with La Trobe University’s 50th Anniversary, will connect students, staff, alumni and others, showcase La Trobe Archaeology’s capabilities and build pathways for future careers and research-industry collaborations. It will comprise a panel discussion on career pathways by alumni working in archaeology and cultural heritage management; discussions and demonstrations of the equipment and services offered by La Trobe Archaeology; and an opportunity for students, staff, alumni and others to meet, reconnect and create work opportunities and collaborations over light refreshments.

Please save the date, and stay tuned for more details:
Date: Friday 19th May 2017 (National Archaeology Week 2017)
Venue: La Trobe University, Melbourne (Bundoora campus)

Compiled by Bronwyn Woff

 
The Melbourne Free University is running a series of lectures entitled "History Matters". The lectures run from 6.30 - 8.00pm at The Alderman in Brunswick East.

Upcoming lectures include:
16 March - Susan Lawrence - Liquid gold: How controlling water made Victoria's miners rich
23 March - Nadia Rhook - Speaking in grids: the order of language from slums to Marvellous Melbourne
30 March - Katie Holmes - History of ANZAC
6 April - Liz Conor - Graphic distortions: The comic misadventures of cartoonist Eric Jolliffe's Whitchetty's Tribe (as read against 18C and other Whiteman Hissyfits)

 

For more information, please see the following link: http://www.melbournefreeuniversity.org/courses/history-matters/

Bronwyn Woff and Cathy Tucker

Please join us for a tour of Museum Victoria's dedicated storage facility on Friday 17th March 2017 followed by lunch at the Post Office Hotel in Coburg.



Attendees of the last tour enjoyed exploring the various objects of State significance at the storage facility late in 2016. Spots are limited so make sure you sign up soon!

See the following blog post for more on what the attendees of the last tour experienced:

http://www.asha.org.au/news/museum_store_tour